History of Ontario Co., NY  

 Published 1878

MEDICAL 

Chapter XXVI    Pg 63 - 66

Kindly transcribed by Donna Walker Judge & Deborah Spencer .  Thank you ladies!

Link to Epidemics in New York State

 

                    COUNTY MEDICAL SOCIETY                          

The labors of pioneer physicians were extremely arduous, and universal testimony is corroborative of their ability and humanity.  In accordance with an act passed by the Legislature, of date April 4, 1806, to incorporate medical societies in the State, and regulate the practice of physic and surgery, a meeting of the physicians of Ontario was held at the court-house in Canandaigua, on July 1 of the same year, to form such society for this county, and, at that time, Dr. Moses ATWATER was chosen president, Dr. Jacob DYER, vice-president, Dr. Daniel GOODWIN, treasurer, and Dr. Richard WELLS, secretary.  The State society was formed February 5, 1807, and Reuben HART was selected to represent the county society at Albany.  The time for holding annual meetings was set for July, and the following were constituted the first consors: Drs. DYER, HART, WELLS, and James CARTER.  The society met on July 12, 1814, and elected Dr. Nathaniel JACOBS, president, the second executive officer of the society.  At the same time, Dr. Charles LITTLE was chosen vice-president, Dr. Jeremiah ATWATER, treasurer, and Dr. R. WELLS, secretary.  The censors at this time were Drs. Stephen ALDRICH, Gain ROBINSON, James WHITE, Isaac SMITH, and Daniel BRAINARD, Jr.  The numbers of the society were augmented by the admission to membership of Drs. Joseph LORMER, Joseph MALLORY, Samuel B. BRADLEY, Philetus and David SPRAGUE, and Wyllis F. CLARK.  A revision of by-laws, as presented by a committee to that duty assigned, and consisting of Drs. WILCOX, JACOBS, and WELLS, was adopted in full.  Dudley MARVIN, of Canandaigua, and Nathan PARKE, of Geneva, were selected as attorneys for the society.  The organization met annually to transact business, and to take counsel upon matters of professional interest, and we will merely record the officials elected on July 8, 1817.  For President, Gain ROBINSON; Vice-President, Charles BINGHAM; Secretary, Richard WELLS; Treasurer, Jeremiah ATWATER; and for Censors, Drs. N. JACOB, 2d, Augustus TORREY, Charles BINGHAM, Erastus B. WOODWORTH, and Benjamin LOOMIS.




Asylums

Chapter XXVI    

pg 64 - 66

CLIFTON SPRINGS SANITARIUM is located in the village of Clifton Springs, town of Manchester.  The village lies on the New York Central Railroad, midway between Geneva and Canandaigua, and is one of the most healthy spots in the State.  At this place are two kinds of springs, fresh water and white sulphur, the latter being most numerous.  The sulphur springs contain carbonic acid in large quantities, which, in conjunction with lime, magnesia, and soda, constitutes elements favorable to successful treatment of chronic diseases.  Dr. Henry FOSTER came to the spot in 1849.  He found a wild wood and a morass, where for centuries the waters had gushed forth and ran their course.  Knowing the efficacy of water as a curative agent, Dr. FOSTER, in partnership with Rev. E. S. Davis, purchased ten acres, which included the springs, and which had been reserved by Oliver PHELPS as a possession of value.  The proprietors erected a double building of three stories, both structures under a common roof, and this was finished and patients received in 1850.  During the first year thirty patients had been treated, and the number began rapidly to increase.  In January, 1850, a company known as the Clifton Springs Water-Cure Association was formed, with a nominal stock of ten thousand five hundred dollars, which was paid in by the original stockholders.  The cost of the building, aside from that of furniture and the introduction of water, far exceeded the capital, and an oppressive debt was incurred equal to the original stock.  Dr. FOSTER meanwhile was not disheartened, but proceeded with the erection of a gymnasium and a sulphur bath-house, and to these added a chapel and a few dormitories.  The grounds were laid out, graded, and drained.  The mineral water was secured, and, with artistic design, ponds, lawns, walks, and flower-plats were constructed.  With increased accommodations came greater patronage, and not only was the debt lifted, but a reasonable dividend paid the stockholders.  An act of incorporation was passed by the Legislature on April 5, 1854, under the title, "The Clifton Springs Water-Cure Company."  Up to July, 1856, with the erection of buildings, the original cost had reached the sum of forty-one thousand dollars, all of which had been paid but seven thousand dollars.  The improvements made, the expense of the institution, and the erection of buildings called for a constant outlay of money, which from time to time was advanced by the doctor to the company until March 16, 1867, when, in accord with an amendatory act "to authorize such company to convey and transfer real and personal property on certain lands," the interest became vested in Dr. FOSTER.  The doctor now announced his intention to endow the institution with a fund, whose income would defray expenses of the medical faculty and steward.  The wealthy have always been received on equitable charges, while the minister and the poor have their treatment at the lowest possible rates.  On the 25th of July, 1856, the formal dedication of the water-cure took place.  The audience was called to order by Rev. L.P. HIKOK, D.D., of Union College, and the Hon. A. C. PAIGE, of Schenectady, was called to the chair.  Rev. B.F. TEFFT, then recently president of Genesee College, delivered the dedicatory address.  In the afternoon of the same day, the assembly re-convened and listened to the dedicatory sermon from Rev. M.L.P. Thompson, D.D., of Buffalo.  The chapel was occupied in the evening, and an address delivered by Judge PAIGE, president of the day.

The buildings of the establishment are of ample area and height.  They are the result of successive efforts.  A west wing was built next the wood building; it was soon raised a story with attics.  In 1870, the wood building was removed and the main building constructed, and improvements are still going forward.  Purchases of adjacent grounds have been made until sixty acres are now owned in connection with the Cure.  The valuation of property had been augmented so that it is estimated to be worth not less than a quarter of a million dollars.  The building presents a front of two hundred and thirty-five feet, four and five stories in height, the east wing being one hundred and the west wing three hundred feet deep.  Bathing arrangements and gymnasium are of superior character.

Upon the first floor of the main building is a dining-room with a capacity to seat three hundred and sixty persons; a drawing-room thirty-eight by forty-eight feet, a library and reading-room, medical office and reception-room, and bath-rooms, five in number.  Here is expensive machinery, and Turkish, electro and electro-chemical, Russian, compressed air, and vapor baths are taken.  Upon the second floor are two medical offices, three bath-rooms, rooms for patients, and a beautiful chapel, furnished with taste and supplied with a fine organ.  Other floors are devoted to guests.  There are rooms for two hundred and seventy patients, and many receiving treatment board at the hotels and boarding-houses in the village.  An elevator is in constant use.  The gymnasium is in dimension forty by one hundred feet.  There are three engines used for pumping water, and these are supplied with four boilers.  An ice-house has a capacity of one hundred tons; gas-works supply not only the institution, but the village.  Shops, barns, laundries, and other buildings are located upon the grounds.

The faculty consists of Dr. Henry FOSTER, general superintendent, assisted by Dr. James GAULT, Dr. PRINCE, and Mrs. Mary DUNBAR.  Rev. Lewis BODWELL has been chaplain since 1870.  The number of employees in the establishment is seventy-five.  These are classed in nine departments, each having a chief, who is responsible for the order of the division.  It is estimated that the number of patients during the twenty-six years past has exceeded fifty thousand.  Within the last few years the average constant number of patients is three hundred.  The institution does not depend for its growth upon advertising, but upon the good will and reports of patients, and by these means the reputation of the Cure has steadily increased.  On the 6th of April, 1871, the name was changed to Clifton Spring Sanitarium, which name it now bears.

A building known as Clifton Spring Hotel was purchased by a stock company, organized with a capital of seventy-five thousand dollars, and an extensive air-cure established.  It went into operation May 1, 1867, and met success.  It was destroyed by fire in 1870, and the property, including thirty acres of land, was purchased in 1872 by Dr. H. FOSTER with the intent to erect thereon a building to cost one hundred and fifty thousand dollars.  This is to be used as a nonsectarian female college.  School opens in the fall of 1876 in the Foster House, under charge of Dr. George H. Lewis, D.D., president.  The realization of this scheme will make Clifton Springs a place more than ever desirable as a residence.

