Ontario County in the Rebellion

History of Ontario County, NY  published 1893, pgs 136 - 154

  CHAPTER XII 

kindly transcribed by Deborah Spencer

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ONTARIO COUNTY IN THE REBELLION---1861-1865 

GROWING out of the agitation of the slavery question there became engendered a feeling of bitter hostility between the people of the North and the South many years before the actual outbreak of the War of the Rebellion.  In November, 1860, Abraham LINCOLN was elected to the presidency, and the news of that election was received by the southern people with great indignation and the violent expression of treasonable sentiments.  On the 20th of December South Carolina passed an ordinance of secession, and less than a week afterward seized upon certain forts and public proprieties of the government and raised over them the palmetto flag.  Still later, on the 9th of January, 1861, the rebel batteries in Charleston harbor fired upon the Star of the West, a merchant steamer in the government employ, which had been sent with supplies and troops for the relief of Major ANDERSON. 

The example set by South Carolina was soon afterward followed by other Southern States, and the final result was that the whole country became involved in a civil war which continued for more than four years, and cost the State of New York more than $150,000,000, and more than 50,000 men. 

The war of 1861-5 was actually begun by the firing upon Fort Sumter at half-past four o'clock on the morning of the 12th of April 1861.  The news of the bombardment was received at the capital on the 14th, and on the following day the president issued a proclamation calling upon the militia of the several States to the number of 75,000 men to suppress the treasonable combinations and to enforce the law.  To the State of New York was assigned the quota of seventeen regiments, or an aggregate force of 13,280 men.  Governor Edwin D. MORGAN and other officials, who comprised the State Military Board, took immediate action and issued orders for the available organized militia to prepare to march.  Military depots were established at Albany, New York and Elmira, with branches in other prominent cities and needed supplies and equipments were provided with all possible dispatch. 

The efforts of the governor and other officials were ably and heartily seconded by the Legislature, which was then in session, the senator from Ontario county being Thomas HILLHOUSE, while the respective assembly districts were represented by Perez H. FIELD and Stephen H. AINSWORTH.  In this connection it is proper to mention the names of the senators and assemblymen who served in those respective capacities during the other years of the war.  In the fall of 1861 Charles J. FOLGER was elected senator and continued in that capacity throughout the war.  In 1862 the Ontario county assemblymen were David PICKET and Francis O. MASON; in 1863, Perez H. FIELD and Lanson DEWEY, who also were re-elected and served during the legislative session of 1864.  In 1865 Volney EDGERTON and Edward BRUNSON were members of assembly from this county. 

It would be extremely difficult, if not almost wholly impossible, to state the number of men furnished by Ontario county in all branches of the service during the period of the war.  However, we may state in a general way that representatives of Ontario county served in twenty-nine different military organizations of the State and in each of these was at least a considerable contingent.  

In the Cavalry service men from the county were in the 8th, 9th, 15th, 24th, First Mounted Rifles, and the First Veteran.  

In the Artillery the county was represented by men in the First, Fourth, Ninth, Eleventh, Thirteenth and Sixteenth regiments.  In the regiments of Engineers men from the county were in the First, Fifteenth (new) and Fiftieth.  The county was also represented in the following Infantry regiments, viz: 18th, 27th, 28th, 33rd, 38th, 85th, 100th, 126th, 148th, 154th, 160th, 179th, 188th, 194th.

It is the purpose of the present chapter to make some reference to each of the several regiments in which were men from Ontario county; but inasmuch as each of these commands has had its history previously written, many of them at length and in great detail, it will be unnecessary in this work to repeat what is already extant, and our record may therefore be very much condensed, and at the same time furnish to the reader all the facts desirable to be known in connection with the services of each command. 

The Regiment of Infantry, otherwise known as the New York Rifles, was the first organization that numbered in its ranks men from this county.  Company G, which was recruited at Canandaigua was organized by the election of Henry FAUROT as captain; James H. MORGAN, first lieutenant, and William H. ELLIS, jr., ensign.  The regiment, which was under command of Colonel William A. JACKSON, was accepted by the State and mustered into service on May 13, 1861.  It was organized at Albany and mustered into service May 17, 1861, for two years.  At the expiration of the term the three years' men were transferred to the 121st New York Volunteers. 

The companies comprising the 18th were recruited mainly as follows; A and E at Schenectady; B, F, H and I at Albany and its vicinity; C at Fishkill; D (Walkill Guards) at Middletown and in Sullivan county; G at Canandaigua, and K at Ogdensburg.  On June 19 the regiment left the State, served for a time at Washington, D. C., and from July 13 in the Second Brigade, Fifth Division, Army N. E. Virginia.  Later on it served in Franklin's and Newton's Brigade in the Army of the Potomac, with which army, though variously assigned, it continued its service until May 28, 1863, when it was honorably discharged and mustered out at Albany. 

