Ontario, New York
History and Genealogy

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GAGE   

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 241 - 243

GAGE, Amasa, Gorham, was born in Wellstown in 1770, and in 1799 married Barbara Ann OVERACKER (born in 1782) of the same place, and moved to Johnstown, where he cleared a farm, upon which he resided until 1806, when he emigrated west and located is what is now the town of Gorham.  His family consisted of himself, wife and three children: Cornelia, Elizabeth and Marvin.  He purchased a farm of Phelps & Gorham, where he lived until his death in 1842.  After removing to Gorham 10 children were added to this family as follows: Michael, Nancy, Lorain, Datus E., Amasa, Catharine, Lorenzo D., Orrin D., Hester Ann, and Ira B.  Datus E. and Catharine died at one and two years respectively; the others reached maturity.  Amasa, Sr., died at the age of 68 and Barbara in 1846.  When Amasa settled in Gorham it was a wilderness from Canandaigua to his place, a distance of seven miles; there were but two houses on the trail.  

Marvin GAGE at the age of 23, married Hester WAGER, and purchased 80 acres of land of Phelps & Gorham on the lake shore, adjoining his father's, on which he built a log house and where he lived until 1836, when he purchased another farm of Hezekiah TOWNSEND, a little north of where he then resided, owned by one COLE at the time Amasa located his farm.  Marvin resided upon this farm until 1843, then purchased of the heirs the old homestead, upon which he lived until the time of his death in 1872, having sold the homestead to the youngest son, Frankin B. GAGE.  Marvin and Hester raised a family of 6 children: Amasa, Byron, Anna B., Orrin D., Frank B., and Ida A., all of whom are living except Franklin B.   Marvin, during his life held the office of commissioner two terms, was twice elected assessor, was justice of the peace 21 years, and was twice elected supervisor.  

Cornelia, the eldest daughter, married John OVERACKER, lived in Yates county until about 1840, and then moved to Kalamazoo, Mich.  

Nancy GAGE married John GARRISON, lived near the old homestead until about 1840, raised a large family, and then moved to Kalamazoo, Mich.   Both of these daughters died at the age of 68 years.  

Michael, second son of Amasa Sr., married a Miss WRIGHT for his first wife, and was a farmer in Yates county.  He married his second wife about 1856, who bore him one son (deceased); she died and he married his third wife, who bore him two children.  He died at the age of 76 years.   But three of his 11 children by his first wife survive him.

Amasa 2d, third son of Amasa Sr., married Harriet WHEELER of Cattaraugus county; was a school teacher when a young man, and then engaged in farming; he died at the age of 46, leaving no children of his own, but had raised an adopted son.  

Lorain GAGE married C. VANNESS of Monroe county, was a farmer in Gorham, and died at the age of 68; he left one son.  Nancy GAGE married John SAUNDERS, who was a farmer in Yates county, and had two sons and four daughters; he died at the age of 69.  

Lorenzo D. GAGE married Orphian WAGER and raised three children: Marvin, Elizabeth, and Amasa.  He has been an extensive farmer, owning at one time 1,000 acres of land; has held the office of assessor and supervisor several terms.  He purchased of Frank B. GAGE the old homestead and sold it to his oldest son, Marvin, who has been assessor and supervisor.  Elizabeth married Frank G. GAGE, and is engaged in agriculture.  Lorenzo D. lives retired from business with his youngest son, Amasa, being now 76 years of age.  Amasa is farming about 500 acres.  

Hester Ann GAGE married Myron F. WASHBURN, a farmer, and had one son, Ira G. WASHBURN.  His mother is now living, aged 73.  

Orrin D. GAGE died at the age of 20, while engaged in school teaching.

Ira B. GAGE married Abigail FISHER, moved to St. Joseph county, Mich., in 1845, and engaged in farming and shipping stock to the eastern markets; he was also a heavy dealer in peppermint oil; he died at the age of 46, without issue.  

Amasa, the eldest son of Marvin and Hester GAGE, has been engaged in farming and in breeding fine wool sheep, shipping largely to the Western States; at present he is engaged in raising fruit.  He was elected commissioner in 1853.  He married Elizabeth F. WASHBURN in 1848, and had five children, three of whom are living: Richard M., Mary A., and Charles A.  Richard M. married Mary E. GAGE.  Mary A. married Calvin HALL.  Charles A. married Mary MORLEY; all of whom are engaged in growing fruit and farming.  Byron, second son of Marvin, married in 1855 Alida WASHBURN; he has been engaged in farming, shipping stock, teaching school, and has held the office of assessor two terms.  Anna B. married R. M. WASHBURN, a farmer, in 1856; they have had two children: Emma and Frank B. (deceased).  Orrin D., son of Marvin, married in 1863 Harriet WILLSON; two sons and four daughters have been born to them: Adelbert, Marvin, Alida, Belle, Clara, and Elizabeth.  The sons are both married and engaged in farming.  Frank B. GAGE, son of Marvin, married Jennie ROE in 1869, who died in 1873.  He bought the homestead of his father, sold it to L. D. GAGE and went into mercantile business.  He married his second wife and died at the age of 30, leaving one son.  Ida, youngest daughter of Marvin and Hester GAGE, married Irving TAKE in 1869, and they have three sons and four daughters, all engaged in agriculture and fruit culture.

 

GALUSHA   

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 300 - 301

GALUSHA, George S., Phelps, was born in Yates county, July 14, 1857, one of four children of Clark and Eunice (BURNETT) GALUSHA.  The father, Clark GALUSHA, was born in Otsego county, his wife being a native of Phelps.  Simeon, the grandfather, was a native of Otsego county.  George S. married, September 26, 1877, Mary Isabel THATCHER, one of four children of Jesse and Cyntha (ESTEY) THATCHER, of Hopewell.  Mr. GALUSHA has lived in the town of Phelps since he was four years of age.  His farm is used for the production of the variety of crops common to this section.

 

 GALUSHA

History of Ontario Co, NY and Its People, Pub 1911, Vol II, pg. 202 - 203 

The name GALUSHA is an uncommon one owing to the meagre number of its bearers, and practically no information has been gathered concerning the origin.  The family to which this article relates is of French descent, and its American forbears were among the early settlers in Vermont.  The name was made prominent in the history of the "Green Mountain State" by Jonas GALUSHA, who, in addition to serving as a soldier in the Revolutionary War, was its governor from 1809 to 1813, and again from 1815 to 1820.

     ( I ) Seymour GALUSHA, a native of France, settled in Vermont prior to the American Revolution.  But little information can be found relative to him or his family history, but he is known to have had a son Amos, who settled in Otsego county, New York.

     ( II ) Clark, son of Amos GALUSHA, was born in Otsego county, October 11, 1824.  Reared in a sparsely settled community his education was confined to the limited advantages afforded by the public school system then in vogue in the rural districts, but he made good use of his opportunities for study and became a man of considerable learning.  His principal occupation was tilling the soil.  In early manhood he resided for a time in Italy, Yates county, New York, and settling in Phelps, Ontario county, in 1864 he purchased a farm which he carried on successfully for the remainder of his active life.  In 1864 he enlisted in the 50th New York Engineers Corps for service in the Union Army, and served until the close of the Civil War, receiving an honorable discharge in 1865.  Although the management of his farm absorbed the greater part of his attention, he nevertheless found opportunities to exercise his abilities in other fields of usefulness, and was one of the most prominent citizens of Phelps in his day.  He took a special interest in the study of history and was regarded as an authority upon that subject.  In politics he was a republican. 

He was a member and trustee of the Methodist Episcopal church, for a number of years acting as superintendent of the Sunday School.  Mr. GALUSHA died May 28, 1906.  He married Eunice BURNETTE, who died October 23, 1896.  Children:  Evangeline, married T.V. FOX, of Clifton Springs, New York; Amanda, married C. SHULTZ, of Clifton Springs; Herbert, died at the age of two years; George S., whose sketch follows:

     ( III ) George S., son of Clark and Eunice ( BURNETTE ) GALUSHA, was born in Italy, Yates county, New York, July 14, 1857.  He went to reside in Phelps in the autumn of 1864, and completed his education at the union school in that town.  He acquired a good knowledge of farming at the homestead and with the exception of short intervals devoted to other pursuits, has made that calling his chief occupation in life.  About the year 1884 he went to Kansas, where he engaged in sheep-raising, and having accumulated a flock of 1,700 sheep he sold them to good advantage and returned to the homestead.  From 1893 to 1898 he was engaged in the shoe trade in Naples, New York, and selling his business in the latter year, he has ever since devoted his energies to the cultivation of his farm in Phelps.  He was elected road commissioner in 1905, was reelected in 1907, and at the present time is serving as town committeeman.  He is a charter member of Naples Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, organized in 1894, and also affiliates with Wide-Awake Grange, Patrons of Husbandry.  He has in various ways demonstrated his business ability and progressive tendencies, and is ever ready to aid in promoting the general interests of the town.  Mr. GALUSHA married, September 26, 1877, Mary Isabelle, daughter of Jesse and Cynthia A. THATCHER.  They have one daughter, Georgia Gladys, born July 3, 1901.

 

GAMBEE

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg. 224  [also duplicated on pg 301]  

GAMBEE, William H., Geneva, was born in Varick, Seneca county, February 4, 1833.  He was educated in the public schools and graduated from Lima Seminary.  He has always been a produce dealer and farmer.  January 4, 1860, he married S. Elizabeth BOYD, who was born on the place on which they reside, north of Geneva, her father's homestead.  They have one daughter, Nellie E., who was married on February 5, 1893, to Edward HOOPER of Newark, Wayne county.  Mr. GAMBEE's father, William, was born in Pennsylvania about 1792, and married Agnes ARMSTRONG.  They had six children: John Y., Mary E., Isaac T., William H., Annie and Lavina.  Mrs. GAMBEE's father, David BOYD, was born in Pennsylvania in 1796, and married Ann RINGER, by whom he had eight children: John, Isabella, Robert, Sarah E., Elvira, Charles, Elizabeth, and David.  David BOYD served in the War of 1812, and Mr. GAMBEE's father, William, was also in that war.  Mr. GAMBEE was a sutler in the Army of the Potomac in the Civil War.

 

 

GARDNER 

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, Pub 1893, pg. 73

 

GARDNER, Elisha W., Canandaigua, was born in Farmington, November 26, 1826, a son of Elisha W. GARDNER, a farmer of that town, born in Rhode Island and resided for a few years in Albany county, NY, where he married Sarah, daughter of General PATTERSON, of Revolutionary fame, and came to Ontario county in 1810 and settled in Farmington.  They had 12 children, three of them now living: Rev. Sunderland P. GARDNER, of Farmington, Mrs. Miriam SHELDON of Barry, Orleans county, and Elisha W., our subject.  The early life of our subject was spent on the homestead farm.  He was educated at Macedon Academy, and taught in district schools and Macedon Academy, preparing for college at Lima Seminary.  On the formation of Genesee College he spent one year there.  He practiced civil engineering for a few years and then entered the New York State and National Law University at Ballston Springs, graduating with the degree of LL. B. in the fall of 1851.  Chancellor WALWORTH was president of the University at that time.  He was admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court that same fall, and immediately opened an office in Canandaigua and has continued in practice here ever since.  In 1854 he was admitted to the United States District and Circuit Courts, in which his practice has been quite extensive, and has argued a large number of causes at the General Term and in the New York Court of Appeals, and he has been a very successful lawyer.  Mr. GARDNER has been an active partisan of the republican party since its formation in 1856, but has never been an aspirant to political office.  In 1856 to 1860 he made many speeches throughout the State in the interests of the new party.  Mr. GARDNER married in 1852 Sarah A., daughter of William POUND, of Farmington.  Mrs. POUND was a sister of Rev. Dr. GOODELL, well known as the Turkish missionary.  Mr. GARDNER has three children: Mary J., Helen A., and Edwin P., of Ontario County Journal.

 

 

GARDNER

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 78 - 79

 

GARDNER, Sunderland P., was born in Rensselaer, Albany county, NY, July 4, 1802, and was the oldest of twelve children, two of whom, Mrs. Marium SHELDON of Barre, Orleans county, and E. W. GARNDER, esq., of Canandaigua, survive him.  His father, Elisha W. GARDNER, was born in Rhode Island May 8, 1779, and on April 19, 1801; married Sarah PATTERSON, daughter of Sutherland PATTERSON, a soldier in WASHINGTON's Army, and one of those who accompanied the latter on his expedition to Trenton on Christmas Eve, 1776.  The GARDNERS were of English ancestry who settled in Rhode Island and Nantucket prior to 1620.  The subject of this sketch came in 1814 with his parents to Farmington where he resided until his death, February 13, 1893.  Having no opportunity of schooling save those common to a new country, but being a lover of learning and possessed of a superior mind he became a self-educated scholar.  As a young man he taught, and was at one time commissioner of schools; but at about the age of 30 he was called to the ministry and eventually became a leader in the society of Friends of which he was a birth-right member.  He was for 60 years a faithful standard-bearer in the church, for which he traveled extensively in the United States and Canada, and had, besides other gospel work, been called to attend more than two thousand funerals, many of them hundreds of miles from home and among various classes of people.  He loved to study and teach the beautiful lessons in the Bible, of which he was a diligent student, and was able "to give a reason for the faith that was in him."  Being of a peace loving disposition he desired not controversy for its own sake, yet when attacked on doctrinal points by those who failed to understand the real principles of Quakerism he was ready and able to explain, and if need be, to defend what he preached.  The sermons of Mr. GARDNER during his long ministry were delivered extempore, but many were taken down by stenographers and a few have been published; he also made contributions to science which were received with favor by scholars, and have entered into standard works.  He labored for the gospel without pecuniary reward, believing with the old-time Quakers the words of Christ, "Freely ye have received, freely give," until a few years before his death, when certain members of the society of Friends were impressed with the conviction that his burdens were too heavy to be borne alone, and nobly returned a part of the large amount he had so willingly expended in the cause of truth.  Thus was fulfilled the promise, Ps. 41:1-3.  Mr. GARDNER was married three times; first to Mary WILLETS who survived but a few years, leaving with him a daughter, who married Nath. POWELL of Mendon; his second wife was Lament, youngest daughter of William and Eunice GATCHEL of this town; his third wife was Annette H., daughter of William and Sarah (LORD) BELL of Crawford county, Penn.  They had three sons, Sunderland P., Oscar B., and Anson L., all now living on the home farm.  We make the following extracts from the Ont. County Journal, published February 17, 1893:  "It is not easy to find words to express an adequate measure of the good and the great in the life that has ceased to throw its direct influence upon the world.  The life itself is that life's best eulogy.  Loved by his intimates for his kind and genial personal traits, admired by casual acquaintances for his rugged simplicity, reverenced by his parishioners for his nobility and charity of mind, esteemed by the community for the lessons of peace which his life embodied, his epitaph will find most thoughtful expression engraved upon the hearts of all who ever came within the human circle of his personality."  Also from the same paper we take the following statement:  "In early life Mr. GARDNER became a member of the Masonic order.  In 1826 his religious objection to warfare compelling him to protest against rendering any military support, he was arrested and incarcerated in the county jail for failure to pay what was called the "training fine."  During his confinement there those charged with the abduction of MORGAN, the noted exposer of Masonic secrets, were brought to the jail and also imprisoned.  Among them were the late Nathaniel W. CHESEBRO and Sheriff BRUCE of Niagara county.  From these men, thus imprisoned, Mr. GARDNER, by virtue of his affiliation, learned the entire details of the affair, details which to-day are probably known but by one person."

 

GARDNER
History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 80   

GARDNER, Edwin J., Farmington, was born in Farmington January 22, 1853.  He was educated in the public schools and follows farming.  He is a justice of the peace in the town of Farmington, also does some photographic work for his friends.  March 30, 1880, he married Roseline R., daughter of John J. and Lydia B. DOTY of this town.  Mrs. GARDNER was born in Farmington September 15, 1860, and they have two children, Mary R., and Lindley J.   Mr. GARDNER's father, John W., was born in the town of Rensselaerville, Albany county, was one of a family of twelve children, was a brother of Sunderlin P. GARDNER and his father was Elisha W.  John  was born November 13, 1814, and married Anna B. COLTON of Farmington.  They had eight children:  George W., Sarah P., Anna E., Leonard W., Charlotte S., Marium A., Edwin J., and Charles H.  John W. GARDNER died February 23, 1875.  Mrs. GARDNER's father, John J. DOTY, was born in Washington county July 15, 1812, and came here with his parents when he was a boy.  He married twice, first in 1834 to Amy LANE, and had one son, John S.  For his second wife he married, August 27, 1836, Lydia B. WILSON of Morris county, NJ, and had five children:  Mary W., Susan J., Charles E., John M., Roseline R.  Mr. John J. DOTY died September 23, 1878.