 

 

BRIGHAM HALL, a hospital for the insane, owes its existence to private enterprise.  In 1854, Messrs. Robert D. and George COOK made their first visit to the village of Canandaigua, in search of a suitable location for their purpose.  They went out upon Main street on the morning after their arrival, and were shown by an old and prominent citizen the place so well suited to the design of the founders of the asylum.  During the day the premises were inspected, and proved satisfactory.  A stone building, known as the Brigham Place, was yet in process of construction, and showed solid and substantial.  It was of rural gothic build, fronted eastward, and forms the present centre of the structure.  The location is upon a site magnificently adorned by the hand of nature, and made yet more lovely by the refining influence of art.  From there a view is presented of village, valley, and lake.  Spring-water is unfailing, and the railroad station is but a mile distant.  The vicinity of Canandaigua lake as a place for boating and fishing made the place especially attractive, and excursions upon the clear and beautiful sheet of water have exerted a salutary and healing influence upon patients.  The purchase was made in June, 1855, and possession taken in July.  The unfinished stone building was completed in October, and rooms prepared for the reception of ten patients.  Early in the spring of 1856, in accordance with plans prepared, work was begun upon the north brick wing, which has a front of about one hundred and thirty feet, with rear extension; the latter has halls and rooms for a small number of excited patients.  It is two-storied, with partition-walls of brick, and has a capacity for thirty-five patients.  To provide adequate drainage, eight hundred feet of brick sewer were constructed, and pipes for water and gas were laid through the whole buildings.  The south wing was built in 1860, in size and style like the north wing.  The entire building has a front of three hundred and twenty feet, with a rear extension of one hundred and thirty feet, for kitchen, laundry, and engine-rooms.  The building has been erected and furnished with the one purpose constantly in view,---the comfort and welfare of inmates.  Supply of water is unfailing.  A reservoir twenty by thirty, and eight feet deep, has been built at the spring.  The walls are laid in brick and cement, and covered in for purity.  A suction-pipe three inches in diameter extends from the reservoir to the pump, which is propelled by steam power, and thence water is forced to large tanks in the attic.  Gas-works were constructed in 1866, and have been changed as found desirable.  Crude petroleum produces a good quality of gas at moderate cost.  The original purchase was of seventy acres.  In 1865, thirty acres, between the hospital grounds and Parrish street, were purchased, increasing the acreage to one hundred.  Streets bound the grounds on all sides, and give security against encroachment.  The forest-trees of fifteen acres about the hospital have been left standing, and evergreen and other trees have been planted.  The objects of the institution have been the cure of every patient who may be cured, and the provision to the incurable of all the care, peace, comfort, and enjoyment within their reach.  The proportion of recoveries to the number treated has been large, and the freedom from irksome restraint has made life more enjoyable.  Since the opening of the hospital in 1855, one thousand and thirty-four patients have been admitted; three hundred and twenty-one of these have been discharged fully recovered; two hundred and forty-six improved; two hundred and eighteen unimproved; eight-eight were inebriates; ninety have died, and seventy-one remained under care December 31, 1875.  During the last ten months of the year no death occurred.  The fact is developed that before the larger number of patients are brought here, they have passed beyond the reach of curative agency.  The board of managers consists of Robert D. COOK, Esq., William G. WAYNE, Esq., and John B. CHAPIN, M.D.  Dr. Harvey JEWETT, consulting physician, is constantly referred to as a person of extended experience and of unvarying courtesy.  It was a noteworthy fact that for more than twenty years the founders of the hospital continued to administer its affairs.  Dr. George COOK, a man of noble nature and generous impulses, of quiet manner, but strong influence, took exclusive management of the business, financial and medical.  The unfortunate were sent to his care by relatives with confidence, and the citizens of Canandaigua held the doctor as one whom they delighted to honor.  He died a martyr to the cause of humanity, by a knife-stroke inflicted by a patient.  The assault was made on June 12, 1876, and in his death the unfortunate lost of a valuable friend.

 

 

ONTARIO ORPHAN ASYLUM  - This institution is located at the head of Main street, in the village of Canandaigua, just outside the corporation limits, in the midst of a beautiful grove of forest-trees, having four acres of land attached.

On the 14th of May, 1863, a public meeting was held at the town hall in said village, in pursuance of a call from the patriotic and benevolent ladies of the county, to provide a suitable home for destitute and orphan children, with especial reference to those whose fathers might be lost in the service of the United States during the late war of the rebellion.  A society was duly organized, which afterwards became incorporated by the Legislature.  A constitution and by-laws were adopted, providing for the annual election of a president, treasurer, two secretaries, four directresses, twenty-four managers (subsequently increased to forty-four), all from the ladies of the society.

A suitable house and grounds were purchased for $5000, a matron and teacher secured, and the doors were opened for the reception of inmates.  Twenty-five thousand dollars was received from the State; occasional appropriations have been generously voted by the supervisors of the county, authorized by the Legislature; small legacies have been realized from Mrs. Isabella FULTON, of Phelps, and Mrs. E.S. COBB and Mrs. James LYON, of Canandaigua, while the liberal and continuous support of its patrons has thus far contributed to make a success of this noble charity.  Several legacies of considerable amount have done much towards placing the asylum on a permanent basis, yet its maintenance is largely dependent on the liberality of its friends.

In 1868, the supervisors of Yates county made arrangements to transfer their dependent children to this asylum from their county-house, while recent legislation has more fully provided for the removal of pauper children to this and similar institutions.

The edifice is a three-story brick building, having a basement and mansard roof, with a spacious veranda in front; the whole having been greatly enlarged and improved in 1870, at an expense $13,581.61, making the total cost of the real estate $19,581.61, the entire sum having been raised by the individual exertions of the ladies, and the property is entirely free from incumbrance.

There are now about sixty children in the asylum, which will accommodate a hundred.  Over three hundred have been received since its commencement.

One of the most interesting features of the institution is the asylum school.  The neatness, decorum, and good order which prevail reflect much credit upon matron and teacher, while the intellectual progress of the children will challenge competition with those of same age who are blessed with better fortune.  Suitable homes are provided for the pauper children when practicable, whose future welfare is strictly guarded by proper indentures.

There is also a board of trustees, seven in number, chosen annually from the male members of the society, who hold in trust, for the benefit of the asylum, the title to the real and personal property.

 List of Funded Legacies.

June 1, 1867, Miss Betsey CHAPIN.........................................................$4,000

October 9, 1871, Mrs. Clarissa M. DAVIS...................................................2,000

October 23, 1873, John POST..................................................................20,000

March 8, 1876, Perez H. FIELD..................................................................1,000

_____________________________________________________________________

                                                                                                           $27,000

 

Invested as follows:

United States 3 per cent. Bonds, par value.....................................$10,000

United States 6 per cent. Bonds, par value.....................................   3,600

Premium on above........................................................................       2,940

Bonds and Mortgages...................................................................     10,460

______________________________________________________________

                                                                                                            $27,000

These legacies have been preserved intact, and form a permanent endowment fund, the interest only being used towards the current expenses of the asylum.  The net income from this fund is $1448, while the yearly expenses of the institution are $4500, leaving an annual deficiency of $3000 to be supplied by public generosity.

Officers of the Asylum, May, 1876.---President, Mrs. George COOK; Directresses, Mrs. Alexander MURRAY, Mrs. George WILLSON, Mrs. Harvey JEWETT, Mrs. George W. BEMIS; Treasurer, Mrs. Henry M. FIELD; Recording Secretary, Miss Annie PIERCE; Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. William GORHAM.

Trustees.---Messrs. A.H. HOWELL, president; F.F. THOMPSON, treasurer; Lucius WILCOX, George COOK, M.D., (died 12th June, 1876), Harvey JEWETT, H.O. CHESEBRO, Hon. C.J. FOLGER.