During the period of its service the 18th lost an aggregate of seventy-five, being five officers and seventy enlisted men, three of the latter dying in the hands of the enemy. 

Battles of the 18th.--1861:  Braddock Road, Va., July 16; Fairfax Station, July 17; Blackburn's Ford, July 18; Bull Run, July 21; Munson's Hill, August 28 and November 16; Springfield Station, December 4, 1862; Union Mills, March 12; West Point, May 7; Seven Days Battle, June 25 to July 2; Gaines Mills, June 27; Garnett's and Golding's Farms, June 28; Glendale, June 30; Malvern Hill, July 1; Burke's Station, August 28; Crampton Pass, September 14; Antietam, September 17; Fredericksburg, December 11-15, 1863; Franklin's Crossing, April 29 and May 2; Marye's Heights and Salem Church, May 3-4. 

The 27th Regiment was organized and accepted by the State May 21, 1861, and mustered into the service at Elmira in the early part of July, to serve for two years.  The companies of the 27th were recruited in Southern and Western New York, a part of the Company G being from Ontario county.  The regiment left the State July 10, 1861, in command of Henry W. SLOCUM, served the full term of its enlistment and was mustered out of service May 31, 1863 at Elmira.  During its service the 27th lost, from all causes, a total of 146 men.  The battles in which it participated were as follows: 1861; Bull Run, July 21; Pohick Church, October 4.  1862: West Point, May 7; near Mechanicsville, May 22, and June 1; Seven Days Battle, June 25 to July 2; Gaines Mills, June 27; Garnett's and Golding's Farms, June 28; Glendale, June 30; Malvern Hill, July 1; Crampton Pass, September 14; Antietam, September 17; Fredericksburg, December 11-15.  1863: Franklin's Crossing, April 29 to May 2; Marye's Heights and Salem Church, May 3-4. 

The 28th Regiment of Infantry, otherwise known as the "Niagara Rifles" and the "Scott Life Guard," was recruited principally in the western part of the State, companies A, B, C and K, being raised at Lockport; D at Medina; E at Canandaigua; F at Batavia; G at Albion; H at Monticello; and I at Niagara Falls.  The Ontario county company was commanded by Theodore FITZGERALD, captain; J. J. WHITNEY, first lieutenant, and Harry PADDLEFORD, ensign.  When mustered in the regiment was in command of Colonel Dudley CONNOLLY, and when mustered out was in command of Colonel Edwin F. BROWN.  The 28th war organized at Albany, and mustered into service for two years, May 22, 1861.  It left the State June 25, serving for a time at Washington, thence in Butterfield's Brigade, Keim's Division, District of Pennsylvania, and after October 15 in Banks's Division, Army of the Potomac.  Later on it served with the Army of Virginia and the Army of the Potomac until mustered out at Albany, June 2, 1863.  The 28th during its service lost an aggregate of 115 officers and men.  The engagements in which it took part were as follows: 1861: Near Martinsburg, July 11; in Virginia, opposite Point of Rocks, August 5; Berlin, September 18.  1862: Winchester, March 23; Monteveido, March 27; near Columbia Furnace, April 15; near Harrisonburg, April 24; operations in Shenandoah Valley, May 23-25; Front Royal, May 23; Middletown, May 24; Newtown, May 24; Winchester, May 25; Bunker Hill, May 25; near Luray, June 30; Rappahannock, July 25; Cedar Mountain, August 9; General Pope's campaign, August 16 to September 2; Rappahannock Station, August 23; Sulphur Springs, August 23-24; Antietam, September 17.  1863: Chancellorsville, May 1-3. 

The 33rd Regiment of Infantry, which afterward became known as the "Ontario Regiment," Col. Robert F. TAYLOR commanding, was organized at Elmira, and mustered into the United States service July 3, 1861, for two years, to date from May 22, 1861, at which time the regiment was accepted by the State.  To the numerical strength of the 33rd the county contributed nearly three companies, one from Canandaigua, under Capt. John R. CUTLER, and the others from Geneva, commanded by Captain WALKER and Captain WATERFORD, respectively.  However, the most recognized military authority in the State places the organization of the companies of the 33rd as follows: A and K at Seneca Falls; B at Palmyra; C (Waterloo Wright Guards) at Waterloo; D at Canandaigua; E at Geneseo; F at Nunda; G (Richmond Guards) at Buffalo; H at Geneva; I (Keuka Rifles) at Penn Yan. 

The 33rd broke camp at Elmira, July 8, 1861, and proceeded at once to Washington, where it performed service for some time.  On August 4 it was attached to W. F. SMITH's Brigade, and on September 25 was transferred to Stephen's Brigade, Smith's Division, Army of the Potomac.  In March, 1862, it formed a part of the Fourth Corps and in May following was attached to the Sixth Corps.  The appended list will give the reader an idea of the service performed by the 33rd, in addition to which we may say that it lost an aggregate of 152 men from all causes.  On June 2, 1863, still under command of Colonel TAYLOR, the regiment was honorably discharged and mustered out of service at Geneva.