 

GARDNER

 History of Ontario Co. & Its People,  Vol. II,  Pub 1911.  pg 293 - 296

Anson Lapham GARDNER, whose paternal ancestors were among the early colonial settlers of this country, is rapidly attaining distinction in the profession of law, which he has chosen for his work. 

(I)                         William GARDNER, the immigrant ancestor of this family, came from England at an early date, and settled in Rhode Island, where he located at McSparren Hill and died there in 1748.

(II)                     John, was a son of William GARDNER.

(III)                William (2), son of John GARDNER, settled in Albany county, New York, 1790.

(IV)                    Elisha W., son of William (2) GARDNER, was born at South Kingston, Rhode Island, and followed the occupation of farming.  He married Sarah, born in Amenia, Dutchess county, New York, daughter of Thomas PATTISON, who came from the north of Ireland and settled in the colony of Connecticut, and a granddaughter of William UTTER, who was the German descent, and whose family was almost entirely wiped out by the Indians during the French and Indian War.  In the �Memoirs of Sunderland Pattison GARDNER�, we read: �His wife, eight children, one white man, and one colored servant were scalped, and left for dead on the floor, the father and the son being absent, returned the next morning to behold the terrible sight, and to learn that the two young girls, seven and nine years old, had been carried away prisoners.  Overwhelmed with grief, they buried their friends with their own hands.  The two girls, Hannah and Sarah (the latter the great-grandmother of Anson Lapham  GARDNER), were held in cruel captivity eleven month, and then returned by an exchange of prisoners.�  Sarah (Pattison) GARDNER was a first cousin of Elizabeth PATTISON (commonly spelled PATTERSON), who married Jerome, a brother of Napoleon Boneparte.  Children of Elisha W. and Sarah (Pattison) GARDNER: A child, died in infancy; Sunderland Pattison, see forward; Hannah; Sarah: Harriet: John W., Mary; Maryam; Elizabeth, Amy Ann; Elisha W., Jr.; Thomas P.

(V)                         Sunderland Pattison, son of Elisha W. and Sarah (Pattison) GARDNER, was born in Resselaerville, New York, July 4, 1802, and died February 13, 1893.  He was a farmer, but the chief work of his life was as minister in the Society of Friends.   He was a temperance advocate and a staunch Democrat, and as a young man served for several years as a school commissioner.  He was married according to the Friends� ceremony, May 28, 1863, to Annette Hannah BELL, who was born at Richmond, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, August 24, 1836.  She was the daughter of William and Sarah Hyde (LORD) BELL, the former born in Pennsylvania, 1765; granddaughter of John BELL, who was born in Pennsylvania, of Scotch-Irish descent, and served as a soldier in the Revolutionary War under Washington.  Sarah Hyde (LORD) BELL was born in Connecticut, 1800, and was a daughter of Gould LORD, granddaughter of Samuel LORD, and great-granddaughter of Robert LORD, a native of England, who was the first soldier to scale the wall at Quebec during the French and Indian war.  Annette Hannah (BELL) GARDNER was the great-granddaughter, on the maternal side, of Ephraim FANTON, who was of Irish descent, and who came to this country in the �Mayflower� and she still has in her possession a trunk brought over by him.  The FANTONS intermarried with the BEERS, who were of Welsh descent, and the LORDS and HYDES intermarried, both of the latter families being of English descent.  Aaron BURR was a third cousin on the maternal side.  Children of Sunderland Pattison and Annette Hannah (BELL) GARDNER: Sunderland Pattison, born Dec 23, 1868; Oscar Bell, born June 17, 1871; Anson Lapham, see forward.

(VI)                    Anson Lapham, son of Sunderland Pattison and Annette Hannah (BELL) GARDNER, was born in Farmington, Ontario County, New York, February 7, 1873.  His preparatory education was acquired in the district school of Farmington and the Macedon Center Academy, and he then became a student at Columbia University, New York City, from which he was graduated in the class of 1896.  During his earlier years he assisted in the cultivation of the home farm and was engaged in the teaching in district schools for a period of two years.  He commenced the study of law in the office of his uncle, Elisha W. GARDNER, continuing at the university, and was admitted to the bar in November 1897.  He is engaged in general practice and his list of clients, attracted by his skilful conduct of the cases entrusted to him, is a large and constantly increasing one.  His political affiliations are with the Democratic party, and he very efficiently filled the position of clerk in the supervisor�s office in 1894-95.  His fraternal affiliations are as follows: Canandaigua Grange, N. 1062, of which he as been secretary; Canandaigua Lodge, No. 294, Free and Accepted Masons; Canandaigua Lodge, No., 236, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which he as served as chaplin; Canandaigua Camp, No. 9574, Modern Woodmen of America, of Canandaigua; U.O.A.M., Mc Kinley Council, No. 95; president of the brotherhood of the First Methodist Episcopal Church of Canandaigua; director of the Young Men�s Christian Association of Canandaigua.  Mr. GARDNER is a member of the Society of Friends, and his wife is a member of the Reformed Evangelical church.

Mr. GARDNER married at Farmington, August 29, 1901, Edith M. CLAPPER, born in Canandaigua.  She is the daughter of Abraham and Elizabeth (APPLETON) CLAPPER, the former a farmer who was born at Geneseo, New York, November 4, 1834, and is of Dutch descent, the latter was born at Worsted, England, November 20, 1835, and came to America with her parents in 1850.  Abraham and Elizabeth (APPLETON) CLAPPER had children: Richard, of Canandaigua; Abraham Lincoln, of Canandaigua; Dr. William Bennett, of Victor; Arthur Henry, of Starkey, Yates county; Mary Elizabeth, of Palmyra; and Edith May, of Canandaigua.  Anson Lapham and Edith M. (CLAPPER) GARDNER have children: Sunderland Pattison, born June 14, 1902; and Elizabeth Annette, born January 19, 1906.

 

 

GARDNER

History of  Ontario Co. & Its People, Vol. II, pg 430 - 431 

Jacob Janse GARDINIER, also FLOODER, was the progenitor of the GARDINER and GARDNER families, or the greater part of them, in 1790.  In 1790 the heads of families of these surnames, include in Columbia county, Dirck,  Peter A., Peter H., Peter J., Samuel H., Andrew, Gideon, Godfrey, James, Labon and John.  Jacob J. was a Bebverwyck as early as 1638 and came from Holland.  In 1656 he owned land on the north side of Wall street from William to Pearl street, New Amsterdam, and he divided this track into house lots and sold them through his agent, Sander Leendertse GLEN.  He bought land early in Kinderhook together with Goyer�s Kill opposite or near Apje�s Island and his immediate descendants settled very generally in this section.  Three families of descendants were in Kinderhook in 1790, Dirck, Peter A., and Godfrey, being the fathers.  Jacob J., married (first) Jospyna _______ , who died February 16, 1664; (second) Barenthe STRATSMANS, widow of Ham COENRAATSE.  In 1688 she was again a widow, having then living, 10 children by her first husband and 5 by the second.  Children of Jacob J. GARDINIER: Jan; Samuel; Andres; Hendrick; Albert; Aeltje, married Adam DINGMAN.

(I)                      Benjamin GARDNER was a farmer in Columbia county and is believed to have been of this family.

(II)                  Hanson A., son of Benjamin GARDNER, was born in Columbia county, New York.  He came to the town of Phelps, Ontario county, in 1864, and bought a farm, which he conducted until 1875, when he removed to Newark, New York.  Earlier in life, he resided at Nassau, Rensselaer county, New York.  At Newark he was a prominent and influential citizen.  For a number of years he was president of the incorporated village and he held other office of trust and responsibility.  He married, Aug 22, 1861, Mary FERGUSON, who died Mar 23, 1898, daughter of Palmer FERGUSON.  Children: Charles H., mentioned below; Frederick, born August 22, 1865, died Sept 10, 1910.

(III)             Charles H., son of Hanson A. GARDNER, was born in the town of Nassau, Rensselaer county, New York, July 12, 1863, and was educated in the public schools of Phelps and Newark, graduating from the Newark high school.  Since leaving school he has been engaged in farming in Phelps and he is among the most representative and progressive citizens of the town.  He is a member of Newark Grange, Patrons of Husbandry.  In politics, he is Republican.  His family attended the Universalist church. 

Mr. GARDNER married, December 23, 1885, Nettie E. PERCEY, born June 2, 1865, in Arcadia, Wayne county, New York, daughter of Henry and Amanda Louise (HARMON) PERCEY, of Arcadia, New York.  Children: Percy, born January 4, 1895; Edith, December 29, 1899.  Mrs. GARDNER, is a great-granddaughter of David HARMON, who lived in the town of Phelps.  Simeon, son of David HARMON, and grandfather of Mrs. GARDNER, lived in Phelps, married Sophia CROTHERS and had children: Almira, married Melzer BURGESS; Amanda Louise, married May 5, 1863 to Henry PERCEY, and they were the parents of Mrs. GARDNER; Simeon, killed in the civil war; William, married Alice SNYER and were the parents of seven children: Ella, Albert, Ada, Simeon, Percy, Hugh, Alice.  

 

GARLOCK   

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 234 - 235

GARLOCK, Peter, Phelps, was born in Phelps, October 6, 1832.  He was one of 9 children of Abram and Catharine (COOK) GARLOCK, of Montgomery county.  The grandfather was Peter, and his father emigrated to this country from Holland at an early day.  Peter COOK, the grandfather on the mother's side, was a native of New Jersey.  Peter GARLOCK married in 1857 Maria VAN DEVORT, of Phelps, who died in 1886 leaving 7 children: Ellen (Mrs. O. M. LINCOLN), Abram, Thomas, Charles, Kate, Alfred, and Jessie M.  He subsequently married Cecilia SMITH, of Rochester, and they have two children: Arthur, and Grace.  Mr. GARLOCK spent 27 years in Arcadia, the rest of his life in Phelps.  In 1863 Peter GARLOCK began distilling cider-brandy and peppermint, and has continued in that business.  In 1879 he started the mill in Phelps where he is now located, adding improved machinery in 1885.  In 1889 his son, Charles GARLOCK, went into the business with his father, under the firm name of P. Garlock & Son.  Their plant has a capacity of from 2,500 to 3,000 barrels per year.

 

GARLOCK 

History of Ontario Co, NY and Its People, Pub. 1911, Vol. II, pg. 32 -33

 

Peter GARLOCK, the first member of this family of whom we have definite information, was a descendant of Johann Christopher GERLACH, one of the immigrants from the Palatinate on the Rhine, in Germany.  He was born not later than 1690.  He was appointed the head man of the "dorfs" or villages in which a number of these immigrants were settled in 1710 and 1711.  There were seven of these dorfs, on both sides of the Hudson river, in and opposite what is now Columbia county.  Elizabethtown, over which Johann Christopher GERLACH was head man, was west o the river.  In 1713 a body of these Palatines removed to Schoharie.  They were in a miserable condition, having been unfairly treated in their former settlement, but happily were kindly received and charitably assisted by the Indians.  The richness of the soil soon enabled them to improve their condition.  Others followed within a few years, and one of the villages formed by them was named Gerlach's or Garlock's dorf, after Elias GARLOCK.  About 1722 Elias GARLOCK removed to the Mohawk valley.  Several of the GARLOCKS have won distinction in the Revolution and in Medicine.  Peter GARLOCK had at least one child, Abram, referred to below.

(II)  Abram, son of Peter GARLOCK, was a farmer in Manchester, New York.  He married Catharine, daughter of Peter COOK, who was a native of New Jersey.  The children of Abram and Catharine (Cook) GARLOCK were nine, including Cyrus, referred to below; Dr. Alfred, who lived in Michigan; and Peter, born in Phelps, October 6, 1832, mentioned below.  

(III) Cyrus, son of Abram GARLOCK was born in Manchester, August 26, 1826, died July 6, 1908.  After his education he ran a lumber and stave factory and a cooper shop, and in later years engaged in farming.  He was supervisor of the town and justice of the peace.  He married (first) Hester Ann FERGUSON, and (second) Laura BURT, who died in 1892.  Children of Cyrus and Laura (Burt) GARLOCK: Erastus Burt, married Mary CRAMER, and they lived in St. Louise, Missouri; children: Howard Burt, Laura Marguerite, Floyd, Ruth; William F., referred to below and Mary C.

(IV) William F., son of Cyrus and Laura (Burt) GARLOCK, was born in the town of Manchester, February 15, 1870.  He was educated in the public schools, then engaged in farming until 1904.  In that year he went to Port Gibson, where he engaged in the creamery business and runs a general store.  July 1, 1910, he was appointed postmaster.  In 1891, he married Nellie, daughter of Carroll C. and Lydia TERRY.  Children: Laura Fern, born in 1892; Alice, 1894; Terry, 1895; Emma, 1898; Vincent, 1901; Lydia, 1902; Everett, 1905; Albert, 1907; Dorothy, 1910.

 

GARLOCK 

History of Ontario Co, NY and Its People, Pub. 1911, Vol. II, pg. 33 -35

 

Charles H. GARLOCK, who has for many years served as trustee of the village of Phelps, Ontario county, New York, and is prominently connected with the financial and commercial interests of the county, is a descendant of one of the early Dutch settlers of this country, his great-great grandfather having come to America from Holland. Another of his ancestors was Peter COOK, who was a native of New Jersey.

(III)  Peter, son of Abram and Catharine (Cook) GARLOCK (q.v.) was one of 9 children and was born in Phelps, Ontario county, New York, October 6, 1832, died Feb 17, 1904.  Twenty seven years of his life were spent in Arcadia, New York, and he then made his permanent and final home in Phelps.  In 1863 he commenced the distilling of cider brandy and peppermint oil, about two and one half miles southwest of Newark, New York continuing this plant for the distilling of cider brandy until about 1893, when he discontinued.  In 1879 he built a cider mill in Phelps, New York, and in 1885 he added to the plant and put in new and improved machinery.  The plant then had a capacity of 3,000 barrels of cider annually, and this was constantly being increased as the demand for the excellent product became more extended.  In 1890 he admitted his son, Charles H., to a partnership in the business, under the firm name of P. Garlock & Son.  Mr. GARLOCK married (first), in 1857, Maria VAN DE VORT, of Phelps, who died in 1886 (died Mar 27, 1886).  Children: Ellen, married O. M. LINCOLN; Abram, Thomas, Charles H., Kate, Alfred & Jessie M.  He married (second), Cecelia SMITH, of Rochester, New York; children: Arthur & Grace

(IV)  Charles H., son of Peter and Maria (Van De Vort) GARLOCK, was born in Arcadia, Wayne county, New York, May 7, 1864.  His education was acquired in the public schools and in the Newark Union School, and he was engaged in various occupations until he had attained his majority. At the age of 21 years, he went to South Dakota, and accepted a position in the hardware store of his brother, Thomas, remaining with him 2 years.  He then went to Denver, Colorado, in which city he opened a cigar and confectionery store, in which he was successfully engaged for one year.  He abandoned this in 1889, in order to return to the east and enter into the partnership which had been proffered by his father.  His energy and enterprise soon occasioned many innovations to be introduced, to the great benefit of the enterprise, and upon the death of his father, Charles H. GARLOCK purchased his interest in the business, uniting them with his own.  In 1910 he decided to incorporate the concern, a proceeding which was immediately put into effect, and a stock company organized.  Charles H. GARLOCK is the president of this company; C. W. KELLY, vice president; and J. Fred HELMER, secretary and treasurer.  It is know commercially as the P. Garlock Company, and has largely increased facilities for the manufacture of their wares, this being rendered imperative by the increased demand.  The annual output at the present time is from 5 to 10 thousand barrels of cider and from 3 to 5 hundred barrels of apple brandy.  The demands which his position as president of this important corporation make upon his time do not prevent Mr. GARLOCK from being actively interested in a number of other enterprises.  July 27, 1910, Mr. GARLOCK was the leading spirit in the organization of the Phelps National Bank, of which he was elected president, and under his able management this undertaking is proving a decided success.  The Phelps National Bank of Phelps, New York, is one of the substantial financial institutions; the bank was opened for business, September 8, 1910 and it is receiving the patronage of a large number of people.  The officers are: Charles H. GARLOCK, president; A. T. VAN NOSTRAND, vice-president; J. Fred HELMER, cashier; Mae C. VAN BUREN, assistant cashier. 