 

 

 

History of Ontario County, NY 

Published 1893           pg 179 - 193

  Compiled by Lewis Cass Aldrich; Edited by George S. Conover

CHAPTER XIV 

THE MEDICAL PROFESSION IN ONTARIO COUNTY 

The medical profession of Ontario county has preserved but little of its early history, and while there are a few meager records from which we may learn the proceedings of the general and local societies that have been formed, there are no data upon which can be based a faithful history of the developments of the profession.  Added to this the county Medical Society has to acknowledge the loss of its earliest record books, and such facts as are gleaned of its early membership rest largely upon the uncertain memory of man, and still less reliable tradition.  However, there has been incidentally preserved a list of the pioneer physicians of the county, while the records from 1842 to the present time are in existence. 

The medical science, which now sheds its light throughout the world and does so much to ameliorate suffering, began with Hippocrates nearly 2300 years ago, and he first treated of medicine with the simplest remedies, relying chiefly on the healing powers of nature.  He wrote extensively, and some of his works have been translated and served as a foundation for the succeeding literature of the profession.  But it must be said that the greatest advance in medical science has been made during the last 100 years, and chiefly during the last half century. 

Botanists are now acquired with 150,000 plants, of which a large proportion are being constantly added to the already appalling list of new remedies.  Many of the latter possess little if any virtue, yet by liberal advertising they hold a place in nearly every drug store.  The ancients were not so well supplied with drugs, and hence they resorted to other methods.  For instance, it is said that the Babylonians exposed their sick to the view of passers-by in order to learn of them whether they had been afflicted with a like distemper, and by that remedies they had been cured.  It was also a custom of those days for all persons who had been sick to put up a tablet in the temple of Esculapius, whereon they gave an account of the remedies by which they had been restored.  Prior to Hippocrates all medicines were administered by priests and were associated with numerous superstitions, such as charms, amulets and incantations; sympathetic ointments were applied to the weapon with which a wound was made; human or horseflesh was used for the cure of epilepsy, and convulsions were treated with human brains.  It may be added that the credulous superstitions of early ages has not been fully wiped out, even by the advanced medical education of the present day.  One of the latest appeals to the credulity of the masses is an invention to relieve the unfortunate sick, and known as "Christian Science" and "Faith Cure," but so long as filth brings fever, prayer will not avail, and those who advocate any such method of cure are either self deceived or are deceiving others. 

It is not, however, the purpose of this chapter to treat of ancient or even modern medical history, and though a review of the progress of this science from the time of the Egyptian medical deities, or the Greek or Roman medical mythology, would be very interesting as well as instructive, it is not pertinent to the medical history of Ontario county, and the foregoing introductory observations are merely to suggest to the reader the difference between the ancient and modern means of healing. 

The settlement of the region now included in Ontario county began about the year 1790, and thereafter progressed very rapidly for more than a quarter of a century.  At that time, and indeed for a number of years afterward, the facilities for obtaining a medical education were very limited.  The State of New York, quite unlike New England and Pennsylvania, had done very little to encourage science, and there were no schools of medicine worthy of the name nearer than Boston or Philadelphia; and few young men could afford to go so far to qualify themselves for a profession which then offered but little pecuniary inducement, hence the prevailing custom was for the medical aspirant to enter the office of some neighboring physician and read for two or three years, at the same time accompanying his tutor in his professional visits and learned his methods of treatment.  At the end of the term the young doctor would seek some promising field and begin practice.   

The legislation which then regulated the admission and practice of physicians was so defective as to be really worthless.  However, in 1806 an act was passed repealing all former laws governing the profession, and at the same time authorizing a general "State Medical Society," and also county societies.  The Ontario County Medical Society was organized in 1806 in accordance with the provision of the act above referred to, but the profession of the present day has to lament the loss of the early records of the society, a fact which deprives us of much interesting and valuable information.  However, the society was organized upon the general plan laid down in the act of 1806, and was given the power to regulate the practice and the admission of physicians in the county.  Its first officers, or indeed any record of its proceedings prior to 1842, are not obtainable, it being understood that the minute book was destroyed by fire.  Notwithstanding this loss, a stray leaf from an old record is found, from which we learn the names of the early physicians of the county, but there is nothing by which can be determined the date of the entry.  

For the purpose, therefore, of bringing to the attention of the reader the names of as many as possible of the older physicians of the county, the names on the leaf are copied in full.  "List of those who do now or have belonged to the Ontario County Medical Society:  Moses ATWATER, Richard WELLS, Nathan RAYMOND, Jared DYER, Joel PRESCOTT, Daniel GOODWIN, John DORMAN, Reuben HART, Buffum HARKNESS, Jeremiah ATWATER, Thomas VINCENT, Silas NEWCOMB, James CARTER, Robert W. ASHLEY, Joshua LEE, Stephen ALDRICH, Seth TUCKER, Hubbard CRITTENDEN, Richard TAYLOR, William WHITE, Jonas WYMAN, Benjamin A. PARSONS, Gain ROBINSON, Cyrus CHIPMAN, John RAY, Justus SMITH, Daniel ARMS, David FAIRCHILD, Samuel STEVENS, Ralph WILCOX, Charles BINGHAM, Isaac M. MORGAN, E. B. WOODWORTH, John CAMPBELL, Eli HILL, Charles LITTLE, William S. RICHARDS, Jason ANGEL, Isaac BALCOM, Henry P. HECOCK, Orin LEE, Jonah D. SIMONDS, Lyman N. COOK, Isaac SMITH, Jonathan GRIFFIN, W. L. NEWCOMB, William BROWN, James WHITE, Calvin FARGO, Oliver BUTRICK, Thomas BEACH, Daniel BRAINERD, Nathaniel JACOB, Benjamin TUCKER, John DELAMATER, Joseph MALLORY, Joseph LOOMER, Samuel B. BRADLEY, Philetus SPRAGUE, Samuel DUNGAN, David SPRAGUE, Willis F. CLARK, Alexander KELSEY, James THAYER, Augustus TORREY, Otis HIGGINS, Augustus FRANK, Berkley GILLETT, A. WOOLCOTT, Hartwell CARVER, Josiah LANE, William R. ELLIS, A. G. SMITH, C. C. COON, Pliny HAYES, William A. WILLIAMS, Harvey PETTIBONE, Andrew HUNTINGTON, Chauncey BEADLE, Ezekiel WEBB, Jonathan GUERNSEY, Samuel HAMILTON, Lewis HODGES, W. A. COWDRY, F. VANDERBERG, Enoch CHENEY, Samuel DANIELS, Ira BRYANT, Adolphus ALLEN, Janna HOLTON, Henry P. SARTWELL, Jonathan HURLBUT, Linus STEVENS, Alex. McINTYRE, Elisha BROWN, Silas DUNHAM, Oliver REYNOLDS, Thomas WILLIAMS, Benjamin BEMIS, Archibald BURNETT, Ephraim W. CHENEY, Andrew WOOD, William FRISBIE, Cyrus BUTTON, James LAKEY, Jesse WOOD, Joel AMSDEN, Jacob GILLETT, jr., Henry C. HICKOK, Josiah BENNETT, Isaac BEERS, Martyn PAINE, Elisha WARNER, Samuel BORROWE, jr., Wynans BUSH, Francis DEAN, Jedediah SMITH, Philip N. DRAPER, Edwin ANGEL, Gardner WHEELER, Edson CARR, Benjamin F. POST, John GILBERT, Elijah SEDGWICK, Asahel BEACH, William A. TOWNSEND, Elias W. FRISBIE, William C. GOODING, Daniel A. ROBINSON, James STEWART, Caleb BANNISTER, Jonathan PRATT, George BURCH, Samuel CHIPMAN, Enoch PECK, Ira S. BARBER, Stillman RALPH, James DAVIS, Willard DOOLITTLE, Albert G. BRISTOL, Lester JEWETT, Wm. H. HALL, Harvey JEWETT, S. V. R. BOGART, Daniel HUDSON, William F. SHELDON, Joel GRAY, William HOLLAND, Lucius W. CRITTENDEN, Phineas A. ROYCE, Thaddeus GARLICK, F. C. BATEMAN, Erasmus D. POST, Luther HECOCK, Royal GURLEY, G. L. ROSE, N. J. SMITH, Booth NORTHRUP, Edward CUTBUSH, John STAATS, C. F. BROWER, John CURRIE, Daniel D. DAYTON, Jonathan BURT, E. W. SIMMONS. 