The engagements in which the 33rd participated were as follows:  1861, near Chain Bridge, July 25; near Lewinsville, September 25; Big Chestnut, October 13.  1862, Watts's and Young's Mills, April 4; siege of Yorktown, April 5 to May 4; near Lee's Mills, April 5; Lee's Mills, April 8 and 16; before Yorktown, April 26; near Lee's Mills, April 28; Williamsburg, May 5; Mechanicsburg, May 24; Golding's Farm, June 5; Seven Days Battle, June 25 to July 2; Garnett's Farm, June 27; Garnett's and Golding's Farms, June 28; Savage Station, June 29; White Oak Swamp, June 30; Malvern Hill, July 1; Harrison's Landing, July 3; Jefferson Pass, September 13; Crampton Pass, September 14; Antietam, September 17; Fredericksburg, December 11-15.  1863, Marye's Heights and Salem Church, May 3-4; Gettsburg, detachment, July 1-3; Fairfield, July 5; Antietam and Marsh Run, July 7; Williamsport, July 14. 

The 38th Regiment of Infantry, otherwise known as the "Second Scott's Life-Guard," was organized in the city of New York for two years, June 3 and 8, 1861.  Its colonel was J. H. Hobart WARD.  The companies were recruited as follows: A, B, C, D and F in New York city; E in Westchester county; G in Westchester and Dutchess counties; H at Geneva; I at Horseheads, and K at Elizabethtown.  The Geneva company was commanded by Captain W. H. BAIRD. 

The 38th proceeded to Washington June 19, 1861, and became a part of the Army of the Potomac.  In December, 1862, the regiment was consolidated into six companies, to which was added four consolidated companies of the 55th Infantry, which completed the regiment.  On June 23, 1863, Col. Augustus FUNK was authorized to reorganize the regiment, but this he did not succeed in doing, and the enlisted men were transferred to the 17th Veteran Volunteers.  The 38th was honorably discharged and mustered out, under Col. James C. STRONG, June 22, 1863, at New York city.  During its service the 38th lost a total of six officers and 115 enlisted men, but the following list of engagements will furnish a more comprehensive idea of the services of the regiment.  1861, Fairfax C. H., July 17; Bull Run, July 21; near Munson's Hill, August 18.  1862, siege of Yorktown, April 5 to May 4; Williamsburg, May 5; Fair Oaks, May 31 to June 1; Seven Days Battle, June 25 to July 2; Jourdan's Ford, June 29; Glendale, June 30; Malvern Hill, July 1; General POPE's Campaign, August 26 to September 2; Centerville, August 28; Groveton, August 29; Bull Run, August 30; Chantilly, September 1; Fredericksburg, December 11-15.  1863, Chancellorsville, May 1-3. 

The 85th Regiment, (Veteran).--This command was organized November 7, 1861, and was the first regiment in which were Ontario county men that was mustered into service for three years.  Its first commander was Col. Uriah DAVIS, under whom the regiment was mustered into service between August and December, 1861.  The Ontario county contribution to the 85th comprised two companies, B, which was credited to Canandaigua, and G, which was recruited principally at Geneva.  William W. CLARK, of Naples, practically organized Company B. and was chosen its captain, C. S. ALDRICH and Amos BRUNSON being respectively first and second lieutenants.  Company G was raised in and about Geneva by John RAINES, who was made its captain, with George W. MUNGER and Thomas ALSOP first and second lieutenants. 

The other companies comprising the 85th were recruited principally as follows; A at Olean; C at Friendship; D at Little Genesee; E at Granger; F at Black Creek and Friendship; H at Wellsville; I at Richburgh; and K at Hinsdale.  The regiment left the State December 3, 1861, and was attached to the Army of the Potomac in the Third Brigade and Case's Division. 

In March, 1863, it was attached to the department of the South.  During the years 1862 and ' 63, the services of the 85th were not specially severe, its greatest losses being at Fair Oaks in the latter part of May and the early part of June, 1862.  However, on April 20, 1864, at Plymouth, NC, the regiment lost eleven men killed, and the whole command surrendered to the enemy, together with the entire brigade.  During the period of its service the 85th lost an aggregate of 378 men, of whom 245 enlisted men died in rebel prisons.  The engagements in which the regiment participated were as follows: 1862, siege of Yorktown, April 17 to May 4; Lee's Mills, April 28; Williamsburg, May 5; Seven Pines, May 24; Fair Oaks, May 30, May 31, and June 1; New Market Road, June 8; Fair Oaks, June 24-25; Seven Days Battle, June 25 to July 2; Malvern Hill, July 1; Carter's Mill, July 2; Franklin, October 31; Tuni, November 18; Exp. from New Berne to Goldsboro, NC, December 11-20; Kinston, December 14; White Hall, December 16; Goldsboro, December 17; Williamston, December 27.  1863, New Berne, March 14; Nixouton, April 16; Blont's Creek, April 9; Little Washington, April 19-20; Free Bridge, July 6; Williamstown, July 27; Chowan, July 28.  1864, Harvelsville, January 20; Plymouth, April 17-20. 