 

(A table appears here as a financial statement  made December 8, 1910, when the bank was but 3 months old, of $123,858.32)

 

He is also closely identified with the public affairs of the town, was elected as trustee of the village of Phelps, and re elected in 1908, and is in office at the present time.  In political belief, he is a Democrat.  His fraternal associations are with Sincerity Lodge No. 200, Free and Accepted Masons, and he as served as treasurer since 1908.

 

Mr. GARLOCK married June 12, 1895, Mrs. Mary E. BULKLEY, daughter of John HOSFORD, of Phelps.  By her first marriage, she was the mother of Minnie A., who is now the wife of Marvin H. DURAND; they had 2 children, Marvin and Lois M.  Children of Mr. and Mrs. GARLOCK: Marjorie H., born May 14, 1896; Jessie I., born Oct 12, 1899; John M., born March 19, 1906 (he died June 23, 1913 & buried in Phelps Village cemetery).

 

GARRATT  

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893 pg 74 -75

GARRATT, William, Canandaigua, was born in Stanley, Seneca county, March 7, 1854, a son of Charles, a farmer of that town, who came to this country from England in 1850.  He had 10 children, of whom William was the fifth son.  The latter's boyhood was spent in Seneca county, and he was educated in the common schools of Seneca and Ontario counties.  His father moved into Gorham in 1865, where he died August 26, 1889, at 73 years of age.  Our subject lived on the farm until he was 21 years of age, and then engaged in the manufacture of carriage and wagon spokes, which business he has since followed.  In the fall of 1880 he moved into Canandaigua, where he bought out the small spoke factory of his brother John, and increased the capacity of the mill by the addition of new machinery, and enlarging the building.  Mr. GARRATT is also a dealer in all kinds of hard wood lumber and kindling wood.  The spokes manufactured by Mr. GARRATT are shipped all through New York and the Eastern States.  Mr. GARRATT also conducts farms in this vicinity aggregating 269 acres.  He married in 1888 Carrie E., daughter of O. E. BROCKLEBANK, a carpenter of Canandaigua, and they have one child, Charles A., now in his third year.  The mill is located at the foot of Main street, and his residence is near on the Lake Road.  The mother of our subject, Hannah (HIBBELL) GARRATT, is a resident of Canandaigua, now in her 76th year.

GARTLAND

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 77   

 

John GARTLAND Jr., Canandaigua, was born in Canandaigua October 25, 1859, a son of John, a native of Ireland, who came to this country in 1849 and located in Canandaigua.  John Jr., was educated in the common schools and early in life engaged in butchering, which he has always followed.  October 26, 1887, he, in company with William BOYLE, established a market in Canandaigua which they conducted together until August, 1892, when Mr. GARTLAND bought out the interest of Mr. BOYLE and has since conducted the market alone.  He has a commodious market at 153 Main street, where he carries a large stock of fresh and salt meats, game and poultry, and in the rear conducts a sausage manufactory.  Mr. GARTLAND married, June 30, 1885, Jennie E., daughter of Terrence CLARKE, and they are the parents of three children: Willie C., Annie M., John Leo Edward.  Mr. and Mrs. GARTLAND are members of the Catholic Church.

 

GARYAN-WAH-GAH  or "CORNPLANTER"

History of Ontario Co, NY & Its People, Pub. 1911, Vol. I, pg. 29 

Cornplanter was a Seneca Chief; born in Conewaugus, on the Genesee river, in 1732; died on the Cornplanter reservation in Pennsylvania, February 17, 1836; was a half breed, son of an Indian trader named John O'BAIL.  He was a warrior of undoubted prowess, and led the Seneca allies of the British in the War of the Revolution in forays upon the patriot settlements in New York and Northern Pennsylvania, but after its close became the firm friend of the Americans and aided in securing the Fort Stanwix treaty of 1784; also took prominent part in the council at Au Glaize in 1792 and in that in Canandaigua in 1794; was often a jealous rival of RED JACKET.

 

GATCHEL 

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 225 - 226 

GATCHEL Family, Origin and Descendants of the.--1st, William GATCHEL, grandfather and great-grandfather to the generation of descendants now living, was born April 13, 1733, birthplace not known, but lived in the town of Chazy, near Lake Champlain, in northern part of New York State.  At an early date he married Eunice GRAVES, by whom he had the following children, to wit:  William, Nancy, Don A., Harvey, Saphronia and Lamentta.

William GATCHEL died January 24, 1805.  2d, William GATCHEL, father of the present living generation, was born in of Chazy, November 7, 1796.  At an early age the family removed to Oneida county, this State, where he learned the clothier's trade, which he followed successively for several years. In 1821 he left his parental and came to Farmington, Ontario county.  April 2, 1822, he married Huldah HERENDEEN, daughter of Welcome HERENDEEN, one of the first pioneer settlers in town (Farmington).  By this marriage four children came to bless their home, namely: William H., Welcome D., Harriet A., and Arthur M.  These children are all living and situated as follows:  William H., now owns and lives on the homestead farm; Welcome D., now living in Louisville, Ky., a seller of photo stock supplies, married Frances TRIPP of Walworth, Wayne county, NY, March 19, 1856.  Four children were born to them, to wit: Mary, now married and living in West Virginia; next came Albert D., now living at Birmingham, Ala.; Willie A., who died at the age of four; and Frank T., a recent graduate at Yale College.  Harriet A. married Theodore E. LAWRENCE, formerly of Cayuga county, NY, March 24, 1875.  They have one son, William.  Mr. LAWRENCE died October 7, 1888.  He had successfully followed farming for a business.  Arthur M., unmarried, is now living on the old home farm with his elder brother and widowed sister and son.  William GATCHEL, the father, died September 23, 1871.  Huldah GATCHEL, the wife, died November 7, 1868.

 

 

GATES

History of Ontario County, NY, Pub. 1878, Pg. 163 

Joseph Brown GATES the chief subject of this sketch, was born in Hopewell, Ontario County, New York, April 28, 1802.  At the present writing he is in his 75th year and resides on the farm where he was born, and where he has always resided, three and one-half miles east of Canandaigua, on the old turnpike road.  His father, Daniel GATES, was one of the first settlers in Ontario County, having emigrated hither from Rutland county, Vermont, in the year 1789.  Soon after his settlement in Gorham (now Hopewell), his wife died, leaving him a family of 9 children.  About the year 1793, he married Milcah BROWN, widow of Joseph BROWN, of Vermont.  As the result of his second marriage, there were five children born to them, Esther, Cyrus, Moses S., Joseph B. and Fordys. 

All of this second family settled in the neighborhood of their birthplace, Joseph B., succeeding to the old homestead.  On the 22nd of October, 1829, Joseph B., was married to Pamelia B. COOK.  He lead a quiet, industrious farmer life through all the subsequent years of activity.  Careful and prudent in all his business concerns, he gathered about his home the comforts and privileges well earned by toil, and gave his five children the benefits of a good academical education.  He has ever borne both a character and reputation of unquestionable integrity.  Preferring to suffer wrong rather than to do wrong, he never had a contested lawsuit, either as plaintiff or defendant.  Being one of the most highly respected citizens of Ontario county, he has been many times urged to allow his name to be used in reference to places of public trust; but he studiously declined such proffered honors, and hence never was a candidate for any official position, and never held any office above school trustee.  Always leading an exemplary, moral life, he for many years was a regular attendant and supporter of the Presbyterian church in Hopewell, and afterwards of the Wesleyan Methodist church at Hopewell Centre, to which his wife was joined.  In September, 1869, after forty years of contented marriage, his companion in life was separated from him by death.  His five children are living to respect and honor him in his advanced years. 

(see Pamelia Bishop COOK for sketch on Joseph's wife)    (Under Settlement, pg 159)

A worthy pioneer form the "Green Mountain State", was Daniel GATES, who with a family of four children, emigrated from Vermont in 1798, and located on lot 22.  A venerable son, Mr. Joseph B. GATES, resides on the old homestead, where he was born April 28, 1802.  He has five children living, viz: Elisha L. and Mary M., residing in the town; Daniel N., in Minnesota; J. Spencer, in Illinois, and John C., in Iowa.  Daniel WARREN, Shubeal CLARK, and Daniel GATES Jr., were early settlers on this lot.  

 

 

 

GATES

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 77 - 78

 

GATES, Curtis C., West Bloomfield, was born August 3, 1809.  His father, Marvin, was born in 1757 and came from Colchester, Conn., a year later than his brother Daniel.  In 1799 he built the house, now the property of Curtis, and occupied by Charles HOPKINS of North Bloomfield.  Marvin was a farmer, and in company with his brother Daniel was interested in a saw-mill at that place, also making brick there, early in the present century.  January 16, 1798, Marvin married Rachel COE of Granville, Mass., born in 1768.  Their children were Orpha, Melancton, Marvin, Reynold and Curtis Coe.  With Daniel and Marvin came their father, Captain Josiah GATES, a Revolutionary soldier, who was, however, too aged to enter into active work.  Orpha, the oldest child, married John LLOYD of this place in 1819, by whom she had ten children, of whom Eunice now makes her home with her Uncle Curtis, both parents being deceased.  Curtis C. has been three times married.  His first wife was Mercy Malvina LEACH, whom he married in 1838 and by whom he had one son, Robert Lewis, his only child, born in 1839.  He was in the 7th Ohio Infantry in the late war and was killed at the battle of Port Republic, Md., June 9, 1862.  An interesting relic in the shape of an old Bible, brought by Mrs. Marvin GATES from Massachusetts, bears date of 1754, Edinburgh.  Mrs. GATES was a descendant in the seventh generation of Robert "COOE" of Milford, Suffolkshire, England, who, with his wife Anna and three sons, sailed from Ipswich April 10, 1634.

 

GATES  

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 299

GATES, Preston L., West Bloomfield, son of Alfred, was born September 30, 1842.  His grandfather, Daniel, who, with his brother Marvin, was a pioneer in that part of the town (then known as Smith's Mill's), came from Colchester, near New London, Conn., in May, 1789.  He was the first comer by one year.  The old homestead was built in 1802, and is one of the few ancient landmarks of the locality.  Of his family Alfred was born January 25, 1807, and married Catharine PRATT of this town, by whom he had two children; Preston L. and Catharine, the latter dying at the age of 21 years.  His wife died in 1844, and he married second Sarah Emeline PRATT, sister of his first wife, who now resides on the old homestead.  Alfred died in April, 1890, at the age of 86 years.  Preston L. was educated at the district schools and has always followed farming.  For the past 20 years he has had charge of the old farm.  He married in 1866 Helen R., daughter of George DAVIS, of Honeoye Falls, and they have two sons: Lewis E., born in 1867, married and resides on the old homestead; and Alfred D., born in 1871, lives with his parents.  Mr. GATES is a Prohibitionist in politics.  He lives on the old place on which he has erected a fine modern house.  He is increasing his dairy interests, introducing Jersey stock, and is the owner of many fine animals of that breed.  He is also interested in the culture of bees and fancy poultry.

 

 

 

GAUSS

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 75   

GAUSS, Ashman B., East Bloomfield, was born on the farm where he now resides, February 24, 1831, a son of Thayer and Electa (BEEBE) GAUSS.  The grandfather, Benjamin, came to Bloomfield and married Sarah CODDING of Bristol, (the first white woman married on the Phelps and Gorham purchase), and in 1789 left Berkshire, Mass., and settled on 320 acres of land where subject resides, where Benjamin lived until his death, October 5, 1854, aged 89 years.  Benjamin served through the Revolutionary war, and lost his toes by being frozen.  His wife died January 22, 1847, aged 79 years.  They had six children: Benjamin Jr., Thayer, Sally, Phoebe, Mary and Abbie.  His son, Thayer, was born April 27, 1797, in the house where subject now resides.  He was the owner of considerable real estate, and during the War of 1812 he traded in Buffalo.  He was one of the trustees of the Congregational Church for over 40 years, and contributed liberally to public improvements.  He died December 19, 1879, and his wife February 11, 1883, aged 78 years.  She was the daughter of Ashman BEEBE, an old settler of East Bloomfield.  Thayer GAUSS and wife had five children: Eliza and Electa (twins), Lurinda, and Ashman B., besides one who died in infancy.  Our subject has remodeled his father's and grandfather's home (which has been in the family since 1793), and occupies 160 acres of the half section taken by his grandfather.  He married, October 21, 1858, Mary L., daughter of Lewis and Mary (TALMADGE) GOODWIN, who came from Plymouth, Conn., to Gates, Monroe county.  Mr. and Mrs. GAUSS have had three children: Lewis T., Lucy H., and Charles T.  Mr. and Mrs. GAUSS is a member of the Episcopal Church.

 

 

 

GAYLORD 

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 235 - 236

GAYLORD, Philotus, father of Sarah D. MALLETT, was born in South Hadley, Mass., April 7, 1813.  His father was killed by the falling of a mill stone, leaving 7 children, the eldest only 14, and the subject of this sketch only 9 years of age.  The farm was not out of debt, and the children were put out among neighboring farmers to earn their board and "keeping," while the eldest tilled the farm and paid off the debt of $300, which at that time was considered a large sum.  Philotus was taken by Captain Hiram SMITH and educated in the common schools of his days, until old enough to put to a trade.  He was then apprenticed to a Mr. MOODY to learn the carpenter's trade.  His work was mostly bridge building, and not content with such a life, he left Massachusetts, coming to New York State in 1833, where he finished learning the carpenter's trade with T. JUDD in Bath.  He married Elizabeth BUCHANAN, of Bath, Steuben county, November 10, 1834, and moved to Geneva in the spring of 1835, where he also studied architecture, becoming later on a master architect and builder.  For a short time he was engaged in the sash and blind business with S. WILSON, where he met with some reverses in business; he then entered into co-partnership with his cousin, Andre SMITH, also a Massachusetts man, and they employed from 25 to 30 hands, erecting some of the best business blocks in Geneva, also two churches, viz, St. Peter's Memorial Church, and St. John's Chapel for Hobart College; besides many fine residences.  He was much esteemed in this community and held public office several terms, assessor, trustee, and president of Board of Health, being a village trustee at the time of his death which occurred October 27, 1881.  There were born to Mr. and Mrs. GAYLORD fourteen children, all born in Geneva.  Jerusha, the eldest, was twice married, first to Chester H. WOOD, of Bellona, Yates county, and they had three children, as follows: Ella L., Martha E., and George D., the latter being the only survivor.  Mr. WOOD was a soldier in the Civil war and was killed in the battle of the Wilderness.  She married second Rush S. PROBASCO, and they had three children: Mary E., Henry C., and Grace E.  Andre S. married Sarah E. SAWYER of Seneca Falls, and had 7 children, three of whom survive: Andre S. Jr., Sarah E., and Frederick L.  John B. married Anna M. HOWARD, of Holyoke, Mass., and had nine children, 8 of whom survive: Adeline F., Willis H., Philotus, Agnes, James W., Herbert L., and Melvin S. (twins), Elizabeth and Sarah E.  John B. died June 21, 1891.  Sarah D. married George S. MALLETT, formerly of Kessinglard, England, a soldier in the Civil war, who died of yellow fever at Newbern, NC, October 9, 1864.  Josiah A. married Alice HENRY, of Fort Madison, Ia., and have 7 children: Harry L., Anna M., Edith M., W. Burton, Etta M., Arthur, Helen G.  Emily B. married James F. COE, of Benton, Yates county.  They have 4 children: Perry S., Edith G., Hatty E., and James M.  Mrs. COE died March 25, 1892.  The children are cared for at the old home in Geneva.  Hatty L. married Rev. George H. CORNELL, of Schuyler county.  They had one child, Percy W., who died at Pueblo, Col., 1886.  Eight of the 14 children have died.  Anna A. resides at home, unmarried.  Mrs. GAYLORD's father, John BUCHANAN, was a soldier in the War of 1812, and died as a result of his wounds.  Rush S. PROBASCO enlisted twice in the War of the Rebellion.  The second time in Co. E, 1st Veteran Cavalry, and was honorably mustered out in Camp Pratt, Kanawha Valley, W. Va., July 20, 1865.

 

 

 

 

GEROW

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893 pg 75 - 76

 

GEROW, Thomas H., Phelps, only son of six children of Oliver and Lucy (HOWARD) GEROW, was born in Phelps, March 26, 1832.  Oliver, the father, was born in Westchester county, and came to Phelps in early life.  Lucy HOWARD, the mother, was born in Dutchess county.  Thomas H. married Harriet A. PARDEE of Phelps, daughter of Israel and Phirza (CROSBY) PARDEE, and they have three children: Gertrude (Mrs. Albert WILLIAMS), Hattie H., and Milton P.  Mr. GEROW'S farm of 100 acres is used principally for grain.  He is a representative citizen, and has served the town as road commissioner continuously for eight years.