In 1852 the society was substantially reorganized, and new by-laws were adopted at that time.  However, about that period certain dissensions arose among the members, said to have been the result of unfavorable legislation, and no meetings were held thereafter until 1857.  At the latter date the society was revived, and the members subscribed to the by-laws adopted prior to the disruption.  The following is a list of the physicians who signed the roll, but in explanation it must be said that many names were added as applicants became members of the society.  Therefore the membership under the constitution and by laws of 1852 was about as follows:  E. W. CHENEY, Edson CARR, Harvey JEWETT, John STAFFORD, J. Richmond PRATT, Daniel T. WEBSTER, Hazard A. POTTER, Elon G. CARPENTER, C. H. CARPENTER, Daniel DURGAN, M. C. K. CROOKS, J. W. PALMER, Charles N. HEWETT, T. O. BANNISTER, H. HAMILTON, Z. PAUL, Thomas A. BROWN, W. Scott HICKS, B. MONAHAN, David J. MALLORY, Charles C. MURPHY, P. D. PETTIER, H. N. EASTMAN, F. GLAUNER, Mitchell H. PICOT, Byron T. WHEELER, H. Fay BENNETT, R. A. CARNCROSS, John O. PALMER, M. W. ARCHER, E. W. SIMMONS, John Q. HOWE, Joseph T. SMITH, Edwin R. MAXSON, L. F. WILBUR, George COOK, F. G. BENTLEY, William T. SWART, A. G. CRITTENDEN, F. B. SEELYE, James H. ALLEN, M. N. CARSON, I. Ackley GRAY, D. D. DAYTON, L. SPRAGUE, George N. DOX, J. T. ROGERS, A. B. SNOW, J. B. HAYES, C. H. WOOD, John B. CHAPIN, J. I. DENMAN, James PARMELY, Jr., W. Fitch CHENEY, L. B. LESTER, L. Y. PHINNEY, W. A. CARSON, D. G. WEARE, J. P. AVERY, A. R. SHANK, F. D. VANDERHOOF, S. W. WEST, H. K. CLARK, M. D. SKINNER, H. C. GORHAM, Charles C. EASTMAN, G. H. WHEELOCK, ____ FLOOD, Charles MUDGE, E. A. HOLLISTER, G. H. VAN DEUSEN, Fred. T. WEBSTER, G. S. GALLAGHER, James F. DRAPER, Charles R. DRYER, F. W. MAILLER, Ellis B. SAYRE, Le Roy LEWIS, Herbert M. EDDY, John H. JEWETT, Dwight R. BURRELL, J. Henry BUDD, Alfred M. MEAD, O. J. HALLENBECK, C. O. JACKSON, W. F. EDINGTON, A. D. ALLEN, T. D. RUPERT, George E. FLOOD, N. L. KEITH, John HUTCHINS, W. A. HUBBARD, Frank L. WILLSON, Albert L. BEAHAN, George W. SARGENT, J. B. BURROUGHS, Frank H. INGRAM, J. Pope DE LANEY, John J. McNULTY, James H. HASLETT, Horace B. GEE, R. W. WALMSLEY, C. R. MARSHALL, John A. ROBSON, S. R. WHEELER, Bradford C. LOVELAND, G. W. McCLELLAN, Wm. A. HOWE, C. D. McCARTHY, J. B. FINUCAN, John H. PRATT, C. R. KEYES, F. E. McCLELLAN, Robert L. CARSON, Charles A. VAN DER BECK, Frank R. PRATT, Edgar O. CROSSMAN, C. C. THAYER, Harry C. BUELL, F. B. RASBACK.

 

As has been stated the society held no regular meetings between 1852 and 1857, but in the last mentioned year the “Medical Profession of Ontario County” held a meeting for the purpose of reorganizing the virtually defunct society. From that time until the present, regular meetings have been held, and the society has enjoyed a reasonably prosperous existence. The present membership numbers about fifty regular practicing physicians of the county, as follows:    

A.D. ALLEN, Gorham

B.C. LOVELAND, Clifton Springs.

J. H. ALLEN, Gorham

A.M. MARSH, Victor.

D. S. ALLEN, Gorham

G. W. MC CLELLAN, Canandaigua.

Albert L. BEAHAN, Canandaigua.

F. E. MC CLELLAN, Canandaigua.

F. P. BELL, Naples.

C.D. MC CARTHY, Geneva.

D. R. BURRELL, Canandaigua.

H. W. NICHOLS, Canandaigua.

J. B. BURROUGHS, Shortsville.

John Richmond PRATT, Manchester

H. C. BUELL, Canandaigua.

John Hahn PRATT, Manchester

M. R. CARSON, Canandaigua

Frank Richmond PRATT, Manchester

Robert L. CARSON, Canandaigua.

T. D. RUPERT, Geneva

Edgar O. CROSSMAN, Clifton Springs

F. B. RASBACK, Phelps

J. Pope DE LANEY, Geneva.

George W. SARGENT, Seneca Castle.

J. F. DRAPER, Victor.

John C. SMITH, Clifton Springs.

H. M. EDDY, Geneva.

E. B. SAYRE, Allens’s Hill.

L. E. GREEN, Honeoye.

E.W. SIMMONS, Canandaigua.

O. J. HALLENBECK, Canandaigua.

C.C. THAYER, Clifton Springs.

W. G. HEMIUP, Geneva.

George H. VAN DUSEN, Gorham.

W. A. HOWE, Phelps.

F. D. VANDERHOOF, Phelps.

W. S. HICKS, Bristol.

C.A. VAN DER BECK, Canandaigua.

John HUTCHINS, Cheshire.

L. F. WILBUR, Honeoye.

C.O. JACKSON, Victor.

R. W. WALMSLEY, Canandaigua.

J. H. JEWETT, Canandaigua.

S.R. WHEELER, East Bloomfield.

C.R. KEYES, Geneva.

F. B. WEITLING, Naples.

The officers, president and secretary, of the Ontario County Medical Society from 1842 to 1793 (exclusive of the years from 1852 to 1857) have been as follows:

 