The 98th Regiment of Infantry, a veteran organization, was organized at Albany in the early part of 1862.  The command was otherwise known as the "Malone and Lyons Regiment," the "Wayne County Regiment," and "Franklin's Own."  Companies A, B, C and E were principally recruited as Malone; D and G at Bangor; H at Fort Covington, and F, K and I at Lyons.  In the companies last named was a fair contingent of Ontario county men.  However, the 34th Regiment of militia formed the nucleus of the command, which contained, also, a few St. Regis Indians. 

The 98th was mustered into service from the 1st to the 6th of February, 1862, and under Col. William DUTTON left for the front and was attached to Palmer's Brigade, Casey's Division, Fourth Corps of the Army of the Potomac.  Its battles began with the siege of Yorktown in April, and closed with the fall of Petersburg, April 2, 1865.  Its most serious losses were at Fair Oaks, Swift Creek, Cold Harbor, the operations before Petersburg and Richmond, the assault on Petersburg, and the battle at Chaffin's Farm.  During the period of its service the regiment lost eight officers and 230 enlisted men.  It was honorably discharged and mustered out under Col. William KREUTZER, August 31, 1865, at Richmond, Va.  The engagements in which the 98th took part were as follows: 1862, siege of Yorktown, April 16-May 4; Lee's Mills, April 28; Williamsburg, May 5; Bottom's Bridge, May 21-22; Savage Station, May 24; Fair Oaks, May 31; June 1, and June 24-25; Seven Days Battle, June 25-July 2; White Oak Swamp Bridge, June 30; Malvern Hill, July 1; Carter's Hill, July 2. 1864, operations before Petersburg and Richmond, May 5-31; Port Walthall and Chester Station, May 6-7; Swift Creek, May 9-10; Proctor's Creek, May 12; Drury's Bluff, May 14-16; Bermuda Hundred, May 18-26; Cold Harbor, June 1-12; (First Assault, June 1; Cold Harbor, June 2; Second Assault, June 3;) before Petersburg and Richmond, June 15 and April 2, 1865; Petersburg Assault, June 15-19, 1865; Chaffin's Farm, September 29, October 1; Fair Oaks, October 27-29, 1864; Fall of Petersburg, April 2, 1865. 

The 100th Regiment of Infantry (Veteran) was organized during the fall and winter months of 1861 under the supervision of General G. A. SCROGGS, and its companies were mustered into service by detachments as rapidly as they were recruited.  James M. BROWN was made colonel of the regiment, and with the command left for the front March 10, 1862.  The Ontario county contingent was mainly in Company B, the recruits being from the town of Victor.  The service of the 100th began with the siege of Yorktown in April, 1862, and continued throughout the war, ending with the fall of Petersburg and the final surrender at Appomattox.  Its severest losses were at Fair Oaks, Va., Battery Wagner, SC, the operations against Petersburg and Richmond, the battle at Strawberry Plains, and in the final Appomattox campaign.  Its total losses were thirteen officers and 384 enlisted men.  The regiment was mustered out of service at Richmond, Va., August 28, 1865. 

The 102nd Regiment, the "Van Buren Light Infantry," a veteran organization, was organized early in 1862, at a time when the government was seriously in need of men.  The Ontario county contribution to the regiment was exceedingly small, being a few recruits enlisted by Captain M. E. CORNELL, and his brothers George and Stephen, and obtained in the western part of the county.  The regiment was mustered into service between November, 1861, and April, 1862, and was mustered out at Alexandria, Va., July 21, 1865.   

The 126th Regiment was raised by Col. Elikim SHERRILL, who received authority therefor June 15, 1862.  It was to have been recruited in Ontario, Washington and Yates counties, but instead of Washington, Seneca county appears to have been utilized.  The regiment was organized at Geneva and there mustered into service for three years August 22, 1862.  On December 25, 1864, it was consolidated into a battalion of five companies, A to E, and on June 2, 1865, the men not mustered out with the regiment were transferred to the 4th New York Artillery.  Glancing over the records, we discover that companies A and B were recruited in Yates county; C and I in Seneca county; D, H and K wholly in Ontario county; E at Geneva and Rushville; F in Ontario and Seneca counties; and G in Ontario, Seneca and Yates. 