 

 

 

GIBSON

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 487 - 493    

GIBSON, Henry B. The distinguished early citizen of Canandaigua was born in Reading, Penn., April 13, 1783.  His father was John GIBSON, of Irish ancestry, who removed to Saratoga, NY, when Henry B., was nine years of age.  The son's education was principally obtained in Saratoga, a career at the bar having been designed for him by his parents; but his studies developed an unusual natural aptitude for mathematics and an inclination towards commercial life which finally determined his occupations for life.  He accordingly left home at sixteen years of age for Cooperstown, where he entered the employ of the leading merchant of the place, Judge COOPER, father of James Fenimore COOPER, the famous novelist, who was Mr. GIBSON's lifelong friend.  After a period in the capacity of clerk,

he sought a broader field by removal to Utica about 1808 with Mr. Hugh CUNNINGHAM, one of the early merchants of that village.  This connection continued only a short time, when Mr. GIBSON accepted employment in the county clerk's office under Francis A. BLOODGOOD, until 1812, when he was appointed teller in the Bank of Utica.  This position he soon resigned, owing to some minor disagreement with the cashier, Washington HUNT.  Mr. GIBSON had already and thus early in his life set his mind fully and with characteristic determination upon becoming a successful man of business, and he clearly saw the road that must inevitably be traveled to that goal.  His passing years were noted for unflagging industry, exceeding frugality for one at his time of life, and those personal habits of temperance in all things, which he practiced to the end of his life.  His small savings he early made to contribute to his earnings by loaning them in small amounts, evincing in such transactions the germs of the great business sagacity he afterwards displayed. 

In the year 1802 Watts SHERMAN, who afterwards became Mr. GIBSON's partner in law, formed a partnership in mercantile business in Utica with Arnold WELLS (as we learn from a history of that city lately edited by Dr. M. M. BAGG).  Mr. SHERMAN was one of the pioneers of Utica, locating there in 1795, and for a time working as a cabinet-maker, but afterwards becoming a merchant.  He was from Newport, RI, and descended from an old and prominent family.  Mr. SHERMAN was more ambitious for advancement than his partner and they soon separated, Mr. SHERMAN largely extending his operations.  He was one of the most prominent men in founding the first glass works there, with the factory at Vernon and was one of the directors of the company.  Under date of May 1813, he informed the public that he had taken into partnership Henry B. GIBSON and Alexander SEYMOUR, under the firm name of Sherman, Gibson & Co.  The junior member of this firm remained and carried on the business in Utica, while Mr. SHERMAN and Mr. GIBSON went to New York city and established a wholesale house.  Meanwhile and on December 9, 1812, only a few months prior to the formation of the business partnership just described, Mr. GIBSON formed a still more intimate relation with the family of his partner by marrying his daughter, Miss Sarah.  Mr. GIBSON's business operations in New York continued until 1819, and with remarkable success for that period. 

At the end of that time he found himself the possessor of about $30,000, a considerable fortune in those early years when the millionaires of the country were very few in number.  In the year 1813 the Ontario Bank was founded in Canandaigua, with many of the leading men of that section included in its direction.  It had started under apparently favorable auspices; had erected in 1813 a large and imposing bank building, still standing on Main street, and entered into competition for the banking business of what is now Western New York.  But its affairs did not prosper as had been anticipated and it was determined to change to some extent the management.  Mr. GIBSON's reputation as a skillful and prudent financier had preceded him to Ontario county, and indeed was more or less known through his New York commercial connections throughout the State.  The result was that he was invited to accept the cashiership of this bank, which he did and entered upon his duties in 1820.  It is more than probable that his acceptance of this office in a bank located in a rural community, where the actual payment for his services could not possibly approach in amount what he might reasonably hope to gain in business in the metropolis, was prompted to a large extent by his predilection for that highest of all commercial occupation, the conduct of a bank and the possibilities thereby opened for the exhibition of financial skill and large financial transactions.  Mr. GIBSON attacked the task before him of placing the affairs of the Ontario Bank upon a foundation that would commend it to the business community and secure the confidence of depositors, with the utmost vigor and all of his accustomed industry.  That he was from the first and during all of his long connection with the institution eminently successful is only another evidence of his thorough fitness for such a post and his consummate ability as a financier; while his personal characteristics were such as to win for him in all business circles the utmost confidence.  This unbounded confidence was of such a character that in the minds of many he came to be considered a special favorite of fortune, and it was a common expression that every operation in which he took an interest could not fail.  The calmer judgment of later years defined the elements of his success more clearly and it was seen that success followed his undertakings wholly because he had the judgment, foresight and sagacity to see from the beginning the sure results of following certain well known business methods; that he was successful because he deserved to be on account of his industry, shrewdness, integrity and rigid adherence to the principles of temperance, the latter being always kept in view by him.  His bank became one of the best known and most successful in the interior of the State, while through it and his other extensive operations he amassed one of the largest fortunes of the time outside of the great business centers of the country. 

It was written of Mr. GIBSON at the time of his death by one who knew him intimately, that "his character was so strongly marked as to impress his individuality upon all who knew him.  His great aim was to succeed in business by an honorable course.  His fortune was won by those qualities, which bring success in any avocation.  His management of the Ontario Bank was uniformly prosperous, and it was his boast that it was so because he devoted himself solely to banking and not to outside speculation.  He was not a cold and crafty man in any sense, but was ardent in his temperament, impulsive in his kindness as well as in his displeasure, artless and open in his intercourse and was never betrayed into ostentation or arrogance.  He was singularly quick in his perceptions and leaped to conclusions.  He was rigid in temperance and regular in all of his habits, and his commercial integrity was beyond suspicion." 

Mr. GIBSON's benevolence was of a practical character and his respect for and belief in the beneficence of all religious organizations led him to ready contribution to their support.  With politics, excepting as they influenced the prosperity of the community, he seldom interfered, and never wished for nor accepted purely political preferment.  He held the office of county clerk from 1843 to 1849.  He felt a deep interest in the early railroads and gave them practical aid; was president of the Auburn and Rochester Road and after the consolidation which brought into existence the New York Central he held the office of director.  He was a man who in many ways left a marked impression upon the community and inspired in many instances which can never be definitely specified an example to the young that could not fail to be salutary.  It was well said of Mr. GIBSON by one who knew him intimately "That in his management of the bank he was never seduced to receive hazardous paper by any prospect of unusual gain."  His death took place in Canandaigua on the 20th of November 1863.  Mrs. GIBSON died June 28, 1881.  They had 9 children, three of whom were sons; one of the latter died in infancy.  His daughter, Catharine O. GIBSON, married in 1838 Henry Livingston LANSING, and is the only one of the nine children now (1893) surviving.  She resides in the old Ontario Bank building in Canandaigua, which has been converted into a residence.

 

 

 

GIBSON

History of Ontario Co, NY & Its People, Pub. 1911, Vol. I, pg. 282 

Henry B. GIBSON was born in Reading, Pa., April 13, 1783.  Educated at Saratoga, NY, he began business career at Cooperstown, then moved to Utica, where on December 9, 1812, he married Miss Sarah, daughter of Watts SHERMAN, the famous banker, with whom he was afterwards associated in business.  Came to Canandaigua in 1820 to take charge of the Ontario Bank, which he managed with signal success until the expiration of its charter in 1856, when he retired with a fortune estimated at $1,000,000.  Was elected President of the Rochester and Auburn Railroad upon its completion in 1840.  Continued to reside in Canandaigua until his death, November 20, 1863, in the 81st year of his age.  

 

GIFFORD

History of Ontario County, NY, Pub. 1878, pg. 175 

Mr. E. F. GIFFORD located upon the farm where he now resides in the year 1850.  It was a poor tract, and in a dilapidated condition.  He immediately began a series of improvements which ultimately placed this farm in the front rank.  Mr. G. is a skillful agriculturist, and has succeeded, after long years of patient labor, in transforming it to one of the finest farms for which "Old Ontario" is so justly celebrated.  A principal feature of the improvements was the planting of a line of maple trees on either side of the highway, which have flourished finely, and that portion of the highway now a delightfully shaded avenue. 

In 1860, Mr. GIFFFORD erected the fine dwelling beautifully represented on another page in this work.  The model residence was built after plans and specifications submitted by the celebrated architect, A. J. WARNER, of Rochester, assisted by Ruel TAYLOR, of Newark, Wayne county.  A view and plan of this dwelling was twice published in Moore's Rural New Yorker, and many homes throughout various parts of the country were erected from the plans of this complete and handsome rural residence.  Mr. GIFFORD is the possessor of about 200 acres of land, and is surrounded by all the attributes of a happy home.  

 

GIFFORD  

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 297

GIFFORD, Levi, Canandaigua, was born in Pittstown, Rensselaer county, December 22, 1818, a son of Nathaniel, a farmer of that county.  The early life of Levi was spent in Pittstown, and he was educated in the common schools.  After leaving school he taught about 11 years.  When 22 years of age he came to Ontario county, teaching in Gorham until 1845, when he bought a farm there.  This he sold in 1858 and bought the farm on the west shore of the lake where he has since made his home.  Mr. GIFFORD never gave any attention to politics or anything that would detract from his interest in his farm.  He died November 19, 1889.  He was three times married, and by his first wife, Alida VAN DERCOOK, had two children, but one now living, Mary Frances, wife of John DOUGLAS, of Troy.  Mrs. GIFFORD died September 29, 1849, and he married second Olive WEATHERWAX, of Schenectady county, who died December 21, 1853.  His present wife, Mary Jane WEATHERWAX, he married February 1, 1855, and they had eight children, seven of whom are living: O. Alida, wife of John P. SANFORD, of Gorham; Ella M., wife of O. J. COOLEY, of Canandaigua; Minnie E., wife of S. G. BATES, of Syracuse; Matilda, wife of E. D. SPANGLER, jeweler of Canandaigua; Paula, wife of M. S. ELDEN, an electrician of Williamsport, Pa.; Nathaniel J., who conducts the home farm; and David Dayton, an electrician of Syracuse.  The GIFFORD farm consists of 120 acres, on which the principal products are fruit and grain.  Nathaniel, manager of the farm, was born here March 29, 1867, and was educated at Canandaigua Academy under Prof. CLARKE, and Cook Academy of Schuyler county.  He married, March 13, 1890, Eva GIGNAC, of Troy, and they have two children, Ruth L. and Rachel.

 

GILLETTE 

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 236

GILLETTE, John, Canandaigua, was born in Palmyra, Wayne county, in November, 1839, a son of John GILLETTE, a farmer of that town where the early life of our subject was spent.  He prepared for college at the Palmyra Classical Union School.  After leaving school he entered the office of Aldrich & McClouth, of Palmyra, to study law.  He was admitted to the bar in June, 1863, and immediately opened an office in Canandaigua, where he began practicing, and has ever since been here.  He has built up an enviable reputation as a learned counsellor and brilliant speaker.  He has never taken any active interest in politics outside of the interest all republicans have in the success of the party ticket.

 

 

 

GILLETTE

History of Ontario Co.& Its People, Pub. 1911, Vol. II, pg. 381

John GILLETTE, a well known lawyer of Canandaigua, Ontario county, New York, is of that class of citizens, who, undemonstrative and unassuming, nevertheless form the character and mold the society of the community in which they live, by their force of character and honorable and unremitting efforts for advancement and improvement in every direction. He is the son of John GILLETTE and Margaret EATON. John GILLETTE was at one time a farmer, a native of Kinderhook, New York, who lived for a time in Albany New York, and removed to Wayne county, New York, about the time of the construction of the Erie canal.

John GILLETTE (2) was born in Palmyra, Wayne county, New York, November 18, 1838. He was a student at the Palmyra Classical School, from which he was graduated, and then commenced the reading of law in the office and under the preceptorship of Judge MC LOUTH, of Palmyra, being admitted to the bar in June, 1864. He removed to Canandaigua in the fall of the same year, and immediately opened an office and established himself in the practice of the profession, with which he has been successfully identified to the present time. His political affiliations have always been with the Republican party, to which he has given strong support.

Mr. GILLETTE married, 1865, Harriet A., daughter of William F. JARVIS and Harriet MAXON, of Palmyra, New York. Children: Margaret, married Assemblyman J. L. BURNETT, of Canandaigua, who died in April, 1907; George W., a lawyer who formerly was engaged in practice in Buffalo, New York, and is now connected with a manufacturing plant in Columbus, Ohio.

 

GILLIS

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 76  

 

GILLIS, Enos, Victor, was born in Argyle, Washington county, June 12, 1815, and came with his parents to Victor in 1826.  He was educated in the district schools and has always been a farmer.  He married twice, first on December 31, 1840, Eliza SNEDEKER, formerly of New Jersey.  They had two children, both deceased; one died in infancy and the other lived to be 27 years of age.  Mrs. GILLIS died June 9, 1817 (typo error, prob 1847), and he married second Catherine WELLS, of Victor.  They had one daughter, Jennie, who married Frank S. GALLUP of this town, February 23, 1882.  They had four children: Enos G., George M., Martha D. and Rose A.  Mr. GILLIS's father, John D. was born in Hebron, Washington county, was a blacksmith for a number of years, and afterwards a farmer.  He married Mary A. SMITH, and they had six children: Margaret, Robert R., Enos, Martha, John S., and Rosena.  Mrs.  GILLIS died November 27, 1892, and his father about 1873, aged 96 years.  His grandfather, Robert, and four brothers were in the Revolutionary War, all killed but himself and Joseph.  Mr. GILLIS has resided on the same location 67 years.

 

GILLIS  

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 300

GILLIS, John S., Victor, was born in Argyle, Washington county, July 17, 1823, and came with his parents to Victor in 1826.  He was educated in the public schools and was always a farmer.  December 30, 1847, he married Sarah, daughter of William and Catherine (McKINLEY) WELLS, and they had five children: William W., who is editor and proprietor of the Victor Herald, and married Harriet S. BUNDY, of Rochester; Mary V., died in the year 1870, aged 19 years; Martha, who married Joseph N. BRACE, of Shelby, Orleans county; Alexander P., who is a farmer with his father; and John D., who married Margaret CLINE, they also live on the farm.  Mrs. GILLIS's father, William WELLS, was born at Coxsackie, Greene county, April 16, 1797, and married Catherine McKINLEY, who was born June 3, 1799.  They had six children: Catherine, Peter, Sarah, Amelia, John, and William Alexander.  They came to Victor in 1835.  Mrs. GILLIS is a member of the Presbyterian church. Mr. GILLIS is a Democrat.

  

GILLIS   

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 300

GILLIS, Jerome Bonaparte, Victor, was born in Victor, April 23, 1853.  He was educated in the district schools and Victor Union School, and is a farmer.  April 13, 1886, he married Lucy, daughter of Edward and Sarah WILLIAMS, of Victor, and they have had three children: Edward R., born January 18, 1887; Harry J., who died in infancy; and Cora B., who died when she was 19 months old.  Mr. GILLIS's father, Robert R., was born in the town of Argyle, Washington county, October 22, 1812, and came with his parents to Victor when he was 10 years old.  He was a farmer.  He married Martha HART, of Victor, and had six children: Julia A., Maryette, Helen, Jerome B., James L., and Hart R.  Mrs. GILLIS's father, Edward WILLIAMS, was born in England, and came to the United States when a young man.  After a period of time he returned to England and married Sarah KAILSLEY, then returned to his adopted country.  They had 7 children, four survive: Phoebe, Emma, William, and Lucy.  In politics Mr. GILLIS is a republican.  The ancestry of the family are Scotch, English, and Welsh.

 

 

GILLIS

History of Ontario Co, NY and Its People, Pub. 1911, Vol. II, pg. 427 - 428 

Robert GILLIS and four brothers were soldiers in the Revolution and three of them were killed.  His brother Joseph survived the War.

     ( II ) John D., son of Robert GILLIS, was born in Hebron, Washington county, New York, in 1776.  He settled in Victor where he owned a farm of 125 acres.  He was a blacksmith by trade, and had a shop in which he followed this business until 1850.  In politics he was a Democrat, in religion a Methodist.  He died in May, 1873, nearly a hundred years old.  His brother, James GILLIS, was a member of congress, and father of James GILLIS, of the United States Navy.  He married Mary SMITH, who died in 1864.  Children:  Margaret; Robert R.; Enos; Martha; John S., mentioned below, and Rose Ann.

