Ontario Co. News Articles

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Canandaigua News

- 1915 - 

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Democrat  & Chronicle, Rochester, NY    Sunday,    Jan 3, 1915    by: GSubyak@aol.com

MEATH - In this city, Friday night, January 1, 1915, Bernard J. MEATH, of Canandaigua, N. Y., aged 45 years. He is survived by his wife, Julia ROACH  MEATH; his mother, Mrs. Patrick MEATH, of Canandaigua, N. Y.; three brothers,  James, of Cleveland, Ohio; Howard and William, of Canandaigua, N. Y.; three sisters, Mary, of Canandaigua, N. Y.,  Mrs. John DUGAN, of Rochester, Mrs.  John MARTIN, of Mount Morris, N. Y. -The remains were removed to Hyland Mortuary Chapel, No. 9_2 Main street 
west, and will be taken to Canandaigua, N. Y., for interment.

WHITE - Mrs. Lura M. WHITE, daughter of the late Joseph and Louise PITCHER, died yesterday at the home, No. 36 Pearl street, Canandaigua. She leaves a son, Charles E. WHITE, of this city; a brother, Eugene PITCHER, of Parma and two sisters, Mrs. Emma ALLEN, of this city, and Mrs. James CORBET, of Barnard. Mrs. WHITE had been a teacher in Canandaigua schools for thirty years. Ill health forced her to give up her position recently. She was a member of the First Congregational Church of Canandaigua for thirty-five years.

Democrat  & Chronicle, Rochester, NY    Monday,    Jan 4, 1915    by: GSubyak@aol.com

MRS. LURA M. WHITE - Canandaigua, Jan. 3 - The death of Mrs. Lura M. WHITE, for about thirty-one years a teacher in the first grade of the Canandaigua public schools, occurred  yesterday morning in the home of her sister-in-law Mrs. C. M. OSGOOD, in Pearl  street, aged 66 years. She leaves a son, Charles E. WHITE, of Rochester; a  brother Eugene PITCHER, of Parma, and two sisters, Mrs. Emma ALLEN, of Rochester, and Mrs. James CORBETT, of Barnard. The funeral will be held from the OSGOOD home here at 2:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, with Rev. Livingston I. TAYLOR, Congregationalist pastor here, officiating.

Democrat  & Chronicle, Rochester, NY    Thursday,    Jan 7, 1915    by: GSubyak@aol.com

McCARTHY - At her residence, No. 125 Park street, Canandaigua, N. Y., Tuesday noon, January 5, 1915, Nora McCARTHY. She leaves four brothers, Jeremiah and John, of Rochester, Charles and Patrick of Canandaigua; one sister, Mrs. T. P. MURRAY, of Canandaigua.  Notice of funeral later.

Democrat  & Chronicle, Rochester, NY    Friday,    Jan 8, 1915    by: GSubyak@aol.com

McCARTHY - The funeral of Miss Nora McCARTHY, who died in Canandaigua Wednesday, January 6, 1915, will take place from her residence, No.  123 Park street, Saturday morning at 9 o'clock and at 9:30 from St. Mary's  Church. Interment
will be made in Calvary cemetery. 

ONTARIO COUNTY JOURNAL     Friday      January 8, 1915     Pg 5. col  5        by: Ron Hanley
 
MEATH - Following a severe illness of 18 months, the death of Bernard J. Meath occurred at Rochester on Friday night.  Mr. Meath was one of Canandaigua's young business men, and for some time had conducted a meat market here.  He was born on February 5, 1869, and had always lived in this vicinity. On January 15, 1896, he was married to Miss Julia L. Roche, of Canandaigua, who survives him. There also survive one brother, James, of Cleveland, Ohio, three sisters, Mrs. John Dugan, of Rochester, Mrs. John Martin, of Mt. Morris, and Miss Mary Meath of Canandaigua, two half brothers, William and Howard, of Canandaigua.  The funeral services were held at St. Mary's Church on Tuesday morning, Rev. Robert J. Henry was celebrant. The Knights of Columbus and the Erina Hose Company attended in a body. Interment was made in Calvary Cemetery.