President

Secretary

1842

Henry P. HICKOK

Franklin B. HAHN

1843

Enos BARNES

Franklin B. HAHN

1844

Enos BARNES

Daniel T. WEBSTER

1845

Edson CARR

Owen MUNSON

1846

Nathaniel JACOB

Owen MUNSON

1847

Harvey JEWETT

Owen MUNSON

1848

Daniel T. WEBSTER

Edson CARR

1849

Erastus B. WOODWORTH

Edson CARR

1850

T.G. MEACHAM

Edson CARR

1851

T.G. MEACHAM

Edson CARR

1858

Edson CARR

J.T. SMITH

1859

E.W. CHENEY

J.T. SMITH

1860

Z. PAUL

J.T. SMITH

1861

G.N. DOX

J.T. SMITH

1862

George COOK

J.T. SMITH

1863

F.R. BENTLEY

J.B. HAYES

1864

H.N. EASTMAN

J.B. HAYES

1865

C.C. MURPHY

J.B. HAYES

1866

J.W. PALMER

J.B. HAYES

1867

A.G. CRITTENDEN

J.B. HAYES

1868

L. F. WILBUR

J.B. HAYES

1869

James H. ALLEN

J.B. HAYES

1870

C.H. WOOD

J.B. HAYES

1871

F.D. VANDERHOOF

J.B. HAYES

1872

E.W. SIMMONS

J.B. HAYES

1873

H.K. CLARK

J.B. HAYES

1874

J.T. SMITH

J.B. HAYES

1875

W.S. HICKS

J.B. HAYES

1876

S.W. WEST

J.B. HAYES

1877

Harvey JEWETT

J.B. HAYES

1878

James FLOOD

J.B. HAYES

1879

H.W. NICHOLS

J.H. JEWETT

1880

J.B. HAYES

J.H. JEWETT

1881

D.S. ALLEN

J.H. JEWETT

1882

J.R. PRATT

F.D. VANDERHOOF

1883

J.H. BUDD

F.D. VANDERHOOF

1884

J.H. BUDD

F.D. VANDERHOOF

1885

E.O. HOLLISTER

F.D. VANDERHOOF

1886

G.H. VAN DEUSEN

F.D. VANDERHOOF

1887

C.O. JACKSON

F.D. VANDERHOOF

1888

J.B. BURROUGHS

F.D. VANDERHOOF

1889

M.R. CARSON

F.D. VANDERHOOF

1890

A.D. ALLEN

F.D. VANDERHOOF

1891

F.D. VANDERHOOF

J.H. JEWETT

1892

S.R. WHEELER

J.H. JEWETT

The Homoeopathic Medical Society of the Counties of Ontario and Yates was organized at an informal meeting of homoeopathic physicians held at the office of Dr. O.S. WOOD in Canandaigua on the 16th of October, 1861. According to the Constitution, any regularly licensed physician “who has complied with the requisitions of the laws of the State of New York, and who shall avow his belief in the homoeopathic maxim, similia similibus curanter, may be elected a member of the society,” etc.

The Constitution of the society was signed by a large proportion of the homoeopathic practitioners of the counties of Ontario and Yates, and the name given above was continued in use until October 16th, 1889, when an amendment to the Constitution was adopted by which the name was changed to The Homoeopathic Medical Society of Ontario County.

The original Constitution was signed by these physicians: Oliver E. NOBLE, H. Fay BENNETT, O.S. WOOD, H.W. SMITH, George Z. NOBLE, M.W. COMBS, S.W. WEST, J.H. STEBBINS, E.B. HOLMES, E.W. ROGERS, J.B. VOAK, J.A. HAWLEY, N.B. COVERT, A.B. SMITH, T.D. PRICHARD, C.T. MITCHELL, George C. PRICHARD, R.B. COVERT, E.W. BRYAN, Frank TOMPKINS, Henry FOSTER, Cyrus ALLEN, Hylon DOTY, Cassius H. GREEN, A. IMESON, W.R. TOWNSEND, A.J. FRANTZ, George H. CHURCH, E.D. SMITH, V.A. LEWIS, W.A. WHEELER, Frank E. MURPHY, John Dudley COOKE, Frank P. WARNER, James C. KNAPP, Fred H. LUTZE, Henry P. PERKINS, jr.

The first officers elected were: Oliver E. NOBLE, president; H. Fay BENNETT, vice-president; O.S. WOOD, secretary and treasurer; G.Z. NOBLE, M.W. COMBS and H.W. SMITH, censors; G.Z. NOBLE and H. Fay BENNETT, delegates to State Society.

 

The succession of presidents and secretaries has been as follows:

 

President

Secretary

1861

Oliver E. NOBLE

O.S. WOOD.

1862

Oliver E. NOBLE.

O.S. WOOD.

1863

Oliver E. NOBLE.

O.S. WOOD.

1864

Oliver E. NOBLE.

O.S. WOOD.

1865

Oliver E. NOBLE.

O.S. WOOD.

1866

Oliver E. NOBLE.

J.B. VOAK.

1867

Oliver E. NOBLE.

J.B. VOAK.

1868

T.D. PRICHARD.

G.Z. NOBLE.

1869

T.D. PRICHARD.

G.Z. NOBLE.

1870

J.H. STEBBINS.

G.Z. NOBLE.

1871

J.H. STEBBINS.

G.Z. NOBLE.

1872

J.B. VOAK.

G.Z. NOBLE.

1873

J.B. VOAK.

G.Z. NOBLE.

1874

J.B. VOAK.

G.Z. NOBLE.

1875

J.B. VOAK.

G.Z. NOBLE.

1876

J.B. VOAK.

G.Z. NOBLE.

1877

Nelson B. COVERT.

G.C. PRICHARD.

1878

George Z. NOBLE.

G.C. PRICHARD.

1879

George Z. NOBLE.

G.C. PRICHARD.

1880

C.T. MITCHELL.

G.C. PRICHARD.

1881

C.T. MITCHELL.

G.C. PRICHARD.

1882

C.T. MITCHELL.

G.C. PRICHARD.

1883

Henry FOSTER.

G.C. PRICHARD.

1884

Henry FOSTER.

G.C. PRICHARD.

1885

Henry FOSTER.

G.C. PRICHARD.

1886

Henry FOSTER.

G.C. PRICHARD.

1887

Frank P. WARNER.

G.C. PRICHARD.

1888

G.C. PRICHARD.

C.T. MITCHELL.

1889

G.C. PRICHARD.

C.T. MITCHELL.

1890

G.C. PRICHARD.

C.T. MITCHELL.

1891

G.C. PRICHARD.

C.T. MITCHELL.

1892

J.C. KNAPP.

C.T. MITCHELL.

Present Membership: Henry FOSTER and F.P. WILCOX, of Clifton Springs; George C. PRICHARD, of Phelps; J.H. STEBBINS, Nelson B.

188

COVERT, A.B. SMITH and J.C. KNAPP, of Geneva; C.T. MITCHELL and F.P. WARNER, of Canandaigua; J.D. COOKE, of Shortsville; G.H. CHURCH, of Oak’s Corners; B.S. PARTRIDGE, of East Bloomfield; C.A. ROWLEY, of Victor.

The Society of Physicians of the Village of Canandaigua was organized on the 20th of December, 1864, with an original membership of ten, as follows: M.R. CARSON, John B. CHAPIN, W. Fitch CHENEY, George COOK, Harvey JEWETT, J.B. HAYES, J.F. ROGERS, E.W. SIMMONS, J.T. SMITH and W.T. SWART. The first officers were E.W. SIMMONS, president; Harry JEWETT, vice-president; J.B. HAYES, secretary.

The object of the society, as declared by the articles of association, is “to promote the scientific improvement and social fellowship of its members; to preserve the unity and to maintain the dignity and honor of the profession.”

The honorary members, elected soon after the organization of the society, included these persons: Benjamin RICHARDS, A.M.; E.C. TYLER, A.M.; N.T. CLARK, A.M., Ph. D.; William S. ZANTZINGER, M. D.; John ROSEWARNE, M.D.; Alexander MURRAY, M.D.; and Charles S. HOYT, M.D.

The Society of Physicians has been in all respects a useful and worthy organization, and has enjoyed an uninterrupted prosperity of nearly thirty years’ duration. However, its greater step forward was taken on the 26th of December, 1892, when the society was incorporated, thus acquiring recognition by and standing in the State Medical Society. In this connection we may also note the fact that the Canandaigua Society is not only a pioneer in its class, but was one of the first in the State to become incorporated. The active spirits of the incorporation measure were the following physicians: Matthew R. CARSON, Orlando J. HALLENBECK, Albert L. BEAHAN, Charles A. VAN DER BECK and John H. JEWETT, each of whose names are subscribed to the articles of association.

From the time of its original organization (in 1864) the active officers of the society have been as follows:

 

President 

Secretary 

1864  (1)

E.W. SIMMONS.

J.B. HAYES.

1866

Harvey JEWETT.

J.B. HAYES.

(1)  Elected in December, 1864, and served to January, 1866  

1867

J.T. SMITH.

J.B. HAYES.

1868

W.T. SWART.

J.B. HAYES.

1869

J.B. CHAPIN.

J.B. HAYES.

1870

M.R. CARSON.

J.B. HAYES.

1871

J.B. HAYES.

H.C. GORHAM.

1872

George COOK.

W.T. SWART.

1873

E.W. SIMMONS.

W.T. SWART.

1874

Harvey JEWETT.

W.T. SWART.

1875

J.T. SMITH.

M.R. CARSON

1876

W.T. SWART.

M.R. CARSON

1877

M.R. CARSON.

J.B. HAYES.

1878

J.B. HAYES.