     ( III ) John Smith, son of John D. GILLIS, was born in Argyle, Washington county, New York, July 17, 1823, died October 10, 1896.  He came with his parents to Victor, New York, in 1826.  He was educated in the public schools, and always followed farming.  He married, December 30, 1847, Sarah, daughter of William and Catherine (McKINLEY) WELLS.  Children:  1. William W., born November 20, 1848, graduated from Cornell College in 1874, became editor and proprietor of the Victor Herald, a weekly newspaper; he died April 10, 1898; married Harriet S. BUNDY, of Rochester, and had one child, who died young.  2. Mary V., born in 1851, died in 1870.  3. Martha, born June 5, 1855, married Joseph BRACE, of Shelby, Orleans county.  4.  Alexander P., born October 16, 1856, married Julia CRAFT; children: Florence, born October 5, 1898; Mary, September 1, 1900; John C., November 4, 1903; Stanley Wells, July 20, 1906; Charles Alexander, June 15, 1909.  5. John D., mentioned below.

William WELLS mentioned above, was born at Coxsackie, New York, in Greene county, April 16, 1799, married Catherine McKINLEY, who was born June 6, 1799, and came in 1835 to Victor; children: Catherine, Peter, Sarah, Cornelia, John, William and Alexander WELLS.

     ( IV ) John D. ( 2 ), son of John Smith GILLIS, was born in Victor, October 12, 1859.  He attended the district schools of Victor village, and the Canandaigua Academy.  During his boyhood and afterward until the year 1889 he worked with his father on the homestead.  He and his brother, Alexander P., then took charge of the homestead and continued until 1902 when the farm was divided.  His brother had the house and the north part and he had the south part of the homestead.  In the spring of 1910 he sold the farm to John H. CROFT, and he now owns two farms east of Victor which occupy his time and attention.  In politics he is a Democrat, and is serving his third year as trustee of the incorporated village of Victor.  In religion he is a Methodist, and for twenty years he has been a steward of the church. 

He married Margaret CLINE, born January 2, 1861, in Rochester, New York.  She had two half-sisters: Carrie, born February 13, 1873, married Henry LeRoy BETTS, and had Henry LeRoy BETTS Jr., Henry LeRoy BETTS died in May 1905; Minnie, married _____ DOCKSTADER, and has five children.

 

GOODALE   

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 298

GOODALE, Charles S., Canandaigua, was born in Bristol, March 4, 1844, a son of Solomon Jr., and Samantha (BUCKLEY) GOODALE.  Solomon was a native and farmer of Bristol, and was the father of three children: George S., of St. Louis, Mo.; Leonard C., a farmer and lumber merchant of Bristol; and Charles S.  The boyhood of the latter was spent on the farm in Bristol, and he had an education in the common schools.  He was but 17 years of age when the Civil War broke out, and he enlisted in the 4th N. Y. Heavy Artillery, February 10, 1864, serving in the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, North Anna, before Petersburg, and many smaller engagements, being with the Second Corps in their service.  He was mustered out September 7, 1865, and returned home.  He engaged in farming in different places until 1871, when he bought a farm of 125 acres in Canandaigua, near Cheshire, since which he has added 265 acres, making now 390 acres, which is cultivated to grain and hay.  Mr. GOODALE also deals in sheep, for which he finds a market in New York city.  He has been assessor six consecutive years, and is a supporter of the Union church of Cheshire.  He married, December 15, 1868, Estella, daughter of Stephen and Samantha (SAWYER) STILES, by whom he had one daughter, Lillian, a student of Granger Place School in Canandaigua.  [Lillian later married Fred HUTCHENS]

 

 

GOODING

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, Pub 1893  Pg 73 & 74   

GOODING Family -  George GOODING, whose parents were natives of Massachusetts, was born in 1770, and came to this country about 1800.  He married Naomi WILDER, a native of Connecticut, by whom he had 12 children: 1. George, who married Achsah REED, died in 1883, and left 7 children: 2. Lovisa, married Allen BROWN; 3. Erastus, married and had one child, who was drowned when a lad; 4. Russell was born in 1809, and married in 1839 Betsey, daughter of Samuel THURBER, of New Hampshire, who lived in this town.  They had four children: a. Horace, born in 1840, served in the 160th N. Y. Vols., and died at Washington Hospital in January, 1863; b. Sarah married in 1865 Spencer MARTIN, a lawyer of Saginaw, Mich., who died November 13, 1871, leaving two children, Russell and Wells; c. Edwin, of East Bloomfield, who lives on the home farm; and d. Ella, who married Roswell LEE, of East Bloomfield.  Again taking up George GOODING's family; 5. Ann married Elizur BOOTH, and they had four children: 6. Roxana, married Seymour REED; 7. Naomi, married Samuel TAYLOR; 8. Chester, married Laura BOOTH, of Canandaigua; 9. Timothy, married Polly HICKS, of Canandaigua, and died January 15, 1883, aged 75 years; 10. Wells, born in 1821, never married and died in 1881; and the youngest, 11. Angeline, died in 1880, aged 50 years.  12. One child died in infancy.  Timothy and Wells GOODING accumulated large properties.   (Some burials in Bristol).  

 

GOODING  

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 251

GOODING, Chester A., Bristol Centre, was born in Canandaigua, February 22, 1840.  At the age of ten years he moved with his parents to Bloomfield, where he lived until 1861, when in October of that year he enlisted in Co. B, 85th New York Volunteers, and served with them two years.  He had been with them a short time when he was attacked with typhoid fever, and from that to rheumatism, until he was unfit for service, and was mustered out in August, 1863.  He returned to Canandaigua and engaged in farming, and has since followed that occupation.  On November 15, 1888, he married Emilie KAUFMAN of South Bristol.

GOODING  

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 296 - 297

GOODING, Spencer, Canandaigua, was born in Bristol, January 22, 1830, a son of Ephraim, a native of Massachusetts, born in 1793.  He came to Ontario county in 1819, and taught school in Bristol several years.  He married, about 1820, Corinthia SPENCER, of Bristol, said to be the first white female child born in the town of Bristol; she was born in 1797.  They had seven children, six of whom are living, all but one in this county.  Spencer was the second son.  His early days were spent working on the farm until he was 23 years of age.  He was educated in the common schools, Canandaigua Academy and Lima Seminary.  In 1853 he began the reading of law in the office of M. O. WILDER, at Bristol, and in the spring of 1855 he went into the office of Hon. E. G. LAPHAM and Judge J. C. SMITH, with whom he remained until admitted to the bar in September 1855.  He was afterwards admitted to the United States and circuit courts. He has ever since practiced his profession in Canandaigua.  Mr. GOODING has always taken an active interest in politics, and has held several political offices.  In 1858 he was elected country treasurer, and re-elected in 1861, and in 1880 he was elected police justice and re-elected in 1884.  Mr. GOODING is a member of Canandaigua Lodge No. 294, Excelsior Chapter 164, and Zenobia Commandery of Palmrya No. 42.  He married in 1856 Ann PITTS, of Bristol, and they have two children: M. S. GOODING, a dentist of Le Roy, and Edith A., a teacher.

 

 

GOODWIN

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 76 

GOODWIN, Russell B., East Bloomfield, was born in Hartford, Conn., December 18, 1810, a son of John and Anna (BELDEN) GOODWIN, a shoemaker and shoe dealer in Hartford and a descendant of Deacon John GOODWIN, who came from England and was one of the first settlers of Hartford, Conn.  Russell B. was one of seven sons.  He received a common school education, learned the tailor's trade, which he followed a short time, and was engaged nearly ten years in St. Louis.  October 12, 1859, he married Eliza STEELE, born in East Bloomfield June 6, 1823, a daughter of William and Eliza (PITKIN) STEELE.  Her grandfather Elisha STEELE, lived and died at Bethlehem Corners.  His wife was Susannah STRONG, by whom he had these children: Joel, Samuel, Rev. Nathaniel, Elisha, William, Rev. Julius, Joseph, Olive Hawley, Anna Sprague, Betsy, who married a Dr. HUMPHREY and died in Canaan, Conn.; Lucy Kassan and Margaret McKEAN.  William STEELE was born September 10, 1781, and died April 7, 1858, aged 77 years.  He came to East Bloomfield when a young man where he engaged in farming until his death.  His wife died May 30, 1886, aged 88 years.  She was born May 13, 1797, in East Hartford, a daughter of Levi and Abigail (BELDEN) PITKIN, who had three children, Eliza, Nathan S. and Abigail.  The children of William and Eliza STEELE were: Eliza, William, Joseph, Henry G. and Edward, the latter deceased.  Russell B. GOODWIN died in 1884, leaving a widow.  Mrs. GOODWIN was a prime mover in the organization of the Historical Society, of which she is secretary.  She springs from Deacon John STEELE, who came from Suffolk county, England, and was a pioneer of Hartford.

 

GOODMAN

History of Ontario Co, NY and Its People, Pub 1911, Vol II, pg. 207  

John GOODMAN was born in England.  When a young man he came with his family to this country and settled on a farm in Phelps, Ontario county, New York, where he lived until his death.

     ( II ) Henry H. GOODMAN, son of John GOODMAN, was born in England in 18__, and came with his parents to Phelps when he was only two years old.  He was educated in the public schools of Phelps and during his boyhood worked on his father's farm.  He went to Saginaw, Michigan when he was 20 years old and remained in that town during the next twelve years.  He followed lumbering for an occupation.  In 1882 he returned to Phelps and settled on a farm there.  He married in 1870, at Saginaw, Ella GIFFORD.  Children:  Charles H., mentioned below; Bert J.; William A.; Otis T.; Jesse R.; Maude, married Grover McKELL; two others who died in infancy.

     ( III ) Charles H. GOODMAN, son of Henry H. GOODMAN, was born in Saginaw, Michigan, August 9, 1872.  He attended the public schools of his native town, and after coming to Phelps with his parents, when he was ten years of age, he completed his education in the public schools.

He assisted his father on the farm at Phelps during his youth and has always followed farming.  He has been prosperous and successful in business.  He is prominent in social and public life.  In politics he is a republican.  He was elected highway commissioner in 1904 and 1906, and town superintendent of highways in 1909.  He is a member of the Maccabees and has been First Master of Guards and Lieutenant of the Commandery.

He married, November 10, 1892, Carrie E. SMITH, born February 2, 1870, daughter of Asahel and Adaline ( WRIGHT ) SMITH.  Children:  Raymond, born February 5, 1894; Ella May, born August 31, 1896, died aged four years; Leon Byron, born November 6, 1899; Carl Smith, born August 27, 1902.

 

GORHAM

History of Ontario Co, NY & Its People, Pub. 1911, Vol. I, pg. 17 

Nathaniel GORHAM, the elder, who was the associate of Mr. PHELPS in the management of the Phelps and Gorham property, and acted for the company in conferences with the Massachusetts State authorities and in the negotiations for the establishment of the Preemption line, was never a resident upon the Purchase.  His home was in Charleston, Mass., where he was born in 1738.  He died in Boston, Mass, in 1769.  His son, Nathaniel GORHAM, Jr., of whom unfortunately no portrait is known to exist, came to Canandaigua in 1769 and acted as the agent of his father in the immediate management of the business of the company.  He was an early Supervisor of the town, was President of the Ontario bank for a number of years, and held other important positions in the community.

Nathaniel GORHAM was one of the signers of the American Constitution -  go here to read more on his personal history. http://www.cr.nps.gov/history/online_books/constitution/bio17.htm

GORMAN

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893,  pg 75  

 

GORMAN, Hugh, Farmington, was born in County Down, Ireland, May 18, 1820.  He was educated in the schools of his day, and came to the United States in April, 1844.  June 27, 1851, he married Rose A. KEENAN, formerly of his native county.  The ceremony took place in New York city.  They had these children: Edward, who married Hannah DAYLOR, and have one son; Harry J., Henry and Mary, reside with their parents, and Rose, who married Garrett BURNS, who is a hotel keeper in Shortsville; they have one daughter, Mary.  Mr. GORMAN located in Farmington in 1855, and has been a resident of this country 49 years.

 

GOURLAY

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 80

 

GOURLAY, Norman, Farmington, father of Eli M. and Mark C. GOURLAY, was born in Forfarshire, Scotland, May 22, 1836, and came with his parents to the United States, landing in New York when he was four years old.  Afterwards they came to Glens Falls, where he was educated in the public schools and was a farmer until he retired.  He married twice, first on February 24, 1858, Relief MOORE of Queensbury, Warren county, and they had six children; two died in infancy, four survive:  Keziah P., and Mark C., who married Franc M. OUTHOUSE of Canandaigua, and has one child, a daughter.  Eli M. who is at present engaged at farming with his brother, Mark C., and Grace F.  Mrs. (Relief) GOURLAY died in 1886.  April 27, 1892, he married second (in 1906, Mary born abt 1848 in Canada) a widow lady in Victor.  Mr. GOURLAY enlisted in Co. A, 118th N. Y. S. Vols., and was honorably discharged June 27, 1865.  He is a member of Albert M. Murray Post, 162 G. A. R. (Note: he died between 1910-1920 and lived in Rochester, NY)

 

GRANGER 

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 236

GRANGER, Hon. Julius N., Clifton Springs, was born June 22, 1810, on the farm now owned by his wife, Sarah A. GRANGER.  Judge GRANGER during his eventful life was held in the highest esteem by all.  He served as justice of the peace when only 21 years of age, and filled the office for several terms thereafter; for several years was judge of sessions of Ontario county; for 18 years was recorder of the General Land Office at Washington; and for fourteen years an examiner in the pension office.  He was a staunch Democrat.  Mrs. Sarah A. GRANGER, his wife, is still living and enjoying the best of health.  She was born October 29, 1811.  She was the only sister of Stephen A. DOUGLASS, and was with him at Washington, when that talented and patriotic gentlemen was in the zenith of his fame.  Mrs. GRANGER possesses a considerable amount of the ability of the DOUGLASS family.  Her mind is as bright as ever, which is saying considerable for a lady of over 80 years of age, and she is a most interesting historian.  Mrs. GRANGER served as postmaster under the Cleveland administration.

GRANGER

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 469 - 475    

The name of GRANGER is a conspicuous one in the civil and political history of this State and nation, while its lustre has been for more than three-quarters of a century reflected upon the county of which this volume gives the history.  Two of the family held for many years one of the most honorable and responsible offices under the national government, as well as numerous other official positions in the State government, while three who honored Canandaigua with their residence were graduates of one of the foremost institutions of learning in this country, were illustrious members of the legal profession, and all were men of culture, refinement, integrity and the other good qualities that constitute the American citizen in his best estate.

The family is of English descent, their ancestor, Launcelot GRANGER, having come to this country from England in 1652 and settled at Newbury, in the Massachusetts Bay Colony.  Thence he removed to Suffield, Conn., in 1674, and here Gideon GRANGER was born July 19, 1767, the first of the name to make his home in Canandaigua.  We are not familiar with the details of his early life, except that he was given opportunity to obtain a liberal education, of which he availed himself, graduating from Yale College in 1787, at the age of twenty.  He entered upon the study of the law soon afterward, and rose to distinction in the bar of his native State.  He was a man of public spirit, and imbued with the Jeffersonian principles of free government.  He was early and deeply impressed with the importance of the most energetic work for the advancement of the public school system, and was one of the foremost laborers for the establishment of the public school fund in Connecticut, giving liberally himself towards its foundation, and being often called its father.  While still a young man his reputation had reached the national capital, and in 1801, when he was 35 years of age, he was called by President JEFFERSON to take a position in his cabinet as postmaster-general.  For 13 years he filled that honorable and responsible office, during which period he was instrumental in the rapid development of the great postal system of the country.  His administration of the office continued through both of Mr. JEFFERSON's terms as president, and most of Mr. MADISON's.  On his retirement from Washington in 1814, he settled in Canandaigua, whither his reputation had preceded him, and where he was at once accorded the station to which his abilities entitled him.  In 1820 he was elected to the State Senate, and in that body served two years.  He promptly took a leading position as a legislator, and became conspicuous in co-operation with Governor DeWitt CLINTON in promoting the great system of internal improvements of which the Erie Canal was the most important feature.  In 1821 he retired from public life, and died on the 31st day of December, 1822, at the comparatively early age of 55 years, leaving a record of a career distinguished for its purity, its spotless integrity, and its devotion to the public good.