 

ONTARIO COUNTY TIMES    Wednesday    February 17, 1915     Pg 8, col  4   by: Ron Hanley    
 
MARRIED     CLAUDIUS -  MC CORMACK - At Canandaigua, February 15, 1915, Edgar J. Claudius and Miss Elizabeth McCormack, both of Canandaigua.

ONTARIO COUNTY TIMES  Wednesday January 27, 1915  Pg 8, col  4 & 5            by: Ron Hanley    
 
Mrs. Lorinus K. Fellows -  Mrs. Caroline B. Fellows, widow of Lorinus K. Fellows, died at the Memorial hospital on Sunday afternoon after a three weeks illness from pneumonia.
She was born in Holland Patent seventy five years ago, and lived there for forty five years. She then removed to Canandaigua, where she had lived ever since.
Mrs. Fellows leaves a daughter, Mrs. Robert D. Patterson, with whom she resided, a son, Folger Fellows of Walker, and a sister, Mrs. Harriet Fenn, of Chicago. 
The funeral will be held from the home of Mrs. Patterson, with the Rev. George E. Finlay of the Baptist church officiating. The burial will be in Woodlawn.

 THE  VICTOR  HERALD      Friday       March 12, 1915      col 3      by: Ron Hanley
 
 OBITUARY  Brady 
James Brady of Canandaigua, 59 years of age, was stricken with cerebral hemorrhage on the street in that city, Saturday afternoon. He was taken to Thompson Memorial Hospital, where he passed away at 7 o'clock Sunday evening.  Mr. Brady was unmarried and made his home with a niece, Mrs. H. C. Klingman, in Canandaigua.  Those who survive are three brothers and three sisters, Peter Brady of Attica, Arthur Brady of Padleford, and John Brady of Yorktown, Indiana, Mrs. E. B. Case and Mrs. John Brady, both of Victor, and Mrs. Frank Christopher of Canandaigua. The funeral was held, Tuesday morning at 9 30 o'clock, from St. Mary's church, Canandaigua.

Victor Herald, Victor, NY       Fri,           March 12, 1915                  by: Dianne Thomas

HARMON Receives Moderate Sentence - William HARMON of this village who had pleaded guiltily to maintaining a gambling house and trafficking in liquor illegally, was sentenced by Judge THOMPSON in county court Monday morning, to serve 3 months in Monroe County Penitentiary and pay a fine of $200 or stand committed one day for $2.00 thereof in the event of nonpayment.  The sentence is regarded as one of justice, tempered with mercy.  

HARMON was represented in court by Attorney John COLMEY, who presented a petition signed by 200 Victor citizens, asking for clemency.  Mr. COLMEY made a able plea for his client, asserting that while he was technically guilty of violating the law, he had not done so with malicious or evil intent, but rather through ignorance and with the desire to make a good fellow of himself.   He claimed that the :rake-off" was taken simply to pay the expenses of the beer and food serviced and that it was a kind of a club affair.  At the conclusion of Mr. COLMEY'S remarks, Judge THOMPSON stated that a number of those whose names were signed to the petition had written privately in opposition to its appeal.  He said that there could be but one law applicable to both Italians and Americans and announced that should prisoners hereafter appear before him convicted of conducting a gambling place, where the was a "rake-off", they would receive prison sentences.  

Ontario Co. Journal, Canandaigua, NY        Apr, 9, 1915                by Dianne Thomas

In Cheshire:

+ Miss Harriet HALL of Newark, NJ, spend several days with the family of her uncle, Frank A. HALL, last week.

+ Mr. & Mrs. HERRINGTON of East Bloomfield, were last week guests of Mr. & Mrs. Frank A. HALL.

+ N. E. HUTCHENS, is doing nicely.

+ Mrs. Roy MULLEN is ill.  Her mother Mrs. E. COYE, is with her.