As a stimulus to hasten the raising of this regiment, a reward of $200 was offered for the first company recruited in Ontario county.  D gained the prize, the money being paid by H. B. GIBSON, of Canandaigua.  The first officers of this company were Philo D. PHILLIPS, captain; Charles A. RICHARDSON, first lieutenant, and Spencer F. LINCOLN, second lieutenant.  E, the Geneva and Rushville company, was under command of Captain Henry D. KIPP, and George E. PRITCHETT and John B. BROUGH, first and second lieutenants respectively.  Company F, which was raised in this county and Seneca, was under Isaac SHIMER, captain, Ira MUNSON and Ten Eyck MUNSON as first and second lieutenants.  Company G was commanded by Captain John J. AIKENS; first lieutenant Frederick STEWART and second lieutenant Sanford H. PLATT.  The towns of Phelps and Manchester furnished the men for Company H, the first officers of which were Orin J. HERENDEEN, captain; George N. REDFIELD, first lieutenant and Alfred R. CLAPP, second lieutenant.  The officers of Company K were, captain, Charles M. WHEELER; first lieutenant, H. Clay LAWRENCE, and second lieutenant, Isaac A. SEAMANS.  This company was raised principally in Canandaigua and Naples. 

The 126th proceeded to the front during the latter part of August, 1862, where it served in the Middle Department of the Army of Virginia.  The most notable event in connection with its whole service took place at the siege of Harper's Ferry, so called, on which occasion the entire regiment, together with 11,000 other Union troops, surrendered to the enemy.  In justice, however, to the 126th it must be said that this surrender or capture, for it amounted to the same, was in no manner attributable to the fault of the regiment, but rather to the weak and ill-advised action of the commanding officers of the army.  Notwithstanding this the whole force was charged with cowardly conduct, a stigma which was not removed until after the men were released from their parole.  By reference to the appended list of battles in which the regiment took part it will be seen that the men fully removed the characterization previously applied to them, and demonstrated conclusively that they were as good and true fighters as ever faced an enemy.  After being paroled the regiment was ordered to Camp Douglas, at Chicago, where it remained two months, then being exchanged and at once proceeded to the defenses of Washington, at Arlington Heights.  Later on it formed a part of the 22nd, and still later of the 2nd Army Corps.  At the expiration of the term of enlistment the regiment was honorably discharged and mustered out June 3, 1865, at Washington, DC, then being under command of Col. J. Smith BROWN. 

During the period of its service the 126th lost a total of seventeen officers and 259 enlisted men.  The engagements in which it participated were as follows: 1862, siege of Harper's Ferry, September 12-15; Maryland Heights, September 12-13; Bolivar Heights, September 15.  1863, Gettysburg, July 1-3; Auburn, October 14; Bristoe, October 14; Mitchell's Ford, October 15-16; Mine Run campaign, November 26-December 2; Robertson's Tavern, November 27.  1864, Morton's Ford, February 6; Wilderness,   M  5-7; Spottsylvania; C. H., May 8-21; Po River, May 9-10; Salient, May 12; Landron House, May 18; North Anna, May 22-26; Tolopotomoy, May 27-31; Cold Harbor, June 1-12; before Petersburg, June 15, April 2, 1865; assault of Petersburg, 15-19; Weldon R. R., June 21-23; Deep Bottom, July 27-29; Strawberry Plains, August 14-18; Reams Station, August 25.  1865, Petersburg Works, M   25; Appomattox campaign, March 28, April 9; White Oak Ridge, March 29-31; fall of Petersburg, April 2; Deatonsville Road, April 6; High Bridge, April 7; Farmville, April 7; New Store, April 8; Appomattox C. H., April 9. 

The 148th Regiment.--In many respects this was one of the important of the many military organizations represented by recruits from Ontario county.  In fact much of its strength came from the county, while the whole regiment was raised in the immediate vicinity, and had its place of rendezvous at Camp Swift, Geneva.  The companies were recruited principally as follows: A at Seneca Falls, Fayette, Geneva, and Canoga; B at Dundee, Starkey, Barrington and Milo; C at Phelps, Hopewell and Geneva; D at Geneva, Fayette and Varick; E in Seneca county; F at Geneva, Rushville, Gorham, Potter Center, Penn Yan and Middlesex; G at Geneva, Canandaigua and Naples; H in Seneca county; I partly in Geneva and the balance in Yates and Seneca counties, and K at Manchester, Bristol, East and West Bloomfield and Hopewell. 

The regimental organization was completed and the command mustered into service at Geneva for three years, September 14, 1862, at which time the field and staff officers were as follows: Colonel William JOHNSON, Seneca Falls; lieutenant-colonel, George M. GUYON, Seneca Falls; major, John B. MURRAY, Seneca Falls; adjutant, Henry T. NOYES, Starkey; quartermaster, Albert WOODRUFF, Lodi; surgeon, Henry SIMMONS, Canandaigua; first assistant surgeon, C. H. CARPENTER, Phelps; second assistant surgeon, Frank SEELEY, Rushville. 