Francis GRANGER, second son of Gideon GRANGER, was born in Suffield, Conn., on the 1st day of December 1792, and in 1811, at the age of 19 years, was graduated with honor from Yale College. He followed the example of his distinguished father by studying for the bar, and soon after the removal of the family to Canandaigua took up the practice of his profession in that village.  He promptly entered public life and for many years the suffrages of his constituents placed him in positions of honor and responsibility, where his natural and acquired qualifications enabled him to occupy the foremost rank.  A man of striking and commanding personality, polished manners, and courteous and dignified bearing, he soon drew to himself a host of warm friends and admirers, who lost no opportunity of demonstrating their confidence and esteem by conferring upon him such public honors as were at their disposal.  In 1826 he was elected to the State Legislature, where he served by re-elections in 1828, 1830 and 1832.  In that legislative body his winning personality, persuasive eloquence, sound judgment and practical ability gave him a commanding influence and won for him friends throughout the State.  Twice (in 1830 and 1832) he was nominated for governor of the State, and was defeated by an insignificant Democrat majority.  Under the then existing conditions of the great political parties, these defeats were in every sense a reason for congratulation to him and his political friends.  In 1836 he received the nomination for the vice-presidency of the nation, in the campaign of Gen HARRISON for the presidency, but the success of his party was destined to further postponement, as recorded in the political history of the country.  In 1835 he was nominated and elected to Congress, where he served with distinguished ability and influence until 1841, when he resigned to accept the high station so long and honorably filled by his father, the postmaster-generalship, General HARRISON having been elected to the presidency.  The duties of this office he discharged until the memorable disruption of the cabinet under President TYLER.  Declining a foreign mission, which had been tendered him, he was again pressed to accept the nomination for Congress, but his determination to retire from public life had become fixed and in the succeeding years he resisted all persuasion to again accept political preferment.  He, however, occasionally presided at meetings of his political friends when interests of more than common importance were at issue.  It was during his political career that the branch of the Whig party, which became known as the "Silver Grays" received its peculiar title in a convention of which he was the chairman, from his flowing locks of gray hair.

During the troubled era of 1861-65, when the very foundations of the Union were threatened, Mr. GRANGER was a staunch supporter of the government.  He was induced through the solicitation of many friends to go to Washington as one of the so called Peace Convention in 1861, in which he bore a conspicuous part in the proceedings held to avert the threatened war. 

It has been written of him, that "he was a man of great native intelligence, of quick wit, of warm heart, of popular manners, of imposing personal appearance, and of impressive speech, both in public and in private.  Few persons have had more friends in all parts of the country.  Webster and Clay, Preston and Crittenden, Edward EVERETT, Abbott LAWRENCE, and many more of all parties and sections, were on terms of intimacy with him, to which they admitted few others.  His nature was peculiarly attractive to young and old, and he seemed incapable of making an enemy of any one.  Singularly happy in his own temperament, he made everybody happy around him.  His sunny disposition was never quenched or clouded, either by disappointment or old age, and when he was at last called to die under circumstances full of sadness, he uttered no word of impatience or repining, but threw himself with quiet resignation and perfect trust upon the mercies of his God.  He died in Canandaigua on the 28th of August 1868, in the 76th year of his age.

Gideon GRANGER, son of Francis GRANGER, was born in Canandaigua, NY, on the 30th of August 1821.  His early life was surrounded by all the refinements of a beautiful home, and the most liberal opportunities for gaining a thorough education.

Like his father and his grandfather, he was a graduate of Yale College, where he took his degree in 1843.  Like them, too, he studied for the legal profession, and had he been so inclined, might without doubt have taken a foremost position at the bar.  Born with a heart in sympathy with suffering of all kinds, he gave much of his professional skill and time to the service of the poor and needy.  This was true also of the labor of his life outside of his profession; the empty hand or the troubled mind never sought his aid in vain.  Prevented by ill-health from serving his country in the field, he acted as chairman of the war committee for raising troops during the great struggle for the support of the Union, laboring faithfully to fill the depleted ranks of the army, and to care for the families left behind.  The widows and orphans of those who fell on the field he made his especial care, and his strength and substance were given out freely for their relief.  The revival of the Agricultural Society of the county was also largely due to his activity and interest.  Indeed, wherever and whenever a public good could be advanced, a charitable deed done, or a gentle word spoken, Gideon GRANGER was ever foremost, in every act of his daily life following the example of the Savior, to whose cause he had consecrated himself.

He died in Canandaigua, September 3, 1868, aged 47 years, 5 days after his father, Francis GRANGER.

John Albert GRANGER, third son of Gideon (Yale 1787) and Mindwell (PEASE) GRANGER, was born in Suffield, Conn., on the 11th day of September 1795, and died in Canandaigua, NY, on the 26th day of May 1870.

Originally intended for the navy, his early education, commenced in Suffield and there continued until the removal of the family to Washington, DC, was along lines of instruction which, when the idea of the sea was abandoned, found him without the classical training required for a college course.  He spent some years under the tutorage of "Parson" GAY, of Fairfield, Conn., a noted instructor in those days, from whose hands he entered a business career at an early age.  Some years were spent in Washington during the period of his father's connection with the cabinets of Jefferson and Madison (1801-1814), and at the time of the family leaving that city he went in advance to Whitestown, NY, (now Whitesboro), which place his father had decided on as their future home.

They had barely settled there, however, before a business connection with the Hon. Oliver PHELPS, of the Phelps and Gorham Purchase, induced their further removal to and permanent settlement in Canandaigua, which was ever after the family home.  He assisted his father largely in the building of the Granger homestead there and drew from the Genesee country most of the timber which constituted its frame.

In 1820 Mr. GRANGER married Julia Ann WILLIAMS, daughter of Dr. William Augustus WILLIAMS (Yale 1780), and Elizabeth CHAPIN, daughter of Gen. Israel CHAPIN, the United States agent to the Indians and commissioner of Indian affairs in the new county.  His wife died in 1822, leaving two daughters: Delia, who married Alexander JEFFREY, and died in 1847; and Julia, who married Sanders IRVING, nephew of Washington IRVING, still survives (1893).

In 1829 he married Harriet, daughter of Amasa and Mary (PHELPS) JACKSON and granddaughter of the Hon. Oliver PHELPS before referred to.

Mrs. GRANGER died in 1868, having had two children: Harriet Mindwell GRANGER, who married Caleb BRINTON, of Westchester, Pa., and died in 1860; and John Albert GRANGER (Yale 1855), who married Annie, daughter of Edwin D. TOWNSEND, of Palmyra, NY, and is still living (1893).

About the time of his first marriage Mr. GRANGER settled in the Genesee country at Moscow, Livingston county, where he lived with but few neighbors except the Indians, with whom he became very friendly and was adopted into their tribe.  Here he lived until the death of his wife left him with two children of such tender years that the simple care of them required services he could not obtain so far from neighbors, and he therefore returned to Canandaigua.  For a few years he was engaged in the mercantile business, and later acted as agent in the purchase of wool for some Boston houses, but about the year 1840 he retired from active business and devoted himself to the management of landed interests inherited from his father.  This he continued until his death, and in it found full employment.

At this period he became interested in and identified with the National Guard of the State, rising from subaltern to become major-general commanding the division.

His love for such service was very great, and he was not only a very zealous officer but a very liberal one, paying out of his own pocket--and largely too---very many of the expenses incident to the advancement of his command.

He was a strikingly handsome man, a superb horseman, and on the days of the annual parade and inspection made, with a brilliant staff and well drilled regiments, a display which would do credit to these days of Upton and State camps.

There was that in the character of Mr. GRANGER, which won esteem at the outset, and so nourished it that it soon became love and affection.  Generous and hospitable, almost to a fault it might be said, his hand was ever open, and his table ever spread to one in want.  No halting, trembling hand of the unfortunate, groping in the dark, amid cares and anxieties, but found his helping grasp with aid and brotherhood.

Save here and there an election to some unimportant local office he never sought or cared for political preferment.  He loved his home and his home loved him, and he passed in and out always with a tender, loving greeting, born in a warm heart and fostered by countless kindnesses to all.

His home life was but his outer life intensified.  The same genial courtliness and gentle courtesies were extended to all.  The coat made no difference to him.  His heart was full of cordial greetings he could not hide, nor did he seek to, and when the time came that he sickened and passed weary months in pain and steady sinking, the neighborhood, and village even, took on the shadow, crept into it, as it were, to share it with the family, and all made common sorrow and common mourning when he passed away.

He was a "just man, made perfect" when his time had come, and many a hand was raised in benison, and many a voice whispered benedictions at the end.

 

GRANGER

History of Ontario Co, NY & Its People, Pub. 1911, Vol. I, pg. 76 

Gideon GRANGER, eminent among the early settlers in Canandaigua, was a descendant of Launcelot GRANGER who came from England in 1652 and settled in the Massachusetts Bay Colony.  He was born at Suffield, Conn., July 19, 1767; graduated from Yale Collage in 1787; attained distinction at the bar and in politics, and in 1801 became Postmaster General, serving in that capacity through bout of President JEFFERSON's terms and most of President MADISON's.  On his retirement from Washington in 1814, Mr. GRANGER settled in Canandaigua.  In 1820-21, was a member of the State Senate from the Western District.  Died in Canandaigua, December 31, 1822.   

 

GRANGER

History of Ontario Co, NY & Its People, Pub. 1911, Vol. I, pg. 81 

Francis GRANGER, son of Gideon GRANGER, was born in Suffield, Conn., December 1, 1792; graduated from Yale College in 1811; removed with his father to Canandaigua in 1814; was a Member of Assembly form Ontario county from 1826 to 1828 and from 1830 to 1832; the unsuccessful anti-Masonic nominee for Governor of the State in 1830 and again in 1832, and in 1836 was the candidate for Vice President on the unsuccessful Whig ticket headed by General William H. HARRISON; elected to Congress in 1835, and being returned at successive elections, continued to hold that office until in 1841, when he was called by President HARRISON to serve as Postmaster General, a position which he filled, until upon the death of his chief, TYLER became President and the Harrison cabinet was disrupted.  Declining an appointment to a foreign mission and invitations to take other public office, he spent the rest of his life in comparative retirement in Canandaigua.  In was from Mr. GRANGER's beautiful gray locks that he administration branch of the Whig, party derived its name of "Silver Grays".  Mr. GRANGER died in Canandaigua, August 31, 1868.   

GRANGER

History of Ontario Co, NY & Its People, Pub. 1911, Vol. I, pg. 226 

Gideon GRANGER, 2nd, son of Francis GRANGER and grandson of Gideon GRANGER, was born in Canandaigua, August 30, 1821; graduated from Yale College in 1843; studied law and was admitted to the bar, but never engaged in practice.  Declined many opportunities to enter politics, but took an active interest in public affairs, particularly during the Civil War, when unable on account of ill health to serve in the army, he spent unstintingly time, strength, and means in support of the Union cause and in caring for the families of those who went to the front to fight the country's battles.  Was an official of the County Agricultural Society and otherwise prominently identified with movements for the public good.  Died in Canandaigua, September 3, 1868, five days following the death of his father.   

 

 

 

GRANGER

History of Ontario Co, NY and Its People, Pub 1911, Vol II, pg. 259 - 264  

The name of GRANGER is a conspicuous one in the civil and political history of this state and nation, while its lustre has been for more than three-quarters of a century reflected upon the county of which this volume gives the history.  Two of the family held for many years one of the most honorable and responsible offices under the national government, while three who honored Canandaigua with their residence were graduates of colleges and were illustrious members of the legal profession, men of culture, refinement, integrity and the other good qualities that constitute the American citizen in his best estate.

     ( I ) The family is of English descent, their ancestor, Launcelot GRANGER, having come to this country from England in 1652 and settled at Newbury, in the Massachusetts Bay Colony.  Thence he removed to Suffield, Connecticut, in 1674.

     ( II ) Gideon, son of Launcelot GRANGER, was born in Suffield, Connecticut, July 19, 1767, and was the first of the name to make his home in Canandaigua, New York.  We are not familiar with the details of his early life except that he was given opportunity to obtain a liberal education, of which he availed himself, graduating from Yale College in 1787, at the age of twenty.  He entered upon the study of the law soon afterward, and rose to distinction in the bar of his native state.  He was a man of public spirit, and imbued with the Jeffersonian principles of free government.  He was early and deeply impressed with the importance of the most energetic work for the advancement of the public school system, and was one of the foremost laborers for the establishment of the public school fund in Connecticut, giving liberally himself towards its foundation, and being often called its father.  While still a young man his reputation had reached the national capital, and in 1801 he was called by President JEFFERSON to take a position in his cabinet as postmaster-general.  For thirteen years he filled that honorable and responsible office, during which period he was instrumental in the rapid development of the great postal system of the country.  His administration of the office continued through both of Mr. JEFFERSON's terms as president, and most of Mr. MADISON's.  On his retirement from Washington in 1814, he settled in Canandaigua, whither his reputation had proceeded him, and where he was at once accorded the station to which his abilities entitled him.  In 1820 he was elected to the state senate, and in that body served two years.  He promptly took a leading position as a legislator, and became conspicuous in co-operation with Governor DeWitt CLINTON in promoting the great system of internal improvements of which the Erie Canal was the most important feature.  In 1821 he retired from public life, and died December 31, 1822, at the comparatively early age of 55 years, leaving a record of a career distinguished for its purity, its spotless integrity, and its devotion to the public good.  He married Mindwell PEASE.

     ( III ) Francis, second son of Gideon and Mindwell ( PEASE ) GRANGER, was born in Suffield, Connecticut, December 1, 1792, and in 1811, at the age of nineteen years, was graduated with honor from Yale College.  He followed the example of his distinguished father by studying for the bar, and soon after the removal of the family to Canandaigua took up the practice of his profession in that village.  He promptly entered public life and for many years the suffrages of his constituents placed him in positions of honor and responsibility, where his natural and acquired qualifications enabled him to occupy the foremost rank.  A man of striking and commanding personality, polished manners, and courteous and dignified bearing, he soon drew to himself a host of warm friends and admirers, who lost no opportunity of demonstrating their confidence and esteem by conferring upon him such public honors as were at their disposal.  In 1826 he was elected to the state legislature, where he served by reelections in 1828-30-32.  In that legislative body his winning personality, persuasive eloquence, sound judgment and practical ability gave him a commanding influence and won for him friends throughout the state.  Twice (in 1830 and 1832) he was nominated for governor of the state, and was defeated by an insignificant Democratic majority.  Under the then existing conditions of the great political parties, these defeats were in every sense a reason for congratulation to him and his political friends.  In 1836 he received the nomination for the vice-presidency of the nation, in the campaign of General Harrison for the presidency, but the success of his party was destined to further postponement, as recorded in the political history of the country.  In 1835 he was nominated and elected to congress, where he served with distinguished ability and influence until 1841, when he resigned to accept the high station so long and honorably filled by his father, the postmaster-generalship.  General HARRISON having been elected to the presidency.  The duties of this office he discharged until the memorable disruption of the cabinet under President TYLER.  Declining a foreign mission which had been tendered him, he was again pressed to accept the nomination for congress, but his determination to retire from public life had become fixed and in the succeeding years he resisted all persuasion to again accept political preferment.  He, however, occasionally presided at meetings of his political friends when interests of more than common importance were at issue.  It was during his political career that the branch of the Whig party which became known as the "Silver Grays" received its peculiar title in a convention of which he was the chairman, from his flowing locks of gray hair.  During the troubled era of 1861-65, when the very foundations of the Union were threatened, Mr. GRANGER was a staunch supporter of the government.  He was induced through the solicitation of many friends to go to Washington as one of the so-called peace convention in 1861, in which he bore a conspicuous part in the proceedings held to avert the threatened war.

It has been written of him that he was a man of great native intelligence, of quick wit, of warm heart, of popular manners, of imposing appearance, and of impressive speech, both in public and in private.  Few persons have had more friends in all parts of the country.  Webster and Clay, Preston and Crittenden, Edward EVERETT, Abbott LAWRENCE, and many more of all parties and sections, were on terms of intimacy with him, to which they admitted few others.  His nature was peculiarly attractive to young and old, and he seemed incapable of making an enemy of any one.  Singularly happy in his own temperament, he made everybody happy around him.  His sunny disposition was never quenched or clouded, either by disappointment or old age, and when he was at last called to die under circumstances full of sadness, he uttered no word of impatience or repining, but threw himself with quiet resignation and perfect trust upon the mercies of his God.  He died in Canandaigua, August 28, 1868, in the 76th year of his age.

He married Cornelia VAN RENSSELAER, of Utica, New York, who lived but a few years.  He was survived by his two children:  1. Cornelia Adeline, who married (first), John E. THAYER, of Boston, and (second), Robert C. WINTHROP; she died in 1894.  2. Gideon, see forward.