+ Miss Irene COYE was taken to a Canandaigua hospital for treatment on Monday.

+ Mr. & Mrs. ATWATER and family were recently guests of Mr. & Mrs. N. H. ROGERS

+ Newton ROGERS of Cornell, spent his vacation with his parents here, returning on Monday. 

+ Mrs. CROSBY of the lakeshore, entertained friends last week, Thursday.

+ Miss STANDISH plans to spend a part of her vacation at Naples.  

+ Morton JONES has moved to his farm south of this place.

+ Dr. HUTCHENS is not improving as rapidly as his friends would like. 

+ Mr. & Mrs. Theodore FOSTER visited friends in Rushville the past week.  

+ Mrs. Hiram ISHAM, who has been very ill, is recovering slowly.

+ Mr. & Mrs. Martin HASKELL returned home on Monday, after a visit at Groton with the former's sister, Mrs. Milo MORAN.

+ Mr. & Mrs. Warren DAVIS attended the funeral of Mrs. Mary I. ROSE, widow of G. I. ROSE, at Bloomfield on Tuesday.  Mrs. ROSE had been with her daughter, Mrs. Charles DAVIS, a great share of the time and had made scores of friends.

Ontario County Journal       Friday,         May 7, 1915         Pg 5, col 6             by: Ron Hanley

Henry Chapin Pratt, a life long resident of this vicinity, passed away at his home on Scotland Road on Saturday morning, following an illness of several weeks.  Deceased was the son of Harvey and Elizabeth Hayes Pratt, and was born at Hopewell 63 years ago.  There survive four sisters, Misses Elizabeth, Anna and Jean Pratt, and Mrs. Frederick W. Latimer, all of Canandaigua.  The funeral services were held at his home on Monday afternoon.  Rev. Livingston L. Taylor officiated.  The bearers were J. A. Mc Cauley, F.W. Chesebro, Charles C. Sacket and Edward W. Simmons, of this city, Edward Wyckoff, of Rochester and Newton Wycoff of Perry.  Interment was in Woodlawn.

Democrat & Chronicle, Rochester, Monroe, NY           July 22, 1915         by: GSubyak@aol.com

Mrs. Mary R. ROCHFORD

Canandaigua - July 21 - The death of Mrs. Mary R. ROCHFORD, widow of Richard ROCHFORD, occurred in the Rochford home in Center street this morning.  She was a woman well along in years and leaves four daughters, Catherine, Anna, Alice and Julia ROCHFORD, and two sons, William and Richard.  The funeral will be held Friday morning at 9:30 o'clock from the Catholic Church with Rev. M. B. GRODEN officiating.

Rochester Democrat and Chronicle              Sunday,  August 1,  1915            by: Ron Hanley     


Bore Thirteen Children and Ran a Business Thirty-three Years,  active on Her Ninetieth Birthday