M.R. CARSON

1879

E.W. SIMMONS.

M.R. CARSON

1880

D.R. BURRELL.

M.R. CARSON

1881

D. NICHOLS.

J.H. JEWETT

1882

E.G. TYLER.

J.H. JEWETT

1883

N.T. CLARKE.

J.H. JEWETT

1884

W.F. SWART.

J.H. JEWETT

1885

J.B. HAYES.

A.L. BEAHAN

1886

Charles S. HOYT.

A.L. BEAHAN

1887

J.H. JEWETT.

A.L. BEAHAN

1888

O.J. HALLENBECK.

A.L. BEAHAN

1889

R.W. WALMSLEY.

A.L. BEAHAN

1890

J.B. HAYES.

A.L. BEAHAN

1891

Charles A. VAN DER BECK.

O.J. HALLENBECK.

1892

A.L. BEAHAN.

O.J. HALLENBECK

1893

M.R. CARSON.

O.J. HALLENBECK.

Present Members of the Society—M.R. CARSON, president; J.H. JEWETT, vice president; O.J. HALLENBECK, secretary and treasurer; H.C. BUELL, Noah T. CLARKE, D.R. BURRELL, C.N. VAN DER BECK, R.W. WALMSLEY, A.L BEAHAN.

Under an act of the Legislature passed in 1880, each physician in the county (in each county in the State) was required to register in the office of the county clerk his name, place of birth, residence, date of diploma, and the institution from which he was graduated, or the authority by which he claimed the right to practice medicine in the county.  In compliance with the requirements of the act there has been a very general registration by the physicians of this county, and in order to bring to the notice of the reader the names of as many as possible of the past and present medical practitioners, we extract from the records the names, with other data referred to, of those legally qualified to practice medicine in Ontario county since the law was passed: 

Elnathan W. SIMMONS, born in Bristol; authority to practice granted by the Regents of the University of the State of New York, January 23, 1834. 

John H. JEWETT, born at Canandaigua; diploma February 28, 1879, from College of Physicians and Surgeons of New York city. 

Frederic C. HAWLEY, born Middlesex, Yates county; diploma February 16, 1854, from Syracuse Medical College. 

Ira F. HAWLEY, born in Middlesex; diploma March 28, 1878, from the American University of Philadelphia. 

J. Richmond PRATT, born Manchester; diploma March 8, 1851, from Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia. 

Andrew MERRILL, born Utica, NY; diploma June 20, 1851, from Geneva Medical College. 

William TEMPLAR, born Steuben county; diploma March 23, 1854, by Medical Society of Yates county. 

David J. MALLERY, born Cayuga county; diploma January 26, 1847, from Geneva Medical College. 

Ziba H. POTTER, born Yates county; diploma January 22, 1867, from Geneva Medical College. 

Francis R. BENTLEY, born Onondaga county; diploma January 26, 1840, from Geneva Medical College. 

Orlando J. HALLENBECK, born Schenectady county; diploma February 1, 1879, from Albany Medical College. 

Alfred M. MEAD, born Wayne county; diploma February 25, 1880, from Buffalo University. 

James A. HAWLEY, born in Middlesex, Yates county; diploma June 4, 1879, from Genesee Valley District Eclectic Medical Society and Eclectic Medical College of Philadelphia. 

William BELL, born Gorham; diploma June 4, 1879, from Genesee Valley District Eclectic Medical Society.

Leonidas F. WILBUR, born Windham county, Vt.; diploma March 4, 1854, from Harvard University, Boston, Mass. 

Duncan S. ALLEN, born Montgomery county; diploma December 26, 1865, from Albany Medical College. 

Le Roy LEWIS, born Seneca Falls, diploma March 16, 1868, from Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa. 

John Q. HOWE, born Wayne county; diploma June 10, 1842, from Berkshire Medical School, Pittsfield, Mass. 

Mitchell H. PICOT, born Philadelphia, Pa.; diploma March 9, 1861, from Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Joseph T. SMITH, born Farmington; diploma March 9, 1854, from Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa. 

William T. SWART born Gorham; diploma February 24, 1847, from Western Reserve College at Hudson, O. 

Henry W. NICHOLS, born Addison county, Vt.; diploma January 25, 1845, from Geneva Medical College. 

Henry S. DIMOCK, born Phelps; diploma August 30, 1880, from Eclectic Medical College of New York city. 

Peter P. VAN VLEET, born Seneca county; diploma March 1, 1869, from Bellevue College Hospital, New York city. 

Theodore B. WEITLING, born Oneida county; diploma February 23, 1873, from College of Physicians and Surgeons of New York city. 

Cassius O. JACKSON, born Canandaigua; diploma February 24, 1880, from University of Buffalo. 

Jedediah W. PALMER, born Berkshire county, Mass.; diploma September 1, 1830, from Berkshire Medical Institution, Pittsfield, Mass. 

Harvey JEWETT, born Cheshire county, NH; diploma December 31, 1831, from Medical Society of Herkimer county. 

Michael D. SKINNER, born Onondaga county; diploma May 2, 1865, from Illinois State Medical Society. 

James H. ALLEN, born Montgomery county; diploma January 23, 1853, from Albany Medical College. 

Frank W. MAILLER, born Atlanta, Ga.; diploma February 28, 1877, from Detroit Medical College. 

W. Scott HICKS, born Bristol; diploma February 26, 1851, from University of Buffalo. 

Dwight R. BURRELL, born Loraine county, O.; diploma March 25, 1868, from University of Michigan. 

Lewis E. GREEN, born Steuben county; diploma February 16, 1874, from Cincinnati College of Medicine and Surgery. 

Joseph Byron HAYES, born Canandaigua; diploma March 15, 1860, from University of Pennsylvania. 

Frederick D. VANDERHOOF, born Manchester; diploma March 10, 1864, from College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York city. 

Jonathan BURT, born Brattleboro', Vt.; license May 19, 1830, from Wayne County Medical Society. 

George W. PRENTISS, born Chelsea, Canada; diploma March 5, 1863, from Bellevue Hospital Medical College. 

Charles T. MITCHELL, born Hamilton, Ont.; diploma September 10, 1863, from University of Victoria College, Canada. 

Milton U. GERHARD, born Durham, Pa.; diploma March 15, 1877, from University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. 

Ellis B. SAYRE, born Rushville; license November 22, 1877, from Ontario County Medical Society. 

John HUTCHENS, born Cheshire; diploma February 20, 1871, from University of Buffalo. 

H. A. SLINGERLAND, born Canadice; diploma June 4, 1879, from Genesee Valley District Eclectic Medical Society. 

H. L. EDDY, born Wayne county; diploma December 11, 1833, from Berkshire Medical College, Massachusetts. 

George N. DOX, born Geneva; diploma February 15, 1843, from Albany Medical College. 

J. Henry BUDD, born Schuyler county; diploma February 23, 1875, from Buffalo Medical College. 

Byron B. HAVENS, born Yates county; diploma February 21, 1876, from Bellevue Hospital Medical College. 

Herbert M. EDDY, born Seneca county; diploma March 2, 1870, from College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York city. 

Matthew R. CARSON, born Seneca; diploma December 22, 1857, from Albany Medical College. 

Gardner S. GALLAGHER, born Cortland, NY; diploma March 20, 1872, from University of City of New York.

William A. WHEELER, born Wayne county; diploma March 10, 1880, from Hahnemann Homoeopathic Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Alexander D. ALLEN, born Gorham; diploma June 10, 1880, from Syracuse Medical College. 

Reuben E. PHILLIPS, born Canada; diploma January 18, 1872, from Eclectic Medical College of Pennsylvania. 

J. Benson VOAK, born Yates county; diploma March 1, 1866, from Homoeopathic Medical College of Pennsylvania. 

James K. KING, born Troy, NY; diploma March 1, 1877, from Columbia College, New York city. 

Albert G. CRUTTENDEN, born Wyoming county; diploma February 20, 1840, from Willoughby University of Lake Erie, Ohio. 

