Our Firemen, The History of the NY Fire Departments

Chapter 23, Part VII

By Holice and Debbie

SHELTON'S FIRST BAND

Engine Company No. 42

Hook and Ladder Company No. 12

Engine Company No. 43

Hose Company No. 43

WANNAMACKER'S BAND

Engine Company No. 44

Hose Company No. 44

Hose Company No. 45

Engine Company No. 48

YORKVILLE BAND

Engine Company No. 45

Hose Company No. 46

Hook and Ladder Company No. 13

Hose Company No. 48

Engine Company No. 49

TENTH DIVISION

Assistant Engineer John Brice, Marshal.

WHITWORTH'S BAND

Hose Company No. 49

Engine Company No. 50

Hose Company No. 50

Engine Company No. 51

SHELTON'S SECOND BAND

Hose Company No. 50

Hook and Ladder Company No. 14

Hose Company No. 52

Hose Company No. 54

DODWORTH'S SECOND BAND

Hook and Ladder Company No. 15

Hose Company No. 57

Hose Company No. 58

JEFFERSON BRASS BAND

Hose Company No. 60

Hose Company No. 61

The several divisions met as follows, at 10 A.M.:

First Division in Monroe Street, right on Market Street.

Second Division in Monroe Street, right on Jefferson Street.

Third Division in Madison Street, right on Gouverneur Street.

Fourth Division in Madison, right on Clinton Street.

Fifth Division in Madison, right on Rutgers Street.

Sixth Division in Henry Street, right on Market Street.

Seventh Division in Henry Street, right on Rutgers Street.

Eighth Division in Henry Street, right on Clinton Street.

Ninth division in East Broadway, right on Gouverneur Street.

Tenth Division in East Broadway, right on Jefferson Street.

The line, four abreast, countermarched up Monroe Street, through Gouverneur, down Madison, through Market, up Henry, through Gouverneur to East Broadway, thence to Grand Street, down Grand Street to the Bowery, up the Bowery and Third Avenue to Twenty-third Street, through Twenty-third Street to the Eighth Avenue, down Eighth Avenue and through Bleecker Street to Broadway, down Broadway through the Park, and through Bleecker Street to Broadway, down Broadway through the Park where the procession was reviewed by the Mayor, Common Council, heads of Departments of the City government, Board of Fire Commissioners, ex-Chief Engineers, and ex-Assistant Engineers. The line then passed out the easy gate and was dismissed.

An exceedingly fine sight was the firemen's torchlight procession on September 1, 1856, on the occasion of the completion of the first Atlantic Cable and the reception tendered Mr. Cyrus W. Field and the officers of the steamships Niagara, Gorgon, and Indus. Seven o'clock was the hour set for the assembling of the Department. The whole city was brilliantly illuminated. The firemen appeared in their characteristic uniform--fire caps, red shirts and black trousers. They met in the neighborhood of Fifth Avenue and Fortieth Street. Marching four abreast, bearing Drummond lights, camphene lamps, Roman candles, Bengal lights and quite a forest of torches, the procession moved down to Union Square and around the statute of Washington. Thousands of people lined the sidewalks and filled the windows of the route, and the firemen, as they passed, were lustily cheered.

The line did not light up until it reached the statute of Washington, and then the effect was magical. No boys were allowed to carry torches or take any part whatever in the parade. Chief Harry Howard ordered the companies to take their spare hose from their hose racks, reel them on tenders and keep them in the house on the night of the procession, and those who had no tenders to coil the hose and place it near the front doors in order that police and citizens might have free access to the houses in case of fire. The following is the detail of the procession:

Transcribed by Holice B. Young

HTML by Debbie

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