Our Police Protectors
History of New York Police
Chapter 13, Part 4

By Holice and Debbie

 

Before being qualified as a Patrolman, the following form of statement must be made under oath, and subscribed to by the applicant.

POLICE DEPARTMENT OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK

300 Mulberry Street.

New York___________________ 187__.

STATEMENT of______________________ an applicant for appointment of Patrolman of the Police force of the City of New York, made for the purpose of testing his qualifications.

 

Questions

Answers

What is your name?

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In what year, day, and month were you born?

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Where were you born?

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If not born in the United States, have you been naturalized? When and Where?

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Can you read and write English?

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Have you been arrested for misdemeanor, or for any crime?

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Have you been convicted of any crime or misdemeanor?

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Have you resided in this State for one continuous year last past?

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Where do you now reside?

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What Family have you?

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What has been your occupation?

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Have you ever had rheumatism?

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Have you ever had a fit of any kind?

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Have you ever had piles, and how long since?

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If your parents, or either of them are dead, at that age of what disease did they die?

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Have you been in any military service?

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Were you honorably discharged?

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Have you ever been a Policeman?

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Have you paid, or promised to pay, or given any money or other consideration to any person, directly or indirectly, for any aid or influence towards procuring your appointment?

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NOTICE: Applicants are required to bill the banks on the other page of this paper in their own handwriting, without any aid, assistance, or suggestion from any other person. This must be done in the office of the Chief Clerk. Any false statements, evasion, or deception in answering the within questions will be good grounds for rejection of the application, and of dismissal from the Force.

All order to the Superintendent of Police emanates from and are issued to him only by the Board of Police, and all orders to the Police force are issued by the Superintendent tot he Inspectors, or Captains of Police, and by him to them communicated to the force, or any member or members thereof; he is the chief executive officer of the Police force, subject the orders, rules, and regulations of the Board of Police.

Each Inspector is held responsible for the general good conduct and order of his district, as the Captains of the Police are held responsible for the good conduct and order of his respective precinct; and while no rule is laid down by the Board of Police of his precise government, it is expected that each Inspector will visit portions of his district, and the station houses therein, at uncertain hours of the day and night. He will diligently inquire into every complaint made by citizens of laxity or misconduct in performance of duty by members of the force, and report the same to the Superintendent.

Sergeants in turn, shall patrol their precincts, and see tat the Roundsmen and Patrolmen of their platoons or sections are performing their duty properly. It is the duty of the Sergeant on patrol to go on patrol with his section or platoon; to remain out during the tour, in the vigilant performance of duty; and to return with the men to the station house, at the end of the tour. There are four Roundsmen for each precinct, two for each platoon; to be selected from the Patrolmen by the Board of Police, and to hold the position during the pleasure of the Board. The Roundsmen shall promptly obey all orders received from their superior officers; shall set an example of sobriety, discretion, skill, industry, and promptness to the Patrolmen under their command; and, at all times, appear nearly attired, and cleanly in their persons and equipments. Each Sergeant, Roundsmen, or other visiting officer, should see each Patrolman under his command while on post, at least once during each tour of duty.

The prevention of crime being the most important object in view, the Patrolmen's exertions must be constantly used to accomplish that end. He must examine and make himself perfectly acquainted with every person living on his post; vigilantly watch every description of person passing over his post; and to the utmost of his power prevent the commission of assaults, breaches of the peace, and all other crimes about to be committed.

On charges preferred by Mayor Cooper, Governor Robinson removed Commissioners Nichols and Smith. Joel B. Erhardt's term had expired. Charles F. MacLean was appointed April 18, 1879m in place of Sidney B. Nichols. Stephen B. French was appointed May 20, 1879, in place of William F. Smith. Morrison resigned November 24, 1879, and John R. Voorhis was appointed in his place.

Sidney P. Nichols and William F. Smith were reinstated February 7, 1880, by the Court, which caused the removal of MacLean and Voorhis. Joel W. Mason was appointed May 25, 1880, in place of DeWitt C. Wheeler, whose term of office had expired.

Mayor Brace appointed James Matthews Police Commissioner on March 11, 1881, in place of William F. Smith, resigned. Commissioner Matthews served the unexpired term of William F. Smith, and Mayor Grace re-appointed Mr. Matthews to succeed himself. Mayor Edson re-appointed Sidney P. Nichols January 9, 1883, to succeed himself.

Mr. Nichols died on the twenty-eighth of October, 1884, and Fitz John Porter was appointed to fill the unexpired term.

 

Next

Our Police Protectors, History of the New York Police, Published for the benefit of the Police Pension Fund, by Augustine Costello, Published by Author, 1885.

Transcribed by Holice B. Young

HTML by Debbie

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