The regiment left Camp Swift on the 22d of September, then having twelve companies with full 1,200 men.  Ten companies being the required number orders were reserved at Watkins, where the regiment had proceeded via steamer up Seneca Lake, directing two of the companies to return to Geneva.  In October following these companies were attached to the 44th Regiment of Infantry, N. Y. V.  The command proceeded to Washington, thence to Portsmouth, Va., and still later to Suffolk where its actual service was begun.  At first it served with the 7th Corps, and later with the 18th and finally with the 24th.  Its battles began with Gwynn's Island in No    1863, from which time it was most actively employed until the fall of Petersburg and the final regiment lost, from all causes, six officers and 261 enlisted men, twenty-four of the latter dying in the hands of the enemy. 

The 148th participated in the following engagements: Gwynn's Island, November 18, 1863; operations against Petersburg and Richmond; May 5-31, 1864; Swift Creek, May 9-10, 1864; Proctor's Creek, May 12, 1864; Drury's Bluff, May 14-16, 1864; Bermuda Hundred, May 18-26, 1864; White House, May 31, 1864; Cold Harbor, June 1-12, 1864; Second Assault, June 3, 1864; before Petersburg and Richmond, June 15, 1864, and April 2, 1865; assault of Petersburg, June 15-19, 1864; Chaffin's Farm, September 29-October 1, 1864; Fair Oaks, October 27-28, 1864; Appomattox Campaign, March 28-April 9, 1865; fall of Petersburg, April 2, 1865; Rice's Station, April 6, 1865; Burke's Station, April 7, 1865; Appomattox Court-house, April 9, 1865. 

The 160th Regiment was organized at Auburn during the fall of 1862, and was mustered into service for three years at New York city on the 21st of November.  The Ontario county contribution to this regiment formed a part of Company E, the towns of Canandaigua, East Bloomfield, Bristol, and Geneva furnishing the recruits.  The balance of the company was made up of men from Seneca Falls, Owasco, Auburn and Tyre.  The regiment left the State December 4, 1862, and was attached to Sherman's Division, Department of the Gulf, until about July, 1864, when it came north and joined the Army of the Shenandoah.  During the period of its service the regiment lost, from all causes, seven officers and 212 enlisted men, seven of the latter dying in the hands of the enemy.  The command was honorably discharged and mustered out at Savannah, Ga., November 1, 1865.  The battles of the 160th were as follows: 1863: Bayou Teche, La., Jan. 13; Gunboat Cotton, La., Jan. 14; Berwick City, La.; March 13; Pattersonville, La., March 28 and April 11; Fort Bisland, La., April 12-13; Jeanerette, La., April 14; Plain Store, La., May 21; siege of Port Hudson, La., May 23-July 8; First Assault, May 27; Second Assault, June 14.  1864, Red River Campaign, La., March 10-May 22; Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 8; Pleasant Hill, La., April 9; Cane River Crossing, La., April 23; Mausura, La., May 16; Snicker's Ferry, Va., July 20; Opequan, Va., September 19; Fisher's Hill, Va., September 22; Cedar Creek, Va., October 19. 

The 179th Regiment of Infantry was organized at Elmira and mustered into service for three years during the summer and fall of 1864.  Company K was recruited at Buffalo and in the towns of Hopewell and Phelps, the other companies of the regiment being formed by recruits generally from Western and Central New York.  The command left the State in detachments, being first attached to the 22nd Corps, from which it was transferred to the 9th Corps and so continued until mustered out June 8, 1865, near Alexandria, Va.  Although its actual service at the front was of less than a year's duration the regiment lost, from all causes, 191 men, of whom twenty-five died in the hands of the enemy.  The battles in which it participated were as follows: Cold Harbor, June 11-12, 1864; before Petersburg, June 16, 1864, and April 2, 1865; assault of Petersburg, June 16-19, 1864; Mine Explosion, June 30, 1864; Weldon Road, August 18-21, 1864; Poplar Spring Church, September 29-October 2, 1864; Hatcher's Run, October 27-28, 1864; Fort Stedman, March 25, 1865; Appomattox Campaign, March 28-April 8, 1865; fall of Petersburg, April 2, 1865. 

The 188th Regiment of Infantry was recruited by Colonel John E. McMAHON, with headquarters at Rochester, where it was organized and mustered in service during the early part of October, 1864, to serve for one year.  Company B was composed of men from Rochester, Avon, Phelps, Victor, Italy, Penn Yan, Naples and Geneseo.  A few men in Company E were from Richmond, Farmington and Seneca.  Company F had a sprinkling of Canandaigua men as also did Company G.  In Company I were a few recruits from Phelps.  The regiment, under command of Major C. C. DAVIS, left the State October 13, 1864, and served in the Second Brigade of the Fifth Corps until finally mustered out and discharged July 1, 1865, near Washington, DC.  Although less than a year in service the 188th lost ninety men from all causes.  Its battles were as follows: Before Petersburg, October 20, 1864, and April 2, 1865; Hatcher's Run, October 27-28, 1864; Hicksford Raid, December 6-11, 1864; Hatcher's Run February 5-7, 1865; Appomattox Campaign, March 28-April 9, 1865; White Oak Ridge, March 29, 1865; Gravelly Run, March 31, 1865; Five Forks, April 1, 1865; fall of Petersburg, April 2, 1865; Appomattox C. H., April 9, 1865. 