Matthew Bird GAULT, born Fayette county; diploma March 1, 1870, from Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Carmi C. THAYER, born Worcester county, Mass.; diploma February 26, 1876, from Rush Medical College, Chicago, Ills. 

Hilem F. BENNETT, born Cayuga county; diploma March 1, 1866, from Bellevue Hospital Medical College. 

Herbert F. GILLETTE, born Steuben county; license May 18, 1880, from Steuben County Homoeopathic Medical Society. 

William F. EDINGTON, born Seneca; diploma July 24, 1864, from Geneva Medical College. 

George E. FLOOD, born Seneca county; diploma March 4, 1879, from Detroit Medical College. 

Nellie L. KIETH, born Madison county; diploma March 15, 1871, from Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. 

Mary H. DUNBAR, born in Nebraska; diploma March 16, 1868, from Woman's Medical College of New York city. 

Henry FOSTER, born Norwich, Vt., diploma February 23, 1848, from Western Reserve College. 

William G. HEMIUP, born Geneva; diploma February 28, 1877, from Detroit Medical College. 

William M. SILVERNAIL, born Yates county; diploma June 4, 1879, from Genesee Valley District Medical Society. 

Jerome P. AVERY, born Fairfield, NY, diploma February 22, 1854, from University of Buffalo.

Archibald IMESON, born Canada; diploma June, 1856, from Victoria College. 

Stephen P. JOHNSON, born Oswego county; diploma December 27, 1859, from Albany Medical College. 

James H. STEBBINS, born Monroe county; diploma February 18, 1856, from American Medical College of Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Henry K. CLARKE, born Buffalo; diploma December, 1862, from Albany Medical College. 

Albert J. FRANTZ, born Seneca county; diploma June 28, 1871, from Detroit Medical College. 

Nelson B. COVERT, born Ovid, Seneca county; diploma February 27, 1862, from Homoeopathic Medical College of Cleveland, Ohio. 

Edwin O. HOLLISTER, born Batavia; diploma March 1, 1874, from Bellevue Hospital Medical College. 

Charles Hoyt MEAD, born Fairfield, Conn., diploma March 28, 1878, from Physio-Eclectic Medical College, Cincinnati, O. 

W. A. HARTMAN, born Sandusky, O.; diploma April 1, 1854, from Philadelphia College of Medicine. 

Watson W. ARCHER, born Hopewell; diploma January, 1867, from Geneva Medical College. 

James F. DRAPER, born Washington county; diploma January 27, 1846, from Geneva Medical College. 

Amos STODDARD, born Blenheim, O.; license June 25, 1868, from Eclectic Medical Society of State of New York. 

Elisaph DORCHESTER, born Geneva; diploma February 20, 1849, from Geneva Medical College. 

George Henry VAN DEUSEN, born Montgomery county; diploma June 9, 1861, from University of Vermont. 

George C. PRICHARD, born Phelps; license October 18, 1870, from Ontario County Medical Society. 

Sylvanus E. PARKER, born Niagara county; diploma February 20, 1877, from University of Buffalo. 

David H. CONLEY, born Yates county; diploma February 25, 1868, from Western Homoeopathic Medical College, Cleveland, O. 

Jeremiah P. H. DEMING, born Pittsfield, Mass.; diploma November 5, 1839, from Berkshire Medical College. 

Nehemiah S. BRYANT, born Seneca county; diploma January 25, 1845, from Geneva Medical College. 

Amos L. SWEET, born Cortland county; diploma March 9, 1866, from University Medical College, New York city. 

Henry D. WEYBURN, born Geneva; diploma March 22, 1876, from Physio-Eclectic Medical College of Ohio. 

Fred. Francis WEBSTER, born East Bloomfield; diploma February 23, 1875, from University of Buffalo. 

Mary E. STARK, born Yates county; diploma May 27, 1880, from Woman's Medical College of New York.  Infirmary. 

Amos Bird SMITH, born Tompkins county; diploma July 6, 1846, from Geneva Medical College. 

Byron D. HERSHEY, born Gorham; diploma March 31, 1869, from University of Michigan. 

William R. TOWNSEND, born Monroe county; diploma March 4, 1875, from Homoeopathic Medical College of New York. 

William H. COE, born Genesee county; diploma March 14, 1866, from University of Pennsylvania. 

John MELVIN, born Manchester; diploma March 5, 1850, from Eclectic Medical College, Cincinnati. 

Francis H. WISEWELL, born Yates county; diploma, March, 1871, from University of Michigan. 

James A. BARRINGER, born Rensselaer county; diploma February 24, 1873, from University of Buffalo. 

Elon G. CARPENTER, born Herkimer county; diploma June 6, 1840, from Castleton Medical College. 

John Dudley COOKE, born Canada; diploma February 22, 1881, from College of Physicians and Surgeons, Buffalo. 

Edward MUNSON, born Penn Yan; diploma May 13, 1881, from Medical Department Columbia College. 

J. Reed TOPPING, born Geneva; diploma June 23, 1881, from College of the University of City of New York. 

Charles M. FRANKLIN, born Lancaster, Pa.; diploma March 15, 1881, from University of Pennsylvania. 

William A. WHITE, born at Albany; diploma March 4, 1881, from Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. 

Wm. A. HUBBARD, born Tompkins county; diploma February 21, 1881, from University of Buffalo. 

E. Clayton SMITH, born Richmond; diploma June 7, 1881, from Eclectic Medical Institution, Cincinnati. 

Miles B. BUTLER, born Ontario county; diploma March 3, 1881, from New York Homoeopathic College. 

Frank P. WARNER, born Phelps; diploma March 9, 1881, from University of City of New York. 

Reuben E. PHILLIPS, born Canada; diploma March 2, 1881, from United States Medical College, New York city. 

Milo A. JEWETT, born in Asia; diploma June 29, 1881, from Harvard University. 

James Arthur PHILLIPS, born Clifton Springs; diploma March 7, 1882, from University of City of New York. 

John A. SHANNON, born Albany; diploma March 2, 1876, from Bennett Medical College, Chicago. 

Rachel T. SPEAKMAN, born Chester county, Pa.; diploma February 28, 1863, from Cleveland Homoeopathic College. 

Frank T. WILLSON, born Oswego county; diploma March 13, 1883, from University Medical College, New York city. 

George D. HAMLIN, born Naples; diploma March 15, 1883, from University Medical College, New York city. 

Benton S. PARTRIDGE, born Canadice; diploma March 6, 1883, from Pulte Medical College, Cincinnati, O. 

Frank H. IMGRAM, born Logansport, Ind.; diploma March 14, 1883, from Bellevue Hospital Medical College. 

Emory A. EAKIN, born Gallipolis, O.; diploma March 2, 1869, from Miami Medical College, Cincinnati, O. 

Frederick H. LUTZE, born Germany; diploma March 16, 1882, from Homoeopathic Medical College, New York city. 

Albert L. BEAHAN, born Watkins, NY; diploma March 1, 1879, from Bellevue Medical College, New York city. 

Murdock K. MACDONALD, born Nova Scotia; diploma March 6, 1884, from Chicago Homoeopathic Medical College. 

Elon N. CARPENTER, born New York; diploma March 11, 1884, from Medical Department University of City of New York. 

Duncan CAMPBELL, born Canada; diploma April 24, 1884, from College of Physicians and Surgeons, Ontario. 

James C. KNAPP, diploma March 13, 1884, from New York Homoeopathic Medical College. 

Franklin B. SMITH, born Hillsdale, Mich.; diploma February 26, 1879, from Hahnemann Medical College. 

Charles MUDGE, born Oswego county; diploma March 3, 1854, from College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York city. 

Joseph B. BURROUGHS, born Paterson, NJ; diploma June 4, 1881, from Syracuse University. 

George W. SARGENT, born Wallingford, Vt.; diploma June 25, 1879, from Syracuse University. 

Horace B. GEE, born Cortland, NY; diploma February 26, 1885, from University of Buffalo. 

Elmer D. COOLEY, born Oswego county; diploma July 2, 1882, from University of Vermont. 

John POPE DE LANEY, born Portsmouth, NH; diploma March 9, 1885, from Bellevue Hospital Medical College. 