     ( IV ) Gideon, son of Francis and Cornelia ( VAN RENSSELAER ) GRANGER, was born in Canandaigua, New York, August 30, 1821.  His early life was surrounded by all the refinements of a beautiful home, and the most liberal opportunities for gaining a thorough education.  Like his father and his grandfather, he was a graduate of Yale College, where he took his degree in 1843.  Like them, too, he studied for the legal profession, and had he been so inclined might without doubt have taken a foremost position at the bar.  Born with a heart in sympathy with suffering of all kinds, he gave much of his professional skill and time to the service of the poor and needy.  This was true also of the labor of his life outside of his profession:  the empty hand or the troubled mind never sought his aid in vain.  Prevented by ill health from serving his country in the field, he acted as chairman of the war committee for raising troops during the great struggle for the support of the Union, laboring faithfully to fill the depleted ranks of the army, and to care for the families left behind.  The widows and orphans of those who fell on the field he made his special care, and his strength and substance were given out freely for their relief.  The revival of the Agricultural Society of the country was also largely due to his activity and interest, and he served as its secretary for 12 years.  Indeed, wherever and whenever a public good could be advanced, a charitable deed done, or a gentle word spoken, Gideon GRANGER was ever foremost, in every act of his daily life following the example of the Saviour, to whose cause he had consecrated himself.  He died in Canandaigua, September 3, 1868, aged 47 years, six days after his father, Francis GRANGER.

Gideon GRANGER married Isaphine PIERSON, of Canandaigua, 1868.  She died in 1903.  Their two children, Antoinette P. and Isaphine P., survive them and are living on the old homestead, which for 30 years was occupied by Granger Place School for Ladies from 1876 to 1906.

     ( III ) John Albert, third son of Gideon and Mindwell ( PEASE ) GRANGER, was born in Suffield, Connecticut, September 11, 1795, died in Canandaigua, New York, May 26, 1870.  Originally intended for the Navy, his early education, commenced in Suffield and there continued until the removal of the family to Washington, D. C., was along lines of instruction which, when the idea of the sea was abandoned, found him without the classical training required for a college course.  He spent some years under the tutorage of "Parson" GAY, of Fairfield, Connecticut, a noted instructor in those days, from whose hands he entered a business career at an early age.  Some years were spent in Washington during the period of his father's connection with the cabinets of JEFFERSON and MADISON (1801-14), and at the time of the family leaving that city he went in advance to Whitetown, New York, (Utica) which place his father had decided on as their future home.  They had barely settled there, however, before a business connection with the Hon. Oliver PHELPS, of the Phelps and Gorham purchase, induced their further removal to and permanent settlement in Canandaigua, which was ever after the family home.  He assisted his father largely in the building of the GRANGER homestead there and drew from the Genesee country most of the timber which constituted its frame.

In 1820 Mr. GRANGER married (first) ????, daughter of William Augustus WILLIAMS (Yale, 1780) and ???, daughter of General Israel CHAPIN, the United States agent to the Indians and commissioner of Indian affairs in the new county.  His wife died in 1822, leaving two daughters:  Delia, who married Alexander,JEFFREY, and died in 1847; and Julia, who married Sanders IRVING, a nephew of Washington IRVING, still survives (1893).  In 1829 he married (second) Harriet, daughter of Amasa and Mary ( PHELPS ) JACKSON and granddaughter of the Hon. Oliver PHELPS before referred to.  Mrs. GRANGER died in 1868, having had two children:  Harriet Mindwell, who married Caleb BRINTON, of Westchester, Pennsylvania, and died in 1860; and John Albert ( YALE, 1855 ), who married Annie, daughter of Edwin D. TOWNSEND, of Palmyra, New York.  He died in 1906.

About the time of his first marriage Mr. GRANGER settled in the Genesee country at Moscow, Livingston county, where he lived with but few neighbors except the Indians, with whom he became very friendly and was adopted into their tribe.  Here he lived until the death of his wife left him with two children of such tender years that the simple care of them required services he could not obtain so far from neighbors, and he therefore returned to Canandaigua.  For a few years he was engaged in the mercantile business, and later acted as agent in the purchase of wool for some Boston houses, but about the year 1840 he retired from active business to devoted himself to the management of landed interests inherited from his father.  This he continued until his death, and in it found full employment.  At this period he became interested in and identified with the National Guard of the state, rising from subaltern to become major-general commanding the division.  His liking for such service was very great, and he was not only a very zealous officer but a very liberal one, paying out of his own pocket---and largely, too---very many of the expenses incident to the advancement of his command.

He was a strikingly handsome man, a superb horseman, and on the days of the annual parade and inspection made, with a brilliant staff and well-drilled regiments, a display which would do credit to these days.  There was that in the character of Mr. GRANGER which won esteem at the outset, and so nourished it that it soon became affection.  Generous and hospitable, almost to a fault it might be said, his hand was ever open and his table ever spread to one in want.  No halting, trembling hand of the unfortunate, groping in the dark, amid cares and anxieties, but found his helping grasp with aid and brotherhood.  Save here and there an election to some unimportant local office he never sought or cared for political preferment.  He loved his home and his home loved him, and he passed in and out always with a tender, loving greeting, born in a warm heart and fostered by countless kindnesses to all.

 

GRANGER

History of Ontario Co, NY and Its People, Pub 1911, Vol II, pg. 264 - 267     

Henry Francis GRANGER, at one time an attorney and counselor at law in the city of New York, now for some years one of the largest stockholders and the president and manager of the Indian Splint Manufacturing Company of Geneva, Ontario county, New York, is a member of a family which has had representatives in this country for many years, and which has always been well represented when the rights and liberties of the country were in need of defence.  He belongs to that class of restless, energetic men whose whole lives are in incessant battle, and whose clear brains and executive ability bring order out of chaos and transmute ideas into wealth.

     ( I ) Zadock GRANGER, the great-great-grandfather of Henry Francis GRANGER, was born in Suffield county, Connecticut; enlisted in a Massachusetts regiment, and served as a Colonel during the Revolutionary War.  Later he removed to Halford's Landing, the present site of Rochester, New York.  His younger brother was killed at the battle of Bunker Hill.

     ( III ) Calvin GRANGER, grandson of the preceding, removed to Hornell, Steuben county, New York, where he resided until his death, in 1865.

     ( IV ) Henry Martyn, son of Calvin GRANGER, was born in Rochester, New York, August 13, 1835.  He was engaged in the general mercantile line and was recognized as a successful and up to date business man.  He was a trustee of the church in Hornell, New York, and was a liberal contributor to funds to be devoted to the furtherance of religious matters.  He married Sarah, daughter of Deacon Chauncey B. SMITH, who was born in 1800, and died in 1879, and who established the First Presbyterian Church in Hornell.  Mrs. GRANGER was a native of Hornell, was a devout worshipper and very active in church work.

     ( V ) Henry Francis, son of Henry Martyn and Sarah ( SMITH ) GRANGER, was born in Hornell, Steuben county, New York, August 18, 1868.  His ancestor Francis GRANGER was postmaster-general under President HARRISON, and was the son of Gideon GRANGER, who held the office of postmaster-general under President Thomas JEFFERSON.  At the conclusion of his preparatory education Henry Francis GRANGER matriculated at Columbia University, from the Law School of which he was graduated in 1892, and admitted to the bar in the same year.  The following year he associated himself in a partnership with James Lindsay GORDON, a member of the senate from Virginia, under the firm name of Granger & Gordon, with offices in New York City.  This association continued in force seven years, until the death of Mr. GORDON ended it; for the five following years Mr. GRANGER was engaged in independent practice.  At this time he turned his attention to a considerable extent to the commercial and manufacturing world, purchasing an interest in the Hogg Carpet Mills and the Hogg Manufacturing Company.  He immediately set about putting these on a modern and greatly improved basis; erected new and far better equipped mills, enlarged the plant, and finally consolidated with the Ettrick Mills, manufacturing carpets and worsted yarns.  At this time he was still keeping up his law practice in the city of New York, but finding that the manufacturing interests made constantly increasing demands upon his time and that he was unable to give his law practice the amount of attention which the important cases entrusted to him made imperative, he determined to abandon the law altogether and devote himself entirely to his manufacturing interests.  During this time he was most frequently at the Ettrick Mills, which were located at Worcester, Massachusetts; he remained there four years and was treasurer and general manager of the company.  In 1907 he sold out his share to Herman A. METZ, comptroller of New York City.

In March of the following year Mr. GRANGER bought out the Mayettes, of Canisteo, New York, who had patent rights in connection with the manufacturing plant known as the Indian Splint Manufacturing Company.  Mr. GRANGER commenced manufacturing in this enterprise with a force of four men, in November, 1908, and at the present time (1910) is employing upward of sixty men and is constantly increasing his working force.  It became necessary to increase their working space, after a few months of manufacturing, as the demand for their output was exceedingly active.  They accordingly removed to Geneva, New York, establishing themselves in quarters which they supposed would be sufficient for their needs for a considerable length of time; the popularity of their manufacture and the number of orders received by them have increased in so rapid a manner that they are again compelled to increase working capacity and space.  Their shipments are made to all parts of the United States, from ocean to ocean, and from the Gulf of Mexico to Canada, and they are now finding it necessary to establish agencies all over the world.  As stated above, Mr. GRANGER is the president and manager of the company, and is the life and spirit of the enterprise.  The company was incorporated in New York, 1908, and F. J. NELSON is the secretary and treasurer.

Although the demands made upon the time of Mr. GRANGER are manifold, he nevertheless gives a fair amount of attention to all matters of public interest in the community, and is a staunch supporter of the principles of the Democratic party, and an attendant of the Congregational church of Canandaigua, in which town he has his residence.  He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks of Geneva.

Mr. GRANGER married, June 2, 1893, Mary MICHAELIS, born in New York City, August 7, 1873.  Children:  1. Henry Calvin, born February 9, 1895, is at present at the Canandaigua high school, and will enter Yale University as soon as he has finished his preparatory studies.  2. Marian, born June 12, 1900.

 

GREEN

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 74  

GREEN, Dr. Lewis E., Richmond, was born in South Dansville, Steuben county, January 13, 1850.  His father, Philip, who was a native of Germany, came to this country when a young man, dying in 1891 at the age of 75 years.  He was a miller by trade in the old country and followed it in this country for many years.  In later life he was also a farmer, owning between 400 and 500 acres and a grist-mill.  He married Mary WOOLFARGER.  They had 10 children, of whom seven survive: 1. Frederick, in the West; Alexander, of Conesus; Dr. Lewis E.; Mary E.; William H., who lives on the homestead; Charles C., a physician in Hornellsville; and Benjamin W., of Hammondsport.  Dr. Lewis E. was educated in Rogersville Union Seminary, studied medicine with Dr. L. B. HEALY, of Cohocton, NY, attended the Medical school in Buffalo, and graduated from the Cincinnati College of Medicine and Surgery in 1874.  He practiced medicine in Hemlock one year and came to Honeoye in 1875, since which he has gained an extensive practice.  He married in 1887 Carrie E., daughter of David E. PIERPONT, and they have one son, Pierpont LEWIS.  Dr. GREEN has held the office of town clerk several terms and has been postmaster four years.

 

GREEN

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 78

  

GREEN, Isaac Baker, Richmond, was born June 29, 1837, in Rush, Monroe county.  His father, Isaiah, was born in 1802 and died in (Sept 2,) 1872.  He was a native of Half Moon, Saratoga county, and when 10 years of age came with his father, Jonathan, to Rush.  Isaiah married Sophronia BAKER, daughter of William, and they had four children: Mary Jane, deceased; Isaac B., David W., and Marcus B., deceased.  His wife died in 1870.  Isaiah was a farmer, and came to Richmond in 1855 and bought the Barton STOUT farm.  Isaac B. was educated at Lima Seminary, and married in 1871 Margery A., born in 1845, daughter of John REED and granddaughter of Wheeler REED.  They had three children: John R., born in 1872; Frank L., born in 1874; Isaac M., born in 1884.  In 1867 Mr. GREEN bought the Jesse STOUT farm, formerly a part of the BAKER farm, containing 132 acres.  He has 17 acres of hops, and a fine flock of pure blood Merino sheep.

 

GREEN   

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 299

GREEN, Miles H., Canandaigua, was born in Jerusalem, Yates county, March 14, 1834, a son of Henry GREEN, a native of Rushville, born in 1797, who moved to Canandaigua and bought a farm on the Academy tract, where he lived until his death, March 28, 1836.  He had seven children now living.  Our subject is a twin, and he and his youngest brother are the youngest of the family.  He has always made his home in this town, and was educated in the common schools and a select school in Naples.  After leaving school he took up farming, and in 1880 bought his present farm of William S. DURAND.  This is a fine place of 135 acres, and Mr. GREEN has set out about 30 acres of grapes and 20 acres of peach and apple orchard.  In politics he is an ardent Republican, but has never been an office seeker.  He married in 1856 Louisa A., daughter of William S. DURAND, of Canandaigua, and they had 6 children, four now living: Henry, bookkeeper and overseer of one department of Eastman's Kodak Works at Rochester; Frank, with the same company; Charles, a farmer of Canandaigua; and William, who lives at home.

 

GREENE

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893,  pg 74   

GREENE, Dr. Frank A., Geneva, was born in Virgil, Cortland county, December 12, 1855.  He was educated in the public schools, and resided in Ithaca until 19 years old.  He studied dentistry with Dr. E. D. CARR, of De Ruyter, Madison county, and began practicing dentistry in 1877, locating in Geneva in 1881.  October 1, 1879, he married Mary E., second daughter of Andrew and Eliza CRAWFORD, of Ithaca.  They have one daughter, Edna CROZIER.  The doctor is a member of Ark Lodge No. 33 F. & A. M.; of the Knights of Pythias; of the Seventh District Dental Society of the State of of New York; and also of the New York State Dental Society and American Dental Association.  His father, Truman P. GREENE, enlisted in Co. B, 185th N. Y. Vols., and was honorably discharged at the close of the Civil war.

 

GREENE

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 78

 

GREENE, Henry, Farmington, was born in Rochester, Monroe county, January 21, 1841, and moved with his parents to Macedon, Wayne county, in 1846. He was educated in the public schools and Macedon Academy, and for some years was a carpenter and joiner, and now a farmer.  He has been highway commissioner twelve years, collector one year, and filled a vacancy for supervisor part of a term.  December 17, 1873, he married Cynthia A., only child of Isaac L. and Sarah D. CARPENTER, at Macedon Centre.  They have had three children: Carrie E., who died at the age of 20 months; George W., and Joseph, who reside with their parents.  Mr. GREENE's father, Joseph, was born in the State of Rhode Island, on the Island of Canonicut in Jamestown, January 28, 1806, and came with his parents to Cayuga county, this State, when he was 4 years old, and resided there until 1827, when he went to Rochester.  June 2, 1831, he married Rosanna BUNKER, formerly of Ghent, Columbia county, who was born August 26, 1812.  They had five children: Sarah A., Edwin, Henry, William, and Charles A.  The ancestry of the family is English.  One, John GREENE, came to the United States, and was associated with Roger WILLIAMS in the Providence purchase in 1636.  Mrs. GREENE's father, Isaac L. CARPENTER, was born in Dutchess county, February 22, 1812, and was educated in the common schools.  November 16, 1836, he married Sarah D. CORNWELL, of Henrietta, formerly of Westchester county, and had one daughter.  The ancestry of the family is English, Welsh and French.

 

GREENLEAF 

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg. 72 - 73  

GREENLEAF, Horace D., Hopewell, was born in Lafargeville, Jefferson county, May 11, 1845, a son of John D. GREENLEAF, who was born in Guilford, Vt., December 8, 1803, and settled in Jefferson county.  His wife was Julia TRUESDALE, a native of Quebec, whose parents came from France to Quebec where they died of cholera in 1832.  Mr. GREENLEAF and wife had two sons and four daughters, all now living.  Mrs. GREENLEAF died in 1881 and Mr. GREENLEAF resides at Hall's Corners.  In early life he was a sailor on Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River.  Horace D. married, December 29, 1870, Ella F., daughter of John and Lucina DIXON, early settlers of Seneca, where both died.  Mr. and Mrs. GREENLEAF have two children: John D. and Lucy J.  Mr. GREENLEAF learned the carpenter's trade in 1863 which he followed until 1887, when he was badly injured by a fall.  In 1874 he came to Hopewell and purchased the Nathan BRUNDAGE farm, on which he has erected fine buildings at a cost of $5,000.  He has been station agent at Lewis since 1890.  He also deals in produce and coal, and has been in the mercantile business since 1888.  He is a Democrat and has been justice of the peace four years.  He is a member of Ark Lodge No. 33, F. and A. M. at Geneva, and became a Mason in 1868.