Although the span of her years is four score and ten, Mrs. Nancy McCormick who lives with her son William J. McCormick, at 457 Main Street West, has few of the infirmities that come with advanced age. Mrs. McCormick is today celebrating her ninetieth birthday and she said yesterday that she expected to enjoy the occasion fully as much as do her sons and daughters and the friends who are expected to drop in. There has been not a little action in Mrs. McCormick's life. She was born in Middlebury, Vt. on August 1, 1825, and a few years later her parents removed to Franklin Co. in this state. She was married to Francis McCormick at Sackett's Harbour in 1840, when she was but more than 15 years old.
Mrs. McCormick and her parents, Mr. and Mrs. McAdam, started from Franklin county for Rochester on a lake boat but her mother was so badly upset by the rough weather encountered that the captain of the boat refused to take the party farther than Sackett's Harbour. Mrs. McCormick's husband died in Canandaigua in 1868. Some years before his death he had established an ice business in that town, and Mrs. McCormick continued the business, conducting it for thirty-three years.  She was the first Business woman in Canandaigua and is well known in that place. When help was scarce she frequently did a man's work in the cutting and harvesting of ice.
Some years ago the town of Canandaigua built a pier into the lake, and Mrs. McCormick was made pier mistress, or toll collector, a fee being exacted from all vehicles that drove on the pier and from the boats that landed there. It was the duty of Mrs. McCormick to collect these fees, and it is a matter of record that she did her work well.
Mrs. McCormick had thirteen children, six of whom are living. Besides her son William J. McCormick, with whom she has made her home for eight years, she has two children in Rochester, Mrs. Owen Doyle and Mrs. Laura Koons. Her other living children, John McCormick, Mrs. Sarah Meath and Mrs. David Gentner, are in Canandaigua. Her oldest son, now dead, enlisted in the Civil war when he was 17 years old.
Except for difficulty in walking due to rheumatism, Mrs. McCormick is exceptionally active for a person who has attained her years. She is able to read without glasses and also to do tatting her favorite occupation. She says the counting necessary to tatting keeps her from thinking. She has an unusually retentive memory for things that happened long ago and is able to recite verses she learned as a child.  Mrs. McCormick has done considerable traveling. She visits Canandaigua a year ago and hopes to go again. She has a vivid recollection of the Civil war and says that the present European conflict impresses her as being a more horrifying struggle.  A small excerpt from an article about the pier, On the pier a small building on the left side served as a waiting room for the travelers. Next to it was a lunch room, known as " The Daisy" " operated by the Widow Nancy McCormick.  Known as a pioneer business woman of Canandaigua, she also ran an ice business and a small boat livery and served as toll collector for all vehicles which used the pier and all boats that landed there.


 ONTARIO COUNTY JOURNAL    Friday     August 6, 1915     Pg  4

FORMER RESIDENT PASSES 90th BIRTHDAY
Mrs. Nancy McCormack, Mother of Thirteen Children, Ran Ice Business Here 35 Years

Sunday morning's Rochester Democrat and Chronicle contained the following of a former well known Canandaiguan, Mrs. Nancy McCormack, whose long residence in this place made her a familiar personage to the older inhabitants of this city.  Although the span of her years is four score and ten, Mrs. Nancy McCormack, who lives with her son, William J. McCormack, at No. 457 Main Street west, has few of the infirmities that come with advanced age. Mrs. McCormack is today celebrating her 90th birthday, and she said yesterday that she expected to enjoy the occasion fully as much as do her sons and daughters, and the friends who are expected to drop in.
There has been not a little action in Mrs. McCormack's life. She was born at Middlebury, Vt., on August 1, 1825, and a few years later her parents removed to Franklin county, in this state. She was married to Francis McCormack at Sackett's Harbor, in 1840, when she was but a little more than 14 years old. Mrs. McCormack and her parents, Mr. and Mrs. McAdam, started from Franklin county for Rochester on a lake boat, but her mother was so badly upset by the rough weather encountered that the captain of the boat refused to take the party farther than Sackett's Harbor.  Mrs. McCormack's husband died in Canandaigua in 1868. Some years before his death he had established an ice business in that town, and Mrs. McCormack continued the business, conducting it for 33 years. She was the first business woman in Canandaigua and is well known in that place. When help was scarce, she frequently did a man's work in the cutting and harvesting of ice.
Some years ago the town of Canandaigua built a pier into the lake, and Mrs. McCormack was made pier mistress, or toll collector, a fee being exacted from all vehicles that drove on the pier and from the boats which landed there. It was the duty of Mrs. McCormack to collect these fees, and it is a matter of record that she did her work well.  Mrs. McCormack had 13 children, six of whom are living. Besides her son, William J. McCormack, with whom she has made her home for eight years, she has two other children in Rochester, Mrs. Owen Doyle and Mrs. Laura Koons. Her other living children, John McCormack, Mrs. Sarah Meath and Mrs. David Gentner, are in Canandaigua.  Her oldest son, now dead, enlisted in the Civil War when he was 17 years old.
Except for difficulty in walking due to rheumatism, Mrs. McCormack is exceptionally active for a person who has attained her years. She is able to read without glasses and also to do tatting, her favorite occupation. She says that the counting necessary to tatting keeps her from thinking. She has an unusually retentive memory for things which happened long ago, and is able to recite verses which she learned as a child.  Mrs. McCormack has done considerable traveling. She visited Canandaigua a year ago, and hopes to go again. She has vivid recollections of the Civil War, and says that the present European conflict impresses her as being a more horrifying struggle. 