L. M. PHILLIPS, born West Winfield, NY; diploma June 28, 1882, from University of Vermont. 

Robert W. WALMSLEY, born Dubuque, Ia.; diploma March 17, 1881, from University of Louisiana. 

Stoughton R. WHEELER, born North Bergen, NJ; diploma February 23, 1886, from University of Buffalo. 

Cuvier R. MARSHALL, born Bellefontaine, O.; diploma March 9, 1885, from Bellevue Hospital Medical College. 

James Henry HASLETT, born Seneca; diploma March 6, 1886, from University Medical College, New York city. 

John J. McNULTY, born Seneca county; diploma February, 1877, from College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York city. 

John A. ROBSON, born Seneca; diploma March 3, 1886, from Albany Medical College. 

George M. SKINNER, born Richmond; diploma March 15, 1886, from College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore. 

George A. LUNG, born Canandaigua; diploma May 1, 1886, from University of Pennsylvania. 

George H. KING, born Mechlenburg, NY; diploma May 28, 1868, from Eclectic Medical College, Cincinnati. 

Lucius C. ADAMSON, born Atlanta, Ga.; diploma March 11, 1885, from University of New York City. 

George W. McCLELLAN, born Alton, Ontario; diploma February 24, 1885, from University of Buffalo. 

William S. ROGERS, born Central Square, NY, diploma March 1, 1883, from Eclectic Medical College, New York city. 

Caroline A. HEMIUP, born Geneva; diploma March 17, 1881, from Woman's Medical College, Philadelphia. 

Kate A. HATHAWAY, born Hornellsville, NY; diploma June 30, 1887, from University of Michigan. 

Charles A. FOSTER, born England; diploma February 22, 1847, from Botanica Medical College of Ohio. 

Chauncey A. HOLT, born Hartford, Conn.; diploma February 17, 1877, from University of City of New York. 

Henry H. COBURN, born Waterbury, Vt., diploma February 19, 1889, from Chicago Homoeopathic College. 

Isidore A. McCLELLAN, born New York city; diploma May 5, 1880, from Eclectic Medical College, Cincinnati, O. 

Frank Bert RASBACH, born Ilion, NY; diploma March 30, 1891, from Bellevue Hospital Medical College.

 

1893 Ontario Asylums   pg 235 - 238

Ontario Orphan Asylum.--This charitable and most praiseworthy institution had its inception in the efforts of a few of the generous and benevolent persons of Canandaigua, and although not an organization of the county town, may be appropriately mentioned in this chapter.  The articles of incorporation were executed in July, 1863, and soon afterward the organization was perfected, and by it provision was made (according to the constitution) for the election of seven trustees, and a board of managers, 24 in number, the latter to be elected from the female members of the corporation. 

Upon the completion of the organization, the trustees purchased the Greenleaf homestead property, containing five acres of land, to which 13 acres more were subsequently added.  The building was remodeled and furnished for its proposed use, and the asylum was soon ready for the reception of orphan children of the county and vicinity.  We may mention here, also, that this institution has been quite liberally endowed by generous admirers of its worth and purpose, and now possesses property and securities to the value of $43,460.19, and in addition derives an annual income of $3,000 from a contingent endowment fund of $75,000.  The last mentioned sum of money will come to the trustees absolutely upon the death of certain legatees, but at this time the asylum receives an annual income equal to the amount stated. 

The financial and more difficult affairs of the institution are vested in the trustees, who are the legal representatives of the corporation, for the purpose of receiving and holding the property belonging to it, while the conduct of all other affairs of the asylum is entrusted to the managers.  The present trustees are as follows: James C. SMITH, president; Charles A. RICHARDSON, secretary; F. H. HAMLIN, treasurer; and Henry M. FIELD, F. F. THOMPSON, David G. LAPHAM, and Max C. BEARD. 

The Board of Managers is as follows: Canandaigua-- Mrs. A. McKECHNIE, Mrs. F. F. THOMPSON, Mrs. H. T. PARMELE, Miss Alice SMITH, Mrs. Geo. N. WILLIAMS, Mrs. Charles C. WILCOX, Mrs. H. M. FIELD, Mrs. R. L. BEECHER, Mrs. H. M. FINLEY, Mrs. William GORHAM, Mrs. L. E. CLARKE, Mrs. Wm. H. ADAMS, Mrs. A. M. STOWE, Mrs. D. ALVERSON, Mrs. L. T. SUTHERLAND, Miss Priscilla HANNA, Mrs. A. L. FREEMAN, Mrs. A. SCOFIELD, Mrs. F. H. HAMLIN, Miss Ida CANFIELD, Mrs. Wm. Allen Reed. 

Geneva-- Mrs. J. W. SMITH, Mrs. D. B. BACKENSTOSE, Mrs. N. B. COVERT, Mrs. T. J. SKILTON, Mrs. John DE LANCEY, Mrs. T. C. MAXWELL, Mrs. D. P. NELSON, Miss Nancy JOHNSTON, Miss Grace SUTHERLAND, Miss Julia SILL. 

Victor--Mrs. O. S. BACON, Mrs. C. O. JACKSON, Mrs. Will OSBORNE, Mrs. HIGINBOTHAM. 

East Bloomfield--Mrs. H. E. PORTER, Mrs. Helen BEEBE, Mrs. E. O. HOLLISTER, Miss Edna BEACH, Mrs. W. REED, Mrs. Oliver SWIFT.

West Bloomfield--Mrs. S. H. AINSWORTH, Mrs. Myron SHEPARD, Mrs. Will CASE, Miss Harriet HALL, Miss Rebecca ORCUTT. 

Clifton Springs--Mrs. Dr. ARCHER, Mrs. C. C. WHITNEY, Mrs. A. A. RAYMOND, Mrs. H. KELLOGG. 

Richmond--Mrs. Dr. WILBUR, Mrs. Jackson BRAY. 

Bristol--Mrs. Dr. HICKS, Mrs. TEMPLAR, Mrs. Gooding PACKARD. 

Richmond Mills--Mrs. Charles REED. 

Gorham--Mrs. John CODY. 

South Bloomfield--Mrs. SIMMONS, Mrs. Frank POOLE. 

Canadice--Mrs. Asher NORTON. 

Naples--Mrs. Geo. GORDON, Mrs. E. C. CLARK. 

Shortsville--Mrs. O. S. TITUS. 

Manchester--Mrs. Sarah McCOMB, Mrs. Edwin PRATT. 

Miller Corners--Mrs. Erastus MILLER. 

The officers of the Board are as follows: President, Mrs. Charles S. HOYT; directresses, Mrs. A. M. STOWE, Mrs. D. ALVERSON, Mrs. F. H. HAMLIN, Miss Alice SMITH; treasurer, Mrs. Henry M. FIELD; recording secretary, Mrs. Hiram T. PARMELE; corresponding secretary, Mrs. William GORHAM. 

Brigham Hall.--This institution was founded in 1855, and was named in honor of the memory of Dr. Amaria BRIGHAM, the first superintendent of the State Asylum at Utica.  Just on the edge of the village stands this hall which for many years has been a retreat for patients whose friends desire more privacy than is possible in a State institution.  Beautiful grounds surround the retreat and there is a farm of 100 acres in connection.  It was established, as has been stated, in 1855, by Dr. George COOK and was chartered by special act of the Legislature in 1859, and afterwards licensed when the law so required.  It was the first institution for the insane in the State to take the name of "hospital," as well as the first where was made a legal requirement for admission to have the certificate of two physicians.  That personal liberty of patients which is now permitted in most all insane hospitals was from the first granted by Dr. COOK.  There are four classifications on the male and the same number on the female side. 

In the management of the institution Dr. COOK procured the services of Dr. John B. CHAPIN, who remained until 1869, then resigning to enter upon the duties of superintendent of Willard Asylum at Ovid.  In 1876, upon the death of Dr. COOK, Dr. D. R. BURRELL was appointed resident physician, and is assisted by Dr. C. A. VAN DER BECK, associate physician. 

 

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