Our Firemen, The History of the NY Fire Departments

Chapter 48, Part XII

By Holice and Debbie

FIRE INSURANCE SURVEYORS

Merchants'

Michael Hynard

Brooklyn

T. C. Bergen

Lafayette

W. Blain

Resolute

Hiram Funk

FIRE INSURANCE PATROL, Alfred Carson, Superintendent.

PATROL NO. 1.--
Captain-- John Cornwell
First assistant-- Thomas E. Howe
Second Assistant--Andrew A. Burrows

Patrolmen--Edmund Lister, James Franklin, Charles Doxey, George Bostman, John Haight, Samuel White, Stephen Hallich, Sidney Spellman, Charles Atkinson, Joseph Walsh, Henry Jones, John Cairns, Jeremiah Twomey, Benjamin Smith, John Hartman, John Kimmons, William Bassett, Edward Butler, James McCann, Edward Adams, Francis Raymond, Jacob Van Winkle, John S. Craft, Henry Hempstead, John Slowey, James Guest, Samuel Barnes, Joseph Bellows, John Lake, John Farnwell, Lewis Sinn.

Captain--John Mackey
First Assistant--John Keegan
Second Assistant--John H. Warren

Patrolmen--Stephen Hallich, Thomas Foley, James Craft, Thomas Kipp, Michael Noll, John Plunkett, John Walsh, George Stuyvesant, Philip Butler, William Mawley, Henry Wetzel, Theodore Arnold, David Clute, David Adams, John Reed, Andrew Glore, Joseph Contie, Geo. Daniels, George Reed, peter Schields, Joseph Ruchman, Charles Holder, Thomas Boerum, Thomas Gray, Peter Rose, William Minard, Henry Schoble, William H. Pook, William Reamon, Anderson Woods, George Heckadorn, Joseph Hunter.

PATROL NO. 2--
Captain--John P. Lacour
Assistant--George Shannon

Patrolmen--Henry Allaman, George Van Benschoten, Dennis McCarthy, George Wright, Aaron Watson, Joseph W. Sandford, William Symes, James E. Colgrove, John Hannon, James McKenzie, Gardiner Van Brunt, George Frazier, John Lee, W. H. Johne, Edgar Smith, Edgar E. Laing.

Captain--John Crossin
Assistant--Joseph Gerrodett

Patrolmen--John Rafferty, Bernard Clements, Charles Chamberlain, Francis Jackson, Elias Van Benschoten, John Neigengost, William Hubert, Martin Kraus, T. B. Book, M. Robertson, John Brower, Thomas Mitchell, Thomas Rettenfield, William Henderson, F. Brimmer.

Although the commissioners showed no favors to, and disciplined all, rebellious companies and members, both of the Volunteer and Paid Departments, whenever an opportunity occurred to oblige or advantage the retiring force, it was done. In this way the furniture and necessary outfits of many Volunteer Companies were purchased for the Paid force, which took possession of their quarters, and Volunteer companies were allowed to take away as relics portions of the apparatus. A pleasant feature of the period between the decision of the Court of Appeals on the constitutionality of the Metropolitan Act and the putting of the Paid force into active service, was the readiness which men like John J. Gorman, James Hayes, and many others, who fought the Paid system to the end, gave the benefit of their experience, aid and advice, to the New regime. As an illustration of this, take the meeting of engineers and foremen at Firemen's Hall on the first of July, 1865, when Martin J. Keese said in substance that he was going to do his duty as long as the new commissioners desired. He did not care if it was Thomas C. Acton's house that was on fire; he would be one of the first to go and put it out, and when certain organs shortly after announced a terrible riot in the Fifth District between certain companies, Hugh Bonner, W. F. Squires and W. H. Pierpoint lost no time in denouncing the statement as a falsehood gotten up to injure the Volunteers. The last meeting of the representatives was held in Firemen's Hall July 24, 1865, and they were addressed by Treasurer John S. Giles.

The appointment of employees on the clerical staff and in the fire telegraph bureau proceeded shortly. Charles L. Chapin was appointed superintendent of telegraph August 4, 1865, vice Charles Robinson, contractor; and John W. Smith, lineman, and S. S. Parker, battery boy, were appointed a few days later. Patrick Dailey, Isaac G. Seixas and Abraham D. Carlock were the first operators. The paid force was then below Eighty-seventh Street, and at first there was only sixty-three signal stations established, and district alarms were sent out above fourteenth Street. There was no shut boxes, and their establishment was retarded by patent right claims. At one of the first meetings of the Metropolitan Fire commissioners a plan to stop the ringing of the alarm bells was discussed, but the nuisance was not abated until many years later. August 30, the board received notice from Governor Fenton of the resignation of James W. Booth, and next day Mr. Joshua G. Abbe was appointed commissioner by Messrs. Pinckney, Engs, and Brown.

The committee as then appointed were: Appointments and Discipline--Commissioner Abbe. Buildings and Supplies--Commissioner Brown. Apparatus and Hose--Commissioner Engs. Finance and Telegraph--Commissioner Pinckney. Mr. Abbe was able and conscientious, and did his duty as a commissioner as well as circumstances permitted, but the composition of the board was such that the tie votes often thwarted measures of reform, discipline, and improvements and the result was a lack of efficiency, the rank and file not being slow to take sides indicated by the votes of the commissioners. In spite of this and an increase in the number of fires and losses--which was basely charged to the Volunteers--the Paid Department conspired favorably with the Old system. The records of the mustering out of the volunteers show the number returned as active firemen by the clerk of the Common Council as three thousand eight hundred and ten, but the records of the fire commissioners indicate a less number. These records are known as being far from complete. Several companies did not send in returns, and many firemen did not claim their discharge, while the resolution that no discharge should be granted unless the firemen had done fifty per cent of duty has since been upset by a decision of the courts. About one hundred and sixty firemen appointed by the Old commissioners in April, May, and June were not recognized by the Metropolitan commissioners. Such Volunteers as did the duty prescribed were recognized on the sixth of November, 1865, in the following resolution offered by Commissioner Engs:

Transcribed by Holice B. Young

HTML by Debbie

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