 

GREENOW

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 76 - 77  

GREENOW, Thomas, Gorham, a native of England, was born October 17, 1829, a son of David and Ann GREENOW, of England, to whom were born two sons and three daughters.  David died in 1880 and his wife in 1892.  Thomas came in 1852 to America where he worked by the month for some time and then worked by the month for some time and then worked rented land for 16 years.  In 1871 he purchased and improved 100 acres in Gorham where he has since resided.  In 1853 Mr. GREENOW married Mary A. GREENOW, a native of England, who when seven years old came to America with her parents, William and Eleanor GREENOW, who settled in Gorham and there died.  They had three daughters and five sons.  Mr. Wm. GREENOW died in 1864 and his wife in 1880.  The children of subject are: David L., of Ionia county, Michigan, who married Eunice SQUIRES and has two daughters Jessie and Olive M.; Leonia, who died in 1884; Hattie A., wife of Charles GLEW, died January 24, 1883; J. Frank, who married Emma E. BENDER, resides in Gorham.  Mr. GREENOW is a republican but has never been an aspirant to office.

 

GREGG  

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 297 - 298

GREGG, George, Bristol, was born in Bristol, May 24, 1842.  He is a son of John GREGG, born 1820, a son of George GREGG, born 1785, whose father, John GREGG, born 1755, was a native of Ireland, and the first of the family who came to America.  John GREGG was born in Bristol in 1820, and married Lucy, daughter of Isaiah CASE.  They had two children: Betsey, wife of Edward WILDER, of Canandaigua, and George.  Mr. GREGG lived on the farm owned by subject until 1881, when he went to Canandaigua, where he died in February, 1892.  He and family attended the Universalist church.  Subject of sketch was educated in Poughkeepsie Business College.  He is a farmer and hop grower, and owns 280 acres of land in Bristol, and also a residence in Canandaigua.  In 1863 he married Lovisa, born 1843, daughter of Orestes CASE.  They have had six children: Minnie L. (deceased), John B., Lutie L. (deceased), George W., Orestes J., Oliver C.  Mr. GREGG and son, John B., are members of the People's Party.  The family attends the Universalist church.  John B. was born in 1870, and educated in Canandaigua Academy, from which he graduated in 1887.  He is a member of the Farmers' Alliance, and has been secretary of that organization.  George W. was born May 15, 1876, and was educated in the Canandaigua Academy.  Orestes J. was born June 26, 1882.  Oliver C. was born May 9, 1886.

 

GREGORY  

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 375

GREGORY, Charles P., was born in the village of Naples, June 2, 1833.  He was educated in the public schools of Naples and Franklin Academy at Plattsburg.  He was clerk for his uncle in general store twelve years, manager and also purchaser for the concern six years.  February 22, 1864, he married L. Samaria NELLIS, of Naples, fomerly of Belfast, Alleghany county, NY; they have one daughter, Frances E., residing at home with her parents.  Mr. GREGORY's father, Philip, was born in Seneca in 1804.  He was a farmer by occupation, and married Emma WATKINS, of Naples.  They had five children: Matilda, Cinderella, Ann, Sarah, and Charles P.  Mrs. GREGORY's father, John B. NELLIS, was born in Herkimer county in 1807.  He was a dairy farmer, and married Samantha STANTON, and moved to Alleghany county.  They had four children: Levi, L. Samaria, John W., and Marshall.  Her father died in 1884.  His father in 1886, and his mother in 1862.  Mr. GREGORY has resided upon the farm he owns for 32 years.  He has the most perfect barn we have seen, 140 x 51 1/2 feet, aside from the straw barns.  He has two silos with system of tracks and cars to carry the feed to his very excellent dairy of Jersey cows, about fifty in number, fastened in their stalls with improved patent stanchions.  The manure is all carried out in cars on these tracks and dumped a proper distance from the buildings.  The grain when harvested is put into this barn and the threshing done at their convenience in winters.  He has 60 miles of under tile drains on this elegant farm.  One of the best farmers in the State.

 

 

GREIG

History of Ontario Co, NY & Its People, Pub. 1911, Vol. I, pg. 225 

John GREIG, a prominent resident of Canandaigua from 1801 until his death, April 9, 1858, was born at Moffat, Dumfrieshire, Scotland, August 6, 1779.  A lawyer by profession, his time was largely devoted to the management of the Western New York holdings of an English estate.  Was actively interested in the organizations of the County Agricultural Society and served as its president for many years.  His wife was Miss Clarissa CHAPIN, and with her aid he made his mansion, long the most notable private dwelling house in Western New York, a center of culture and hospitality.

 

GRIDLEY

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 80

 

GRIDLEY, Harrison, Canandaigua, was born in Cazenovia, Madison county, in 1822.  His early life was spent in Cazenovia, and he was educated at the seminary there.  His first business venture after leaving school was as clerk in a dry goods store in Elmira, where he was from 1842 to 1857.  In 1857 he came to Canandaigua, and engaged in the coal business, which he still conducts, now handling about 5,000 tons of Plymouth coal per year.  His yard is located on Niagara street, and he employs three teams and five hands.  The office is at 228 Main street, and Dr. GRIDLEY's residence is at 32 Gibson street.  Mr. GRIDLEY married in 1854 Helen A. LEWIS of Lenox, Madison county, and they are the parents of one child, H. Marietta, wife of Rev. John G. BLUE of Waukesha, Wis.

 

GRIFFIN   

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 299 - 300

GRIFFIN, Elias, West Bloomfield, was born in 1816.  His father, Wheeler GRIFFIN, was from Jefferson county, and came here just previous to the War of 1812, locating in the village, where he established a pottery, which he continued till about 1826, when he bought the farm now owned by Elias and located there.  He was a member of Captain PECK's  Company in the War of 1812.  He married Mary KLICE, who came from Maryland, and their children were: Orson, Gustavus, Elias, Charles, and Mary Ann.  Only Elias and Charles survive, the latter being a dairyman in Michigan.  Wheeler GRIFFIN was justice of the peace and assessor.  Elias spent his minority at the district schools and the academy here, working with his father on the farm.  He was Captain of the Independent Bloomfield Rifle Company at the time Governor BOUCK was executive.  He married in 1860 Adeline FITCH, whose parents were early settlers in Lima, NY.  They had two children: Preston W., born in 1861, and Belle, both living at home.  Mr. GRIFFIN has been a hop grower and has now the second largest apple orchard in the town.

 

 

GRIFFITH

History of Ontario Co, NY and Its People, Pub 1911, Vol II, pg. 461 

John GRIFFITH, a native of Ireland and probably of the ancient Welsh family of this name, came to this country when a young man and settled in the town of Phelps, Ontario county, New York, where he followed farming.  He became a representative and successful citizen.  He married Polly HOBBS.  In religion he was a Methodist, in politics a republican.  Children:  Eveline, Lizzie Ann, Jane, Eliza, Joseph, John Watson, Jane, Louise.

     ( II ) John Watson, son of John Griffith, was born in Phelps, died there in 1897.  He married Charlotte MALETTE, who died in 1894, daughter of Isaac MALETTE.  He was also a farmer in Phelps.  Children, born in Phelps:  Hon. Frederick W., resides at Palmyra, New York, a state senator from his district; John C.; James M.; Willie W.; Willie W.; Mary E., married Carlton T. CHAPMAN; Helena May, married Harry WING, of Palmyra; Frank Allyn, mentioned below.

     ( III ) Frank Allyn, son of John Watson GRIFFITH, was born in Phelps, August 17, 1873, and was educated in the public schools of his native town and of Clifton Springs, New York.  He commenced his business career as shipping clerk in the office of the Clifton Springs Manufacturing Company.  After two years he returned, in 1893, to his native town and since then has followed farming there.  In politics he is republican, in religion a Methodist.

He married, January 16, 1894, Christine BENNCKENSTEIN, born in New York City, daughter of Edward BENNCKENSTEIN, of New York City.  Children:  Charlotte, born March 12, 1895; Allyn Edward, born January 1, 1898; Mary Elizabeth, born July 31, 1900.

 

 

GROVE

History of Ontario Co.& Its People, Pub. 1911, Vol. II, pg. 79 - 80

Dr. Chauncey W. GROVE, a physician and surgeon in Geneva, Ontario county, New York, and throughout that section is descended from an old family of Germany. The family name was originally spelled VON GRAFFE, and this by successive changes has finally developed into GROVE. From the earliest times the family has adhered to the Protestant denomination, and it was during the very early days of the settlement of the colonies that the first members came to this country and made their homes here.

Jacob GROVE, grandfather of Dr. Chauncey W. GROVE, was on of the pioneers in the settlement of Pennsylvania.

Jay C., son of Jacob GROVE, was born in Pennsylvania, August 8, 1858, and resides in Erie, Pennsylvania, at the present time. He is the agent for the United States Steel Corporation, operating a system of railways. He married Zettirah, daughter of William H. FRY.

Dr. Chanucy W. GROVE, son of Jay C. and Zettirah (FRY) GROVE, was born in Fredonia, Pennsylvania, December 15, 1879. His elementary education was obtained in the public schools of Pennsylvania, and he was graduated with honor from the Erie high school. His next step was to enter the University of Buffalo in 1900, and he was graduated from the institution in 1904, with a degree of Doctor of Medicine. He then spent one year as the house physician in the Erie County Hospital, of Buffalo, and in July 1905, established himself as a physician and surgeon in Geneva, Ontario County, New York. He is affiliated with the following organizations: Masons, Royal Arch Masons and Knights Templar; Benevolent and Protective order of Elks; Omega Upsilon Phi; Geneva Medical Society; Ontario County Medical Society; New York State Medical Society; American Medical Association. 

Dr. Grove married June 14, 1905, Kathryn, born, in Phelps, Ontario County, New York, November 12, 1884, a daughter of Samuel NAGEL, a prominent contractor of Geneva.

 

GULVIN

History of Ontario Co., NY, Pub 1911, vol. 2, pg 75-76 

Reuben H. GULVIN, chief of the fire department of Geneva, Ontario County, New York, is a fine example of a self-made man, in the truest sense of the word, rising entirely by his own unaided efforts from a position of dependence in England to that of the proprietor of the finest jewelry store in Geneva and its vicinity, and to a foremost position in the community in which he resides.  

Reuben H. GULVIN was born in Kent, England, November 20, 1869, son of George GULVIN, who is still living in his native country, and is considered an expert in the manipulation of a threshing machine and in the thatching of houses. The mother of Mr. GULVIN died when he was but six years of age, and he has one brother, who lives in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and who came to this country through the assistance of Reuben H. GULVIN. 

Mr. GULVIN�S school education was a very limited one, but he as supplemented it amply by study in later years, utilizing all his spare time for this purpose, and he is of a keenly observant nature, thus making up for his lack of advantages in his early youth.  At the age of nine years he was obliged to spend all the time not taken up with school and its tasks in following the threshing machine, making the wimble or straw rope, which is termed straw bands in England.  When he was eleven years of age he was compelled to leave school altogether and devote his entire time to this business, continuing in it until he had attained an age of 18 years.  He then continued faithfully at his labors until one Saturday evening, when he decided that the time had come for him to attempt to better his condition.  The following morning, Sunday, he borrowed sufficient money to serve his purpose and left his native town in order to sail for America.  After a voyage of eleven days he was landed in New York City, and immediately left for Petersborough, Canada.  He stayed there but three weeks and then came to Geneva, New York, where he has resided since that time. 

For three years he worked as a farm hand, but his ambition would not allow him to remain satisfied with this class of work. The second winter he did chores as an equivalent for his board, and became a regular attendant at the San Hill district school.  At the end of three years he entered the employ  of Dr. COVERT, driving for him and taking care of the horses for two years.  By this time, he was entering his 24th year, and he determined to learn a trade.  He accordingly formed a connection with Edwin HARRIS to learn the jewelry and watch-making business, commencing with a salary of three dollars per week.  His spare time he employed in doing miscellaneous chores and in this manner earned sufficient money to pay his board.  Six years passed in this manner, and the connection was severed by the death of Mr. HARRIS.  Mrs. HARRIS, the widow, engaged the services of Mr. GULVIN as a manager of the business for her, and at the end of one year he borrowed a sufficient sum of money to enable him to purchase the business outright.  His able conduct of it was put it in a very flourishing condition, and at the end of three years he increased his business capacity by borrowing sufficient funds for the Geneva National Bank to purchase the business of M. C. HAIGHT, who had been the pioneer jeweler of Geneva.  The combination of these two interests has given Mr. GULVIN the finest jewelry store in Geneva and that section of the country, and his customers come from far and wide.  He is thoroughly conversant with all the details of his business and energetic in all his commercial transactions.  Honorable and high-minded as he is in all phases of life, he has earned and deserves the confidence of all with whom he has business or private dealings.  He constantly carries a large stock and his store is fitted up with an artistic beauty which is not often met with.  His reliable business methods make it a foregone conclusion that his trade must steadily increase, and he has five people in his employ who are kept busy continually. 

In addition to these interests Mr. GULVIN is active in all matters concerning the town in which he resides.  As above stated, he is a member of the fire department; he has participated actively in the work of the department for at least twenty years, having passed the civil service examination with a high rate of standing.  His political support is given to the republican party and while he as never held public office, he has always been keenly alive to the events and interests in his town, state and country.  He is a member of the Methodist church and his fraternal affiliations are of a high order.  For many years he has been connected with Free masonry, having held offices in the Blue Lodge, and in  all the intermediate lodge grades up to and including the Shrine; he is a charter member of Lodge No. 1054, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and served as its treasurer for a number of years; at present he is a member of the house committee, also a member of the Maccabees.  For some years, he was a member of the cemetery commission.

 

GUNNISON

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 77  

 

GUNNISON, Charles C., Farmington, was born in Milwaukee, Wis., June 20, 1856.  He was educated in the public schools and spent two years at Canandaigua Academy.  He is a wholesale produce dealer and commission merchant, as well as a farmer, at Merteasia.  In April, 1892, he married Ellen J., second daughter of Joseph P. and Ellen A. HATHAWAY, of Farmington, one of a family whose ancestors settled in the town in the 17th century.  Henry, father of Charles C. GUNNISON, was born in Claremont, NH, about 1826, and came to this State with his parents when young.  He married Esther L. SMITH of Farmington, and they had four children: Lonie, who died in infancy; Charles C., Florence and Ellen V. S., who married Dr. Arthur L. BENEDICT, now a physician in Buffalo.  Mr. GUNNISON's home was built in 1800; the saw mill in 1792; and the grist-mill in 1794, by his mother's people.

 

GUNNISON   

History of Ontario Co, NY, Conover & Aldrich, pub 1893, pg 298 - 299

GUNNISON, George L., Canandaigua, was born on his present farm February 14, 1830.  The ancestry of this family is Swedish.  The grandfather, Nathaniel, was a native of New Hampshire, and was the father of six children, all now deceased.  Levi B., the father of George, was born in Goshen, Sullivan county, NH, February 22, 1800, where he lived until 16 years of age.  In 1816 he came to Ontario county, spending one year in Farmington, and then returned to New Hampshire where he remained a year, and then came to Canandaigua.  He bought different farms in this town, owning at one time over 200 acres.  He was always a leading spirit in the Methodist church, and died December 11, 1883.  He married in 1827 Rhoda H. HURD, of Lempster, NH, and they had 7 children, four now living: John O., a retired farmer of Jackson, Mich.; Pliny H., a retired farmer of North Freedom, Sauk county, Wis.; Frances L., a general merchant of Marengo, Calhoun county, Mich.; and George L.  Mrs. GUNNISON, mother of our subject, still lives in her 86th year.  George L. was educated in Canandaigua Academy, and assisted on his father's farm until of age, then took up his residence on the farm north where he lived three years.  He spent two years on the TIFFANY farm, and in April, 1856, bought 100 acres adjoining the old homestead on the north side, where he lived until 1865, returning and spending three years on the homestead, and then lived 8 years in Canandaigua Village, to give his children better school facilities.  In 1876 he settled on the old homestead where he has ever since lived.  Mr. GUNNISON is a republican, but has never been an aspirant for public office.  He is a member and officer of the Methodist church.  December 15, 1853, he married Jane Alvira, daughter of Edmund TIFFANY, and they have three sons: Frank N., shipping clerk in the New York Central freight office at Canandaigua; Alfred M., who conducts the homestead farm; and George H., who is fitting for a teacher.

 

 

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