Pension Record of Winant VanDenbergh

Rensselaer Co. Pension Rolls of 1835

    Book Number  6,  Volume Number  4,  Page  Number  85

 

Welcome to Ontario County, NY, History and Genealogy! 
If you would like to add or to link Ontario County data to this site please contact Dianne Thomas .       Copyright resides with the contributor.

 

Return to Home Page                        Return to Military Index Page

contributed by Ron Hanley

Pictures of  VanDenburgh  Dedication

 

Winant C. VanDenbergh

listed in the 1840 Victor, NY census as a Pensioner

Private & sergeant

Annual Allowance: 33.83

Sums Received 101.49

Description of service  New York Militia

When placed on the pension roll: January 18, 1834

Commencement of pension  March 4, 1831

Age: 74  

[buried in Victor Cemetery, Victor, NY]

 
 
 
  I'll make an attempt to transcribe as best as I can read the following:
 
  Declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress of June 7, 1832:
  Form for State Troops     State of New York, County of Rensselaer
 
On this Sixth day of August  personally appeared in open Court before me, Herman Knickerbacker  First Judge of Common Pleas of said
Court.  Wynant C. VanDenbergh a resident of  Hoosick, county of Rensselaer, and State of New York, aged seventy three years, who first
being duly sworn according to law, doth, on his oath make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress
passed June 7, 1832.
 
It them goes on to state his enlistment date and all the places he served. These papers were sent to me via the NARA and are his papers
filed under  S 32032.  Herman VanVeghten signed as witness.
 
The papers go on to reveal the following:
State of New York, Rensselaer County, Wynant C. VanDenbergh of Hoosick, County of Rensselaer, State of New York, in order to obtain a
Pension under the act of Congress of June 7th, 1832, who being first duly sworn upon his oath, makes this his additional affidavit any days
that by reason of old age and the consequent loss of memory as he cannot swear positively as to the precise length of his service, but according
to the best of his recollection he served not less than the periods mentioned below and in the following grades, that he, this deponent,
entered the service of the United States, in the war of the revolution about the middle of May 1777, as a private, Schaghticoke, Rensselaer
Co., NY,  in a company of militia commanded by Jacob Yates Captain, John Bradt, Lieutenant, and Richard Davies, Ensign, in a regiment commanded by Col. Peter Yates and John Groesbeck, Major, and marched to Fort Edward and assisted in removing the artillery of the army from Fort Edward to Stillwater, and thence to Half Moon in Saratoga County, was gone at least this time no less than two weeks, and then came home.
 
That the first part of October 1777, the deponent was again called out by the last mentioned officers and marched to Stillwater, Saratoga Co., New York, and joined the army under the command of General Gates, and was in the first battle at the capture of Burgoyne. That immediately after the surrender of Burgoyne, that this deponent was in service three weeks , that this deponent was dismissed and went home.
 
That in the beginning of 1778 this deponent was again called out, and in the month of June, and marched to Palmertown, Saratoga Co., under
Captain Jacob Yates, Richard Davenport Ensign and John Bradt Lieutenant, Peter Yates Colonel, and John Groesbeck, Major, and was in active
service one month guarding the country from the enemy and was then discharged and went home.
 
That in the Fall of this same year  1778, and in the beginning of October this deponent was called out and marched under the command of the last mentioned officers to a place called Saratoga, and was there in actual service one month employed in guarding that place and guarding the country.
 
That in the Fall of 1778 this deponent, thinks about the middle of November he was again called out and marched to Fort Edward. John Van
Rensselaer, was the Lieutenant Colonel that commanded there, and served as a Sergeant under Captain Yates. Was in actual service at this time no
less than one month, and this deponent believes five weeks was then discharged and went home, was employed at this time in guarding Fort Edward.
 
That in the fore part of May in 1779 this deponent was again called out by the same officers, Capt. Yates and Lieutenant Colonel Van Rensselaer, and marched to Ticonderoga on Lake Champlain, was there a short time and then marched to Crown Point, was in actual service at this time one month and was as a Sergeant, was employed in scouting and guarding those places hard to read two words that follow.
 
That in the following year 1780 he was again called out twice, the first time in June, and marched to Fort Ann and Lake George under the command of Capt. Yates. Was employed in scouting parties and guarding the country. Served as a Sergeant and was in actual service two weeks.
 
The second time in this year that this deponent was called out was in the fore part of the fall, and marched to Fort Edward and Whitehall under the command of Capt. Yates. Served as a Sergeant and at this time was in actual service two weeks, employed in watching the enemy and guarding the country.
 
That in 1781 this deponent was called out and served under Capt. Yates and Major Groesbeck. In May marched to Palmertown to guard that place and the adjoining country. Was in actual service at this time and served as a Sergeant three weeks. Was then discharged and went home.
 
That in the following October this deponent entered the service again and was called out by Capt Yates, John Van Antwerp Ensign and marched to Palmertown, Saratoga County, and was employed in helping a garrison at that place and in scouting the country. Was employed as a Sergeant and was in actual service at this time two weeks and was then discharged and went home.
 
That in the following year 1782, and in the fore part of the summer this deponent was again called out under Captain Yates and marched to Otsego under the command of General Clinton in pursuit of the hostile Indians, was in actual service at this time three weeks when he was discharged and went home.
 
That in the fall of this same year, this deponent was again called by Capt. Yates and John Van Antwerp, Ensign, and the last of September or the first of October marched to unreadable Saratoga County, New York.  Went out on a scouting party to watch the enemy and was in actual service at this time as a Sergeant one week. Was then discharged and went home.
 
And this deponent further says that he was born in 1760, Albany County, New York, lived there about ten years, then moved to Schaghticoke, Rensselaer Co., New York, where he resided about twelve years, when he moved to Cambridge, Washington Co., New York. Hoosick,
Rensselaer Co., New York where he still resides, has a record of his age, never received a written discharge from the service, and this deponent further says that during the several periods of service above mentioned he was not employed in any civil pursuit.
 
Sworn before me on this 12th day of July 1833, H. Knickerbacker, First Judge of Rensselaer County.
 
A letter written to Mrs. George S. Edmonds, of Albany, September 7, 1933, by the Assistant to Administrator, states that the Certificate Number 24602, Issued January 18, 1834 at a rate of $33.83 per annum. This letter further states he was living in Hoosick, Rensselaer Co. in August 1832, and was then reported to be living in Canandaigua in 1844.

[Note: name was spelled Wynant and surname was also misspelled.]

 

Created by Dianne Thomas  

These electronic pages may be printed as a link or for personal use, but is NOT to be reproduced
in any format for profit or presentation by ANY other organization or persons.

Copyright  2009 - 2015

                                          [NY History and Genealogy]