The 194th Regiment of Infantry was recruited during the early part of 1865 by Colonel Joseph W. CORNING, and was mustered into service for one and three years.  In Company C were a few recruits from Canandaigua; in Company D (9th Independent Company) were men from Victor, Seneca and Naples; in Company I (17th Independent Company) were a few recruits from Canandaigua.

The regiment was organized at Elmira, and at the same place was mustered out after about four months' service, having lost by death and disease seven enlisted men. 

The 8th Regiment of Cavalry, the first organization of its kind in which was any noticeable contingent of men from Ontario county, was organized in 1861, under authority given to Colonel Samuel J. CROOKS.  This command became a veteran organization, and was always known as a Rochester regiment, although many of its men were from other counties than Monroe.  Glancing over the records, we find men from Canandaigua in Co. A ; men from Phelps in Co. D; from Rushfield in Co. G; from Canandaigua in third Co. K, and from the same town in second Cos. L and M. 

In the latter part of November, 1861, the 8th left the rendezvous and served during the following winter in the defences of Washington.  In March, 1862, it was attached to the Department of the Shenandoah, and in June following was annexed to the 8th Corps, in the Middle Department.  Its later service was with Pleasanton's Division of Cavalry, the First Division Cav. Corps, the Third Division of the Army of the Potomac, the Army of Shenandoah, and with the Army of the Potomac.  In the numerous operations in which the cavalry participated in Virginia and Maryland, the 8th was present, and at least a part of the regiment took part in 140 battles, raids or skirmishes.  Beginning with the operations in the Shenadoah Valley, May 23, 1862, and from that time on to the surrender of LEE's army at Appomattox, April 9, 186   , the 8th was constantly engaged.  In the Shenondoah Valley, May, 1862, its losses amounted to thirty-one men; at Harper's Ferry, ninety-two; at Beverly's Ford, fifty; at Gettysburg, forty; Chester Gap, twenty-five; Brandy Sta., eighteen; on the raid to South Side and Danville R. R., 117; in the Appomattox campaign, thirty-one. 

At the expiration of the term of enlistment, the men entitled thereto were ordered to Rochester, there discharged and mustered out of service, the remaining men    consolidated into a battalion of eight companies.  The regiment, commanded by Colonel Edmund M. POPE, was finally mustered out June 27, 1865, at Alexandria, Va., having lost, during its entire service 19 officers and 305 enlisted men, of whom 3 officers and 70 men died as prisoners in the hands of the enemy.

The 9th Regiment of Cavalry (Veteran) otherwise known as Stoneman's Cavalry and the "Wesfield Cavalry" was recruited by Colonel John BEARDSLY under authority from the State.  Its organization began at Westfield and was completed at Albany.  The companies comprising the regiment were mustered into service between September 9 and December 31, 1861.  The records show that Ontario county was represented by a few recruits in this regiment, but the number was so small that no extended mention of its services is necessary in this chapter.  In Company F were a few men from Farmington, and in Company M was a small contingent of recruits from Geneva.  The services of the 9th began at Yorktown, Va., in the early part of April, 1862, and closed with the surrender at Appomattox, three years later.  However, the regiment served in and about Washington from the latter part of November, 1861, until the beginning of the campaign of the next year. 

The 15th Regiment of Cavalry was organized at Syracuse and mustered into service by companies during the summer and fall of 1863.  A portion of Company C which was mustered in August 8, was from Canandaigua and Geneva, the representation, however, from this county being exceedingly small.  The services in the field began with the battle at Hillsboro', Va., in January, 1864, and closed with Appomattox C. H., April 9, 1865. 

The 24th Regiment of Cavalry was organized by Colonel William C. RAULSTON during the latter part of 1863, and its companies were mustered into service in December of that year, and in January, 1864.  Portions of Companies H and L were recruited at Canandaigua prominent in connection with which were Captain F. T. BROWN, Lieutenant William F. JESSUP and Byron F. CRAIN.  The command left the State in February, 1864, and served for a time, dismounted in the defences of Washington.  It afterward served for a brief time in the 22nd Corps, but later and more prominently in the 9th Corps in connection with the Army of the Potomac.  Colonel RAULSTON was captured September 29, 1864, and in attempting to escape was shot and died of wounds in December following.  He was succeeded by Colonel Walter C. NEWBERRY, under whom the regiment was consolidated with the 10th N. Y. Cavalry July 10, 1865, the new organization receiving the designation "First Provisional Regiment, N. Y. Vol. Cav." 