ONTARIO COUNTY TIMES     Wednesday      August 4, 1915     Pg  8, col  4

AN  OLD  CANANDAIGUAN          Mrs. Nancy McCormack Celebrates Her Ninetieth Birthday
The men who were boys from thirty five to forty years ago will remember Nancy McCormack, they will remember her boat livery at the lake front and her big flat bottomed, square end row boats that she used to rent to them for 15 cents per hour, to go to the swimming hole at the Island. All these will be interested in the following, taken from the Democrat and Chronicle of Sunday.           (Same story as that written above from the Journal.) 

Democrat & Chronicle, Rochester, NY           Mon       Aug 23, 1915         by: GSubyak@aol.com

FRANK PERRY -  Canandaigua, Aug. 22 - After an illness of about a week, Frank PERRY died  in the Thompson Memorial Hospital here yesterday morning. He was 70 years old and a veteran of the Civil War. Mr. PERRY was well known about this city. He  leaves a son, John PERRY, of Canandaigua; two daughters, and a brother, Harvey PERRY, of Manchester.

FUNERAL OF MRS. SIDWAY - Canandaigua, Aug. 22 - The funeral of Mrs. Maria GIFFORD SIDWAY, wife of George SIDWAY, was held this afternoon from the late home in North Main street.  Mrs. SIDWAY leaves her husband and a daughter, Mrs. Cecil RAWLINGS, of this 
city. She was 76 years old. The interment was made in Woodlawn cemetery.

 ROCHESTER DEMOCRAT and CHRONICLE Tuesday August 24, 1915      by: Ron Hanley  
 
Granted Interlocutory Decree
 
Canandaigua  August 23 ---   Lena Engert Alger, of this city, has been granted an interlocutory decree of divorce from her husband, Steven O. Alger, a traveling salesman employed by a Massachusetts syrup company.
The decree was based upon evidence sworn to by another salesman of the company, who testified that Alger introduced as his wife at a Massachusetts hotel, a woman who was not Mrs. Alger. George A. Nicholson of this city, represented the plaintiff in this action. There are no
children.  The divorce will be made final and binding in three months.

ONTARIO COUNTY JOURNAL     Friday,  October 15, 1915  Front  Page             by: Ron Hanley    
 
 MEATH - BARRY
 
The marriage of P. Howard Meath and Miss Margaret Mary Barry, daughter of Mrs. Mary Barry, of Brighton Mass., took place at St. Mary's church on Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock.  Rev. James T. Dougherty performed the ceremony and celebrated mass in the presence of a large number of relatives and friends. 
The bride wore a gown of white crepe meteor with which she wore a white satin hat trimmed with ostrich. She was attended by her sister, Miss Helen Barry, of Brighton, Mass., who wore melon crepe meteor with hat of black velvet and carried Ophelia roses. The groom was attended by Edward Owens, of Medina. Ushers were Frank Monahan and Edward Donahue, of Canandaigua. During the ceremony Frank Sweeney, of Medina, sang " I Love You Truly" and also rendered an "Ave Maria" during the mass. Miss
Kathryn Farrell rendered the wedding music.  Following the wedding service breakfast was served at the home of the bride's aunt, Mrs. J. R. Meath, Granger Street. Palms, ferns and cosmos were used in the house decorations to carry out the color scheme of green and white. Covers were laid at the bride's table which was centered with the bridal bouquet.  After a two weeks trip to New York City and Brighton, Mass., Mr. and Mrs. Meath will reside on Granger Street. The bride's traveling suit was of navy blue poiret twill with which she wore a beaded blue velvet hat.

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