The battles in which the 24th participated began with the Wilderness, May 5-7, 1864, and closed with Appomattox C. H., in April, 1865. 

The 1st Regiment of Mounted Rifles.  In the summer of 1862, Major DODGE was authorized to organize several companies of cavalry in order to complete a regiment, a battalion having previously been organized by permission of the war department.  The result was the formation of the First Mounted Rifles, to which the towns of Richmond and Victor contributed recruits, the men being enlisted in Company K.  On July 21, 1865, the regiment was consolidated into a battalion of seven companies.  Company K, in which were the Ontario county men, was mustered into service in August, 1862. 

The 1st Regiment of Veteran Cavalry was organized by Colonel Robert F. TAYLOR, under authority granted July 20, 1863.  According to the original design, this command was to have been designated the 17th Regiment of Cavalry, but the plan was changed before the organization was completed.  The regiment was organized at Geneva, where, September 17, 1863, the recruits intended for the 17th Cavalry were transferred to it.  The companies mustered at Geneva were C, D, E, F, G, H, I and K, and the date October 10.  Companies L and M were mustered in November 17 and 19, at the same place.  In October, 1864, Company M was consolidated with A, and the former replaced by a new Company M.  It would be difficult indeed to determine accurately the number of Ontario county men which were members of this command, as the recruits were scattered through several of its companies.  Men from Geneva were in Companies C, D, E, G, H, I, L and M.  Canandaigua was also represented in Company E, and Seneca in Company L.  The regiment left the State by companies and served in the Department of Washington until February, 1864, and was then attached to the Army of West Virginia.  In October following it formed a part of the Army of the Shenandoah, but in March, 1865, returned to the Army of West Virginia.  On July 20, 1865, then under command of Colonel John S. PLATNER, the First Veteran Cavalry was honorably discharged and mustered out of service at Camp Piatt, W. Va. 

The 2nd Regiment of Cavalry was organized during the summer of 1861, and mustered into service in August and October of that year.

The command was originally known as the "Harris Light Cavalry," but the War Department designated it the "7th Regiment of Cavalry" in the service of the United States.  However, when the regiment was turned over to the State it was numbered the "Second Regiment of N. Y. Vol. Cavalry." 

The original command was composed of recruits and squadrons from New York, Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Indiana; and as one of the actively employed regiments in the Army of the Potomac, its services were necessarily severe and its losses heavy.  At the expiration of its term of service many of the men were mustered out, and the remainder consolidated into a battalion of four companies.  In September and October, 1864, eight new companies joined the command and again raised it to a regiment; and it was among these recruits that we find the names of Ontario county men, representing principally the towns of Farmington and Hopewell and members of Company K. 

The 4th Regiment of Heavy Artillery (Veteran) was organized during the summer and fall of 1861, and mustered in by companies in the following winter.  It was recruited under authority given to Colonel T. D. DOUBLEDAY, and was originally known as "Doubleday's Heavy Artillery," but afterward designated the "First Heavy Artillery," and still later as the "Fourth Heavy Artillery."  In this command the greater part of the Ontario county contribution are said to have been in Company H; in fact that has been called the Ontario Company.  However, Canandaigua and Geneva both furnished recruits to Company M, and the village last named to Second Company D. 

The regiment went to Washington in February, 1862, and served in that vicinity for a time, and later with the 22nd Corps, serving both as artillery and infantry.  Its battles were fought nearly without exception in Virginia, but during the period of its service, the regiment lost a total, from all causes, of 464 men of whom 97 died as prisoners in the hands of the enemy.  On September 26, 1865, at Washington, the 4th was mustered out of service. 

The 9th Regiment of Heavy Artillery, a command which was otherwise known as the "Second Auburn Regiment," and the "Cayuga and Wayne County Regiment," was organized during the late summer of 1862, being mustered into service on the 8th and 9th of September, and designated the 138th Regiment of Infantry.  It was converted into an artillery regiment in December, 1862, and received the designation as given above.  A small part of Company F of the 7th was recruited in Geneva, but the contingent of men was so very small that little mention of the regiment need be given here.  The 9th was mustered out of service July 6, 1865. 

The 13th Regiment of Heavy Artillery was organized during the spring and early summer of 1863, and was mustered into service by companies as rapidly as formed.  In Company B were a few men from the town of Seneca. 

The 16th Regiment of Heavy Artillery was organized in pursuance of authority granted to Colonel Joseph J. MORRISON, and the command itself was raised during the summer and fall of 1863.  In the regiment were a few Ontario county men, who were enlisted in Companies D and H, and who represented the towns of Canandaigua and Bristol.  The company first mentioned was mustered into service December 1, 1863, and the latter February 8, 1864.  The regiment left the State by detachments, and its service in the field was also of a detached character previous to July, 1865, when it was united.  It was mustered out of service at Washington, D. C., August 21, 1865.